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Safe Food, Fair Food: Selected
diseases of sheep and goats in
the Ethiopian value chain

Barbara Szonyi, Tamsin Dewé and D...
Presentation outline
 Objectives and goals of SFFF
 Timeline of activities
 What has been done
 Results so far
 Curre...
Safe Food, Fair Food
 Risk-based approach to food safety
– Structured way of evaluating and dealing with
risks
– Identifi...
Codex Alimentarius framework
for food safety risk assessment
Hazard identification
What harm does it cause?
How does harm ...
Study sites in Ethiopia
# VCs

District

Sites/villages/
communities

Region

Highlands
1 Sheep 1

Atsbi

1.

Tigray

Doyo...
Strategy & Timeline

Qualitative
assessment of
food safety
risks (yr 1)

In-depth,
quantitive
assessment
(yr 1-2)

Identif...
Qualitative assessment of food
safety in the value chain
 Participatory Rural Appraisals and Focus
Group Discussions
– To...
Food safety risks
 Low level of consumption of ASF
– Nutritional deficiencies
– Gender differences in consumption
 Consu...
Constraints on animal
production
 Major constraints on production is disease
and lack of feed
 Most important health pro...
Proportional morbidity in sheep
Atsbi
Other
5%

Doyogena

Respiratory
disease
12%
Bottle jaw
9%

Enterotoxae
mia
29%

Ecto...
Proportional mortality in sheep
Predation
6%

Bottle jaw
Respiratory
2%
disease
Coenurosis
2%
5%
Ectoparasites
3%

Atsbi

...
Proportional morbidity in goats
Abergelle Amhara
Coenurosis
8%

Abergelle Tigray

Respiratory
disease
13%
Other
8%

Other
...
Proportional mortality in goats
Other
1%

Abergelle Amhara

Accident
9%

Coenurosis
7%

Other
5%

Respiratory
disease PPR
...
Quantitative risk
assessment
 Questionnaires for producers, consumers
and value chain actors
 Biological sampling in aba...
Future work
 Identify best-bet interventions
 Pilot study of intervention
 Activities at regional level – engaging food...
Safe Food, Fair Food
Outline of diseases presented
 Foot rot
 Respiratory diseases
 Orf
 Enterotoxemia
 Endoparasites
 Ectoparasites
Foot rot
 Infectious bacterial disease of sheep that
causes severe lameness and economic
loss from decreased flock produc...
Foot rot progression

Photos by Dr. Clell Bagley, D.V.M., and Utah State University
Foot rot epidemiology
 Introduced by purchase of an infected
animal or by using facilities that have been
contaminated by...
Foot rot treatment and
prevention
 Vaccination, antibiotics, regular foot
trimming, and footsoaks/baths
 Bacteroides can...
Foot rot prevention
 Never buy sheep with foot rot or from a flock infected
with foot rot, even if the animal(s) appear u...
Foot rot prevention

Veterinary Surgeons Board Of Western Australia
Respiratory disease in sheep
and goats
 Signs: coughing, difficulty breathing, weight loss, nasal
discharge
 As a genera...
Pasteurellosis
 Caused by Pasteurella/Mannheimia
haemolytica bacteria
 Clinical signs:
– Systemic illness: acute onset
d...
Pasteurellosis
 Diagnosis of respiratory disease caused
by P./M. haemolytica is based upon
clinical signs
 Confirmation ...
Pasteurellosis epidemiology
 In order for these organisms to
cause infection, a combination of
stressors (heat, overcrowd...
Pasteurellosis prevention
 Inclusion of prophylactic antibiotics,
mainly tetracycline, in the feed during
the months of t...
CCPP
 Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia is a
contagious disease of goats caused by
Mycoplasma capricolum subsp.
Capripne...
CCPP
 Outbreaks of the disease often occur after
heavy rains , after cold spells or after
transportation over long distan...
CCPP – clinical signs
 Peracute form: affected goats may die
within 1–3 days with minimal clinical signs
 Acute: high fe...
CCPP control and treatment
 Treatment
– Treatment of sick animals with broad spectrum
antibiotics
 Prevention
– Ring vac...
Lungworms
 Caused by Dictyocaulus filari
 Prevalent in highlands and semi-highlands
in Ethiopia
 Eggs are laid in the l...
Orf, sore mouth
 Zoonotic viral disease
 Affected lambs or kids may spread disease to
mother’s udder
 Ewes/does refuse ...
Enterotoxemia
 Caused by two strains of Clostridium perfringens – types C
and D
– These bacteria are normally found in lo...
Enterotoxemia – clinical signs
 The animals may abruptly go off of feed and become
lethargic
 Signs of abdominal pain
– ...
Enterotoxemia – treatment and
prevention
 Mild cases with analgesics, probiotics,
oral electrolyte solutions, and antiser...
Enterotoxemia prevention
 Smart feeding strategies: give small
portions of high risk feeds
 Always make feed changes slo...
Endoparasites
 Worms = Helminths
– Roundworms=Nematodes
• Both adult and larval forms live in GI tract of the same host

