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SMALLHOLDER PIGVALUE CHAINSIN EAST AFRICATom Randolph (ILRI) ILRI/ASARECA Cysticercosis Workshop ILRI, Nairobi, 21 Septemb...
 Pig numbers in Uganda, 1961-2008 (Source:FAOSTAT | © FAO Statistics Division 2010 | 14 September 2010; MAAIF/UBOS 2009)<b...
Structure of the Pork Sector<br /><ul><li>Large informal subsector
Backyard pig production
Few animals
Free-range, tethered
Peri-urban small-scale intensive
Uncoordinated trade & transport
Unsupervised slaughter in local markets, road-side butchers
Pork joints
In Uganda  (2008 Livestock Census)
3.2 million pigs
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Smallholder pig value chains in East Africa

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Presented by Tom Randolph at the ILRI/ASARECA Cysticercosis Workshop, ILRI, Nairobi, 21 September 2011.

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Smallholder pig value chains in East Africa

  1. 1. SMALLHOLDER PIGVALUE CHAINSIN EAST AFRICATom Randolph (ILRI) ILRI/ASARECA Cysticercosis Workshop ILRI, Nairobi, 21 September 2011<br />
  2. 2. Pig numbers in Uganda, 1961-2008 (Source:FAOSTAT | © FAO Statistics Division 2010 | 14 September 2010; MAAIF/UBOS 2009)<br /> Pig numbers in Uganda, 1961-2008 (Source:FAOSTAT | © FAO Statistics Division 2010 | 14 September 2010; MAAIF/UBOS 2009)<br />Background information<br />Meat production in Uganda<br /> Type Amount<br /> (1,000 tonnes) <br />Beef 96.8 <br />Pigmeat 77.4<br />Chicken meat 44.1 <br />Goat meat 24.6 <br />Sheep meat 5.3<br />Source: FAOSTAT | © FAO Statistics Division 2010 | 14 September 2010<br />Pig production- a dynamic and rapid growth sector in the region<br />The trend- a fast growing sector in Uganda, possibly in Kenya and Tanzania<br />A rising demand for pork and pork products<br />Increasing human population <br />Changing tastes<br />Pig numbers in Uganda, 1961-2008 (Source: FAOSTAT | © FAO Statistics Division 2010 | 14 September 2010; MAAIF/UBOS 2009)<br />
  3. 3. Structure of the Pork Sector<br /><ul><li>Large informal subsector
  4. 4. Backyard pig production
  5. 5. Few animals
  6. 6. Free-range, tethered
  7. 7. Peri-urban small-scale intensive
  8. 8. Uncoordinated trade & transport
  9. 9. Unsupervised slaughter in local markets, road-side butchers
  10. 10. Pork joints
  11. 11. In Uganda (2008 Livestock Census)
  12. 12. 3.2 million pigs
  13. 13. 1.1 households keep pigs
  14. 14. 17% of all households</li></li></ul><li>Distribution of pig keeping in Uganda<br />Percent of households keeping pigs, by district<br />
  15. 15. Structure of the Pork Sector<br />Small formal subsector<br />Medium-scale piggeries<br />Urban slaughterhouses<br />Processors<br />Fresh Cuts (Uganda)<br />Farmers Choice (Kenya)<br />Outgrower scheme: Farmers Choice<br />
  16. 16. Actors in a typical pork value chain<br />Farm-level<br /><ul><li>The pig farmer</li></ul>Inputs & Services<br /><ul><li>Pig breeder
  17. 17. Vet / Animal Health worker
  18. 18. Agrovet / feed shop owners
  19. 19. Extensionists
  20. 20. Feed manufacturers and suppliers
  21. 21. Transporters- feed</li></ul>Post-farm<br /><ul><li>Live-pig traders
  22. 22. Transporters
  23. 23. Slaughterers- includes the owners and the employees
  24. 24. Pork Butchers
  25. 25. Pork processors- large and medium
  26. 26. Supermarkets / pork hotels / pork joints
  27. 27. Consumers </li></li></ul><li>Immense potentialfor pro-poor development<br /><ul><li>Sure market
  28. 28. Lucrative
  29. 29. Intensification can be incremental, doesn’t require quantum leaps in investment, know-how
  30. 30. Often women’s activity
  31. 31. Segmented market: rewarding quality, supplying the poor
  32. 32. Opportunities for significant efficiency gains
  33. 33. Largely ignored by policymakers
  34. 34. Competitive vis-à-vis commercial sector
  35. 35. Cultural pros and cons</li></li></ul><li>Constraints in thesmallholder pig value chain<br />At farm level<br />Husbandry & management<br />Nutrition and feed<br />Swine health (ASF, others)<br />Genetics & breeding strategies<br />Access to information, services<br />Organizational strategies to achieve economies of scale<br />Specialization<br />
  36. 36. Understanding the pig production cycle key intervention areas…<br />Selection? Health? Method used? Feeding? <br />How many times do you breed? Parity? When to cull? etc<br />Loss?<br />Loss??<br />Do farmers wean piglets at once?? Causes of delays in the next heat period ??? <br />Loss?<br />The consequence of too early or delayed weaning??? Piglet health<br />Loss?<br />
  37. 37. Constraints in thesmallholder pig value chain<br />At market level<br /><ul><li>Organizational strategies
  38. 38. Information asymmetries: market information, standards
  39. 39. Slaughter technologies and infrastructure (by-product losses)
  40. 40. Minimal attention to disease control and public health concerns
  41. 41. Underdeveloped processing sector</li></li></ul><li>The Informal pig chain systems<br /><ul><li>A major characteristic in rural smallholder production systems
  42. 42. The need to understand the role of the informal systems in promoting the livelihoods of the poor
  43. 43. Understanding and promoting these through a number of method- existing policies</li></li></ul><li>The Breeding pig- an opportunity for improvement in the pig sector<br />The important role of breeding pigs in the communities<br />They present the main sources of weaned pigs<br />
  44. 44. Opportunities…..<br /><ul><li>Intensification through better technologies
  45. 45. Improve efficiency to lower production costs and increase profitability
  46. 46. Institutional innovations- service hubs for farmer groups, contract farming schemes etc
  47. 47. Increase supply, reduce wastage and promote value addition
  48. 48. Improve pork quality
  49. 49. Vertical and horizontal integration efforts- research using the value chain approach</li></li></ul><li>A role of improved diagnostics?<br />For conventional disease control:<br /><ul><li>Early diagnosis, management and reduced disease risks
  50. 50. National disease monitoring and surveillance </li></ul>Wider applications for market development:<br /><ul><li>Improved public health that would increase consumer confidence - avoid consumer scares
  51. 51. Correct information asymmetries in marketing</li></li></ul><li>THANK YOU<br />
  52. 52. Actors in the pig value chain<br />The pig farmers<br />Traders / Butchers<br />Slaughterhouses<br />Owners, employees<br />Transporters <br />Bicycles, motor cycles<br />Pork Hotels<br />Consumers<br />

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