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Consumers do care! Incentivizing food safety through a market-based pull–push approach

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Presentation by Kristina Roesel, Marcel Zwietering, Coen van Wagenberg, Arie Havelaar, Silvia Alonso, Ralph Roothaert, Gemma Tacken, Ruerd Ruben, Kebede Amenu, Laurencia Ouattara, Johanna Lindahl, Srinivasan Ramasamy, Michelle Danyluk, Michel Dione, Yitagele Terefe, Tadesse Guadu, Vianney Tarpaga, Daniel Kaboré, Birhanu Megersa Lenjiso and Delia Grace at an International Food Safety Conference, Nairobi, Kenya, 22 May 2019.

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Consumers do care! Incentivizing food safety through a market-based pull–push approach

  1. 1. Consumers do care! Incentivizing food safety through a market-based pull–push approach Kristina Roesel, Marcel Zwietering, Coen van Wagenberg, Arie Havelaar, Silvia Alonso, Ralph Roothaert, Gemma Tacken, Ruerd Ruben, Kebede Amenu, Laurencia Ouattara, Johanna Lindahl, Srinivasan Ramasamy, Michelle Danyluk, Michel Dione, Yitagele Terefe, Tadesse Guadu, Vianney Tarpaga, Daniel Kaboré, Birhanu Megersa Lenjiso, and Delia Grace Randolph International Food Safety Conference Kenyatta University, Nairobi, Kenya 22 May 2019
  2. 2. Background Animal source foods in SSA • important for human nutrition • production and processing give jobs to millions • single most important cause of (zoonotic) foodborne diseases (FBD) • Previous efforts to control FBD focused at primary production • This neglects risk of cross- contamination closer to the consumer Havelaar et al., 2015 http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1001923 Foods implicated according to FERG (WHO, 2017)
  3. 3. bulking © ILRI/Stevie Mann © ILRI/Ben Lukuyu © ILRI/Apollo Habtamu © ILRI/Brad Collins © ILRI/Stevie Mann © SUA/Fortunate Shija © ILRI/Dave Elsworth Cross-contamination
  4. 4. Gaps in understanding how to manage food safety in informal markets Where to intervene? Intervention on farm Intervention at market How to intervene? Technological (i.e. Petrifilms, tippy taps, disinfectant, mazzi cans) Institutional (i.e. Training and certification programs, dairy cooperatives, butcher associations) Technically effective? Contribution to improved food safety and nutrition? Cost-effective? Will people take up the intervention? How many beneficiaries do we reach?
  5. 5. Pull approach (demand for safe food) Push approach (supply of safe food) Reduced burden of foodborne diseases, professionalizing informal sector, appropriate governance ENABLING ENVIRONMENT Consumers recognize & demand safer food VC actors respond to demand & incentives Inform, monitor & legitimize VC actors (Primary Outcome 2) Build capacity & motivation of regulators (Primary Outcome 1) Consumer campaign for empowered consumers (Primary Outcome 3) Gather baseline information for detailed intervention planning and advocacy Pull–push approach at the market-level
  6. 6. New ILRI project Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso Harar/Dire Dawa, Ethiopia 01/2019-10/2022 4.6m US$ Urban food markets in Africa Incentivizing food safety: the pull–push
  7. 7. Purpose To help to sustainably reduce the burden of foodborne disease in Ethiopia and Burkina Faso by building capacity of food chain actors and regulators to cost-effectively mitigate important food safety risks in poultry meat and vegetable value chains and provide incentives for them to do so by harnessing consumer demand for food safety. Salmonella spp. and Campylobacter spp. Salmonella spp. and enterotoxigenic E. coli
  8. 8. Pull approach (demand for safe food) Push approach (supply of safe food) Reduced burden of foodborne diseases, professionalizing informal sector, appropriate governance ENABLING ENVIRONMENT Consumers recognize & demand safer food VC actors respond to demand & incentives Inform, monitor & legitimize VC actors (Primary Outcome 2) Build capacity & motivation of regulators (Primary Outcome 1) Consumer campaign for empowered consumers (Primary Outcome 3) Gather baseline information for detailed intervention planning and advocacy Key innovation Pull–push approach at the market-level
  9. 9. 1. Estimating burden and cost of foodborne illness 2. Understanding poultry meat and vegetable value chains (including focus hazard levels) 3. Quantitative risk assessment and cost- effectiveness analysis of candidate interventions 5. Design and implement a consumer campaign 6. Empower value chain actors to manage food safety 4. Build capacity and motivation of regulators to manage food safety 7. Impact assessment of pull–push intervention
  10. 10. Expected results • Measurably safer food (significant improvement of hygiene indicators at the retailer level) • Measurable improvements in knowledge and practices among regulators, value