...
Condemnation rates in abattoir
Sheep
Young
Adult
Total
Goat
Young
Adult
Total
Overall

488
664
1152

liver
N
261
413
674

...
Liver condemnation in sheep

Fasciolosis
Cirrhosis
Hepatitis
Stelesia hepatica
Cysticercus tenuicollis
Calcifications
Mech...
Liver condemnation in goats
Fasciolosis
Cirrhosis
Hepatitis
Stelesia hepatica
Cysticercus tenuicollis
Calcifications
Mecha...
Lung condemnation in sheep

Pneumonia
Emphysema
Hydatid cyst
Abscess
Calcification
Others
Total

Young
N
132
33
7
5
14
5
1...
Lung condemnation in goats

Pneumonia
Emphysema
Hydatid cyst
Abscess
Calcification
Others
Total

Young
N
122
34
4
7
8
9
18...
Larval tapeworm infections
 Adult form lives in dogs; larval forms in
internal organs of sheep/goat
 Taenia hydatigena -...
Larval tapeworm infections
 Endemic in Ethiopian highland sheep
population
 Lack of deworming of dogs
 Stray dogs and f...
Hydatidosis
Hydatidosis
 Echinococcus granulosis – hydatid cyst
cycle – zoontic risk!
 Economic consequence: condemnation of
carcass...
Coenurosis
 Coenurosis is fatal disease of sheep
– Coenurus cerebralis=cystic larval stage of
Taenia multiceps tapeworm

...
Coenurosis clinical signs
 Circling, incoordination, dullness, head tilt,
blindness, paralysis, separation from herd
 Co...
Coenurosis necropsy findings
 Pathological finding: necrosis of brain
tissues around cyst, hemorrhage
 Cyst with scolice...
Prevention of larval tapeworm
infections
 Control tapeworm infection in dogs
 Prevent dogs from accessing sheep
carcass
...
Stilezia hepatica
 Stilesia hepatica adult tapeworm, lives in
bile duct of sheep and goat
– Mites are suspected as interm...
Fasciolosis
 Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica
– In Ethiopia, F. gigantica is found at altitudes below 1800
m whil...
Fasciola life cycle
Fasciolosis- clinical signs
 Acute form: sudden death,
abdominal pain, massive
tissue damage due to
migrating larvae
 Su...
Fasciolosis diagnosis
 Tentative based on history and clinical
signs
 Confirmation by demonstration of eggs by
fecal exa...
Fasciolosis control and prevention
 Reduction of snails on pastures
– Chemicals, biological, drainage
 Strategic applica...
Black disease and Red Water
 Soil-borne Clostridial infections in conjunction
with liver flukes
 Bacteria proliferate an...
Black disease and Red water
 The course of this disease is short and
affected animals are usually found dead
having shown...
Haemonchosis
 Infection with Haemonchus Contortus,
better known as the barber pole or wire
worm
 Round worm (Nematode) t...
Haemonchosis
 The symptom is anemia, characterized by
pale mucous membranes, especially in the
lower eye lid; and bottle ...
Haemonchus life cycle
 Single-host parasites
 Adult worm lives in
GI tract, eggs
passed in feces
Ectoparasites
 Spend some or all of their life cycle on the skin of
affected animals
– As a general rule, those that spen...
Ectoparasites
 Heavy infestations can considerably
reduce the condition of the host and cause
anemia
 May transmit disea...
Ectoparasites in sheep
Sheep ked (Melophagus ovinus)
Damalinia ovis
Sarcoptes scabiei
Amblyomma
Ctenocephalides
Demodex
Li...
Ectoparasites in goats

Sarcoptes scabiei
Linognathus stenopsis
Amblyomma
Bovicola caprae
Demodex caprae
Ctenocephalides s...
Ticks
 Transmit diseases such as Anaplasmosis,
Babesiosis, Nairobi sheep disease,
Theileriosis
Sheep ked
 The sheep ked, Melophagus ovinus wingless flies, such blood of sheep
Sarcoptes scabiei
 The disease caused by these mites is
called mange or scabies
 Animals with mange often have bald
patc...
Lice
 Lice are wingless insects with flattened
bodies
 The sheep louse (Bovicola ovis) spends
its entire life cycle on t...
Demodicosis
 Demodectic mange, Demodex spp
 Mites invade hair follicles
 Causes small nodules on skin that may
develop ...
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Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 1 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 2 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 3 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 4 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 5 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 6 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 7 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 8 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 9 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 10 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 11 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 12 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 13 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 14 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 15 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 16 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 17 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 18 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 19 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 20 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 21 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 22 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 23 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 24 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 25 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 26 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 27 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 28 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 29 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 30 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 31 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 32 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 33 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 34 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 35 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 36 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 37 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 38 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 39 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 40 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 41 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 42 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 43 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 44 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 45 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 46 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 47 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 48 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 49 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 50 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 51 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 52 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 53 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 54 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 55 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 56 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 57 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 58 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 59 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 60 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 61 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 62 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 63 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 64 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 65 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 66 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 67 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 68 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 69 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 70 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 71 Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain Slide 72
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Presented by Barbara Szonyi, Tamsin Dewé and Delia Grace at a meat inspectors' training course, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia, 25-29 November 2013.

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Selected diseases of sheep and goat in the Ethiopian value chain

  1. 1. Safe Food, Fair Food: Selected diseases of sheep and goats in the Ethiopian value chain Barbara Szonyi, Tamsin Dewé and Delia Grace Presentation at a meat inspectors’ training course, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia 25-29 November 2013
  2. 2. Presentation outline  Objectives and goals of SFFF  Timeline of activities  What has been done  Results so far  Current and future work  Selected parasitic, metabolic and production diseases of sheep and goat
  3. 3. Safe Food, Fair Food  Risk-based approach to food safety – Structured way of evaluating and dealing with risks – Identifies major risks in food value chain from farm to fork (multidisciplinary) – Identifies most useful points of intervention  Training of meat inspectors
  4. 4. Codex Alimentarius framework for food safety risk assessment Hazard identification What harm does it cause? How does harm depend on dose? How does it get from source to victim? What happens along the way? Hazard characterization What is the harm? What is its likelihood? Can it be present in food? Can it cause harm? Exposure assessment Risk characterization Participatory methods fit well Risk management/ Risk communication 4
  5. 5. Study sites in Ethiopia # VCs District Sites/villages/ communities Region Highlands 1 Sheep 1 Atsbi 1. Tigray Doyogena 2. Golgol na’ele 1. Serea SNNP Menz 2. Bkafa 1. Molale Amhara Horro/Shambu 2. Mehal Meda 1. Gitlo Oromia Abergelle 2. Lakku Iggu 1. Sazba (Amhara) 2 Sheep 2 3 Sheep 3 4 Sheep 4 5 Goat 1 Habes 2. Felegehiwot (Tigray) Lowlands 6 Goat 2 Yabello (Borana) 7 Goat/Sheep Shinelle Amhara/ Tigray 1. Eleweya Oromia 2. 1. Darito Gad Somalia 2. Degah Jebis
  6. 6. Strategy & Timeline Qualitative assessment of food safety risks (yr 1) In-depth, quantitive assessment (yr 1-2) Identify and pilot best-bet interventions (yr 2-3) Disseminate findings – engagement of food safety stakeholders (yr 3) Upgrade training curricula to include propoor risk analysis (yr 3) Continuous monitoring and evaluation and impact assessment 6
  7. 7. Qualitative assessment of food safety in the value chain  Participatory Rural Appraisals and Focus Group Discussions – Topics included animal health, consumption patterns, food preparation, and perceptions of quality and safety of meat and milk  Outputs – ASF production and consumption cycles and constraints on these – Food selection and handling practices – Risk awareness and management
  8. 8. Food safety risks  Low level of consumption of ASF – Nutritional deficiencies – Gender differences in consumption  Consumption of raw and/or lightly cooked meat  Consumption of raw milk  Consumption of sick animals  Drug residues in meat
  9. 9. Constraints on animal production  Major constraints on production is disease and lack of feed  Most important health problems are respiratory disease, ecto-, and endoparasites – Site-dependent variation
  10. 10. Proportional morbidity in sheep Atsbi Other 5% Doyogena Respiratory disease 12% Bottle jaw 9% Enterotoxae mia 29% Ectoparasites 9% Other 2% Grain overload/ bloat 6% "Big head" 11% Lamb mortality 6% Pink eye 5% Diarrhoea 17% Coenurosis 36% Orf 9% Horro Other Blindness 5% Coenurosis 2% Respiratory disease 30% Diarrhoea 9% Other 7% Orf 7% Sheep pox 28% Starvation 16% Diarrhoea 22% Bottle jaw 27% Bottle jaw 18% Menz 11% Grain overload/bloat 5% Respiratory disease 30% Bottle jaw 11% Respiratory disease 24%
  11. 11. Proportional mortality in sheep Predation 6% Bottle jaw Respiratory 2% disease Coenurosis 2% 5% Ectoparasites 3% Atsbi Enterotoxaemia 18% Accident 6% Doyogena Predation 7% Starvation 0% Bottle jaw 15% Lamb mortality 11% Diarrhoea 13% Bloat/grain overload 10% Starvation 64% Other 3% Respiratory disease 38% Horro Menz Coenurosis 9% Predation 6% Unknown cause 3% Predation 30% Diarrhoea 15% Lameness 1% Bloat/grain Blindess overload 1% 3% Respiratory disease 25% Diarrhoea 5% Starvation 15% Bottle jaw 14% Starvation 2% Coenurosis 7% Bottle jaw 9% Bloat/grain overload 2% Orf 5% Sheep pox 23% Respiratory disease 27%
  12. 12. Proportional morbidity in goats Abergelle Amhara Coenurosis 8% Abergelle Tigray Respiratory disease 13% Other 8% Other 16% Coenurosis 4% Ectoparasites 12% Ectoparasites 16% Diarrhoea 33% PPR 26% Other 5% Enterotoxaemia 10% Borena PPR 15% Respiratory disease 13% Bottle jaw 9% Diarrhoea 10% Coenurosis 51% Respiratory disease 29% Ectoparasites 3% Diarrhoea 20% Shinelle Other 7% Respiratory disease 20% FMD 13% Babesiosis 15% Ectoparasites 25% PPR 20%
  13. 13. Proportional mortality in goats Other 1% Abergelle Amhara Accident 9% Coenurosis 7% Other 5% Respiratory disease PPR 12% 1% Accident 0% Diarrhoea 15% Predation 29% Respiratory disease 4% PPR 8% Starvation 25% Accident 2% Predation 8% Ectoparasites 3% Predation 41% Toxicity 8% Other 0% Shinelle Other 1% Accident 15% Enterotoxaemia 6% Starvation 14% Coenurosis 43% Ectoparasites 1% Respiratory disease 8% Respiratory disease 6% PPR 9% Predation 20% Starvation 43% Diarrhoea 13% Bottle jaw 7% Periparturient 4% Starvation 19% Ectoparasite s 2% Borena Diarrhoea 7% Abergelle Tigray Ectoparasites 4% Babesiosis 3%
  14. 14. Quantitative risk assessment  Questionnaires for producers, consumers and value chain actors  Biological sampling in abattoirs – Coliforms, E. coli 0157:H7 – Campylobacter – Salmonella – antimicrobial resistance
  15. 15. Future work  Identify best-bet interventions  Pilot study of intervention  Activities at regional level – engaging food safety stakeholders to promote an enabling environment for pro-poor food safety management  Upgrading academic and training curricula
  16. 16. Safe Food, Fair Food
  17. 17. Outline of diseases presented  Foot rot  Respiratory diseases  Orf  Enterotoxemia  Endoparasites  Ectoparasites
  18. 18. Foot rot  Infectious bacterial disease of sheep that causes severe lameness and economic loss from decreased flock production  Bacteriodes nodosus, lives in hoof of infected animals; survives up to 2 weeks in the environment  Clinical signs: lameness, area between toes becomes moist and red, foul odor
  19. 19. Foot rot progression Photos by Dr. Clell Bagley, D.V.M., and Utah State University
  20. 20. Foot rot epidemiology  Introduced by purchase of an infected animal or by using facilities that have been contaminated by infected sheep  Spread from infected sheep to the ground, manure, bedding, etc., where it is then picked up by noninfected sheep – Spread occurs best when temperatures are from 15-25 C and the environment is wet
  21. 21. Foot rot treatment and prevention  Vaccination, antibiotics, regular foot trimming, and footsoaks/baths  Bacteroides can only live in the hoof of an infected animal or in the soil for no more than 14 days  It is possible, through careful management procedures, to avoid introducing foot rot into a flock and/or eliminate the disease if the flock is infected
  22. 22. Foot rot prevention  Never buy sheep with foot rot or from a flock infected with foot rot, even if the animal(s) appear unaffected  Avoid buying sheep at sale yards or livestock markets where clean and infected sheep may have been commingled or run through the same area  Avoid using facilities (trails, corrals, dipping areas) where infected sheep may have been in the last two weeks  Never transport sheep in a vehicle that has not been properly cleaned and disinfected  Trim and treat the feet of all new arrivals, then reexamine them periodically
  23. 23. Foot rot prevention Veterinary Surgeons Board Of Western Australia
  24. 24. Respiratory disease in sheep and goats  Signs: coughing, difficulty breathing, weight loss, nasal discharge  As a general rule, transmitted by aerosol and secretions  Potential causes: – Viral • Maedi-visna; jaagsiekte – Bacterial – CCPP, Pasteurellosis – Parasites • Lungworms  Often diagnosis can only be made post-mortem  Treatment depends on agent: – Antibiotics for bacterial; no treatment for viral; anthelmintics for worms
  25. 25. Pasteurellosis  Caused by Pasteurella/Mannheimia haemolytica bacteria  Clinical signs: – Systemic illness: acute onset depression, lethargy and inappetence, the animal is found dead – Chronic respiratory disease
  26. 26. Pasteurellosis  Diagnosis of respiratory disease caused by P./M. haemolytica is based upon clinical signs  Confirmation of diagnosis is made at necropsy with histopathological examination of lung lesions and bacteriology  Treat with oxytetracycline
  27. 27. Pasteurellosis epidemiology  In order for these organisms to cause infection, a combination of stressors (heat, overcrowding, exposure to inclement weather, poor ventilation, handling, and transportation) leaves sheep and goats susceptible to respiratory viral infections  The combination of stressors and primary infections break down the mucosal barrier integrity of the lower respiratory tract, allowing M. haemolytica to colonize, proliferate and induce significant tissue damage
  28. 28. Pasteurellosis prevention  Inclusion of prophylactic antibiotics, mainly tetracycline, in the feed during the months of the year with the highest incidence  Avoidance or reduction of known stressors
  29. 29. CCPP  Contagious caprine pleuropneumonia is a contagious disease of goats caused by Mycoplasma capricolum subsp. Capripneumoniae (F18 Biotype)  One of the most severe diseases of goats  Mortality can be as high as 80% in native flocks
  30. 30. CCPP  Outbreaks of the disease often occur after heavy rains , after cold spells or after transportation over long distances – This may be because recovered carrier animals shed the infectious agent after the stress of sudden climatic or environmental changes  A carrier state is likely but not proven
  31. 31. CCPP – clinical signs  Peracute form: affected goats may die within 1–3 days with minimal clinical signs  Acute: high fever, lethargy, frequent coughing, nasal discharge  Chronic: chronic cough, nasal discharge
  32. 32. CCPP control and treatment  Treatment – Treatment of sick animals with broad spectrum antibiotics  Prevention – Ring vaccination of CCPP vaccine is given around the outbreak sites. The National Veterinary Institute (NVI) at Debre Zeit produces a limited amount of CCPP vaccine – Restriction of movement of goats from and to the outbreak areas is necessary to prevent spread of the disease
  33. 33. Lungworms  Caused by Dictyocaulus filari  Prevalent in highlands and semi-highlands in Ethiopia  Eggs are laid in the lungs, coughed up and swallowed, then passed out in the feces  Clinical signs are coughing and difficulty breathing  No fever
  34. 34. Orf, sore mouth  Zoonotic viral disease  Affected lambs or kids may spread disease to mother’s udder  Ewes/does refuse to suckle lamb/kids which may starve
  35. 35. Enterotoxemia  Caused by two strains of Clostridium perfringens – types C and D – These bacteria are normally found in low numbers in the gastrointestinal tract of all sheep and goats  Cause of disease is a sudden change in the diet of the animal – an increase in the amount of grain, protein supplement, milk or milk replacer (for lambs and kids), and/or grass that the sheep or goat is ingesting • these feeds are rich in starch, sugar, and/or protein – Clostridium perfringens undergoes explosive growth within the intestine and releases very potent toxins – Toxins damage intestines and other organs
  36. 36. Enterotoxemia – clinical signs  The animals may abruptly go off of feed and become lethargic  Signs of abdominal pain – kicking at their belly, repeatedly laying down and getting up, laying on their sides, panting, and crying out  Diarrhea, blood in the loose stool  Animals may lose the ability to stand, lay on their sides, extend their legs, with their head and neck extended – This posture is caused by the effects of the toxins on the brain. Death commonly occurs within minutes to hours after this sign is seen  Can progress so quickly, animals may be found dead with no previous signs of disease
  37. 37. Enterotoxemia – treatment and prevention  Mild cases with analgesics, probiotics, oral electrolyte solutions, and antisera (a solution of concentrated antibodies that neutralize the toxins)  Vaccination is the cornerstone to prevention – For sheep and goats, there are multiple vaccines available that induce immunity to the toxins generated by Clostridium perfringens types C and D
  38. 38. Enterotoxemia prevention  Smart feeding strategies: give small portions of high risk feeds  Always make feed changes slowly – For animals being turned out onto pasture after being fed hay or other stored feeds, begin by allowing only about 10 minutes of grazing time on the first day. Double this with each subsequent day – it will take about a week for them to work up to a full 24 hours on pasture.
  39. 39. Endoparasites  Worms = Helminths – Roundworms=Nematodes • Both adult and larval forms live in GI tract of the same host – Flatworms • Tapeworms=Cestodes – Larval infection in intermediate host – Adult forms reproduce in definitive host • Liver flukes=Trematodes  Signs of internal parasites: poor condition, pale mucous membranes, bottle jaw  Condemnation of carcass is major economic loss  Diagnosis: eggs in feces of definitive host; post-mortem in intermediate host
  40. 40. Condemnation rates in abattoir Sheep Young Adult Total Goat Young Adult Total Overall 488 664 1152 liver N 261 413 674 Organs condemned lung % N 54 196 61.7 317 58.5 513 659 877 1536 2688 259 414 673 1347 39.3 47.2 43.8 50.1 N examined 184 456 640 1153 % 40.6 47.4 44.5 carcass N 22 55 77 % 4.6 8.2 6.7 27.9 52 41.7 42.9 46 65 111 188 7 7.4 7.2 7 T. Jibat et al. Causes of abattoir condemnation in apparently healthy slaughtered sheep and goats at HELMEX abattoir, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia. Revue Méd. Vét., 2008, 159, 5, 305-311.
  41. 41. Liver condemnation in sheep Fasciolosis Cirrhosis Hepatitis Stelesia hepatica Cysticercus tenuicollis Calcifications Mechanical damage Hydatid cyst Abscess Other causes Overall Young N 25 13 73 50 22 16 45 3 7 7 261 % 5.2 2.7 15.1 10.4 4.6 3.3 9.2 0.6 1.4 1.4 53.5 Sheep (n=1152) Adult N % 55 8.3 23 3.5 130 19.6 58 8.7 39 5.9 44 6.6 26 3.9 7 1 19 2.9 12 1.8 413 62.2 Total N 80 36 203 108 61 60 71 10 26 19 674 % 6.9 3.1 17.6 9.5 5.2 5.2 6.2 0.9 2.3 1.6 58.5 T. Jibat et al. Causes of abattoir condemnation in apparently healthy slaughtered sheep and goats at HELMEX abattoir, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia. Revue Méd. Vét., 2008, 159, 5, 305-311.
  42. 42. Liver condemnation in goats Fasciolosis Cirrhosis Hepatitis Stelesia hepatica Cysticercus tenuicollis Calcifications Mechanical damage Hydatid cyst Abscess Other causes Overall Young N 22 4 13 76 65 17 42 6 10 4 259 % 3.3 0.6 2 11.5 9.9 2.6 6.4 0.9 1.5 0.6 39.3 Goats (n= 1536) Adult N % 33 3.8 31 3.5 47 5.4 110 12.5 62 7.1 47 5.4 24 2.7 21 2.4 28 3.2 11 12.5 414 47.2 Total N 55 35 60 186 127 64 66 27 38 15 673 % 3.6 2.3 3.9 12.1 8.3 4.2 4.3 1.7 2.5 0.9 43.8 T. Jibat et al. Causes of abattoir condemnation in apparently healthy slaughtered sheep and goats at HELMEX abattoir, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia. Revue Méd. Vét., 2008, 159, 5, 305-311.
  43. 43. Lung condemnation in sheep Pneumonia Emphysema Hydatid cyst Abscess Calcification Others Total Young N 132 33 7 5 14 5 196 % 27.3 6.8 1.4 1 2.9 1 40.6 Sheep (n=1152) Adult N % 191 28.8 46 6.9 31 4.7 21 3.2 17 2.6 11 1.6 317 47.4 Total N 323 79 38 26 31 16 513 % 28 6.9 3.3 2.3 2.7 1.4 44.5
  44. 44. Lung condemnation in goats Pneumonia Emphysema Hydatid cyst Abscess Calcification Others Total Young N 122 34 4 7 8 9 184 % 18.5 5.2 0.6 1.1 1.2 1.4 27.9 Goats (n=1536) Adult N % 284 32.4 72 8.6 37 4.2 25 2.9 28 3.2 10 1.1 456 51.9 Total N 406 106 41 3.2 36 19 640 % 26.4 6.9 2.7 2.1 2.3 1.9 41.7 T. Jibat et al. Causes of abattoir condemnation in apparently healthy slaughtered sheep and goats at HELMEX abattoir, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia. Revue Méd. Vét., 2008, 159, 5, 305-311.
  45. 45. Larval tapeworm infections  Adult form lives in dogs; larval forms in internal organs of sheep/goat  Taenia hydatigena -Cysticercus tenuicollis (peritoneal cavity)  Taenia multiceps –Coenurus cerebralis (brain)  Echinococcus granulosis – hydatid cystzoonotic!
  46. 46. Larval tapeworm infections  Endemic in Ethiopian highland sheep population  Lack of deworming of dogs  Stray dogs and foxes have access to offal  Freely roaming dogs on grazing land  Dogs are fed sheep head and not dewormed  Backyard slaughter of sheep
  47. 47. Hydatidosis
  48. 48. Hydatidosis  Echinococcus granulosis – hydatid cyst cycle – zoontic risk!  Economic consequence: condemnation of carcasses
  49. 49. Coenurosis  Coenurosis is fatal disease of sheep – Coenurus cerebralis=cystic larval stage of Taenia multiceps tapeworm  Mature Taenia multiceps worm in small intestine of dogs, foxes (definitive host)  Coenurus cysts develop in brain of intermediate hosts – Most often sheep; humans accidental hosts
  50. 50. Coenurosis clinical signs  Circling, incoordination, dullness, head tilt, blindness, paralysis, separation from herd  Course of disease is 35-45 days after clinical signs develop  Correlation between cyst size and clinical signs
  51. 51. Coenurosis necropsy findings  Pathological finding: necrosis of brain tissues around cyst, hemorrhage  Cyst with scolices inside (hundreds)  Cyst in cerebral hemisphere
  52. 52. Prevention of larval tapeworm infections  Control tapeworm infection in dogs  Prevent dogs from accessing sheep carcass  Dispose of all sheep carcasses  Even apparently sheep may have cysts therefore, disposing of all sheep carcasses is needed for control
  53. 53. Stilezia hepatica  Stilesia hepatica adult tapeworm, lives in bile duct of sheep and goat – Mites are suspected as intermediate host  The symptoms of adult tape worms in sheep and goats may not be too obvious  Economic loss due to liver condemnation
  54. 54. Fasciolosis  Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica – In Ethiopia, F. gigantica is found at altitudes below 1800 m while F. hepatica is found at altitude between 12002560 m  Adult flukes live in bile duct of cattle and sheep  Lymnaeid snail is intermediate host – Along waterways, irrigation canals, swamps
  55. 55. Fasciola life cycle
  56. 56. Fasciolosis- clinical signs  Acute form: sudden death, abdominal pain, massive tissue damage due to migrating larvae  Sub-acute form: anemia, jaundice, liver failure  Chronic form: bile duct obstruction, hepatic fibrosis, anemia, bottle jaw
  57. 57. Fasciolosis diagnosis  Tentative based on history and clinical signs  Confirmation by demonstration of eggs by fecal examination  Post-mortem: flukes in the liver
  58. 58. Fasciolosis control and prevention  Reduction of snails on pastures – Chemicals, biological, drainage  Strategic application of anthelmintics  Grazing management  In Ethiopia, the highlands contain pockets of waterlogged marshy areas. These provide suitable habitats year round for the snail intermediate hosts   The prevalence of fasciolosis in arid and semi-arid areas is very low. In the presence of irrigation in semiarid and arid areas, the prevalence  of fasciolosis is increasing
  59. 59. Black disease and Red Water  Soil-borne Clostridial infections in conjunction with liver flukes  Bacteria proliferate and produce toxins in damaged, necrotic liver tissue  Black disease is caused by toxins of Clostridium novyi Type B  Red Water disease is caused by toxins of Clostridium haemolyticum  Field outbreaks are usually precipitated by invasion of the liver by immature liver fluke
  60. 60. Black disease and Red water  The course of this disease is short and affected animals are usually found dead having shown no signs of illness  Control is by annual vaccination of all breeding stock with a multivalent Clostridial vaccine
  61. 61. Haemonchosis  Infection with Haemonchus Contortus, better known as the barber pole or wire worm  Round worm (Nematode) that sucks blood in GI tract
  62. 62. Haemonchosis  The symptom is anemia, characterized by pale mucous membranes, especially in the lower eye lid; and bottle jaw, an accumulation (or swelling) of fluid under the jaw
  63. 63. Haemonchus life cycle  Single-host parasites  Adult worm lives in GI tract, eggs passed in feces
  64. 64. Ectoparasites  Spend some or all of their life cycle on the skin of affected animals – As a general rule, those that spend entire life on animal are transmitted by direct contact  May feed on the blood, epidermis or hair of affected animals  Cause itching, affected animals often bite, scratch, and rub themselves  Cause damage to skin and wool, reduce wool/hide quality, economic losses  Skin damage allows secondary infections with bacteria
  65. 65. Ectoparasites  Heavy infestations can considerably reduce the condition of the host and cause anemia  May transmit diseases  Diagnosis by visual inspection, skin scraping and microscopy  Prevention by insecticide dips, sprays, pour-ons, powders etc
  66. 66. Ectoparasites in sheep Sheep ked (Melophagus ovinus) Damalinia ovis Sarcoptes scabiei Amblyomma Ctenocephalides Demodex Linognathus africanus Positive sheep (N=175) N % 57 32.6 39 22.3 25 14.3 22 12.6 15 8.6 12 6.6 11 6.3 A. Tadesse et al. Study on the prevalence of ectoparasite infestation of ruminanats in and around Kombolcha and damage to fresh goat pelts and wet blue (pickled) skin at Kombolch Tannary, Northestern Ethiopia. Ethiop. Vet. J., 2011, 15(2), 87-101
  67. 67. Ectoparasites in goats Sarcoptes scabiei Linognathus stenopsis Amblyomma Bovicola caprae Demodex caprae Ctenocephalides spp Positive goats (N=66) N (%) 20(30.3) 6(9.09) 3(4.54) 1(1.51) 1(1.51) 1(1.51) A. Tadesse et al. Study on the prevalence of ectoparasite infestation of ruminanats in and around Kombolcha and damage to fresh goat pelts and wet blue (pickled) skin at Kombolch Tannary, Northestern Ethiopia. Ethiop. Vet. J., 2011, 15(2), 87-101
  68. 68. Ticks  Transmit diseases such as Anaplasmosis, Babesiosis, Nairobi sheep disease, Theileriosis
  69. 69. Sheep ked  The sheep ked, Melophagus ovinus wingless flies, such blood of sheep
  70. 70. Sarcoptes scabiei  The disease caused by these mites is called mange or scabies  Animals with mange often have bald patches and secondary bacterial infections
  71. 71. Lice  Lice are wingless insects with flattened bodies  The sheep louse (Bovicola ovis) spends its entire life cycle on the sheep and causes damage to the wool
  72. 72. Demodicosis  Demodectic mange, Demodex spp  Mites invade hair follicles  Causes small nodules on skin that may develop into abscesses
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Presented by Barbara Szonyi, Tamsin Dewé and Delia Grace at a meat inspectors' training course, Debre Zeit, Ethiopia, 25-29 November 2013.

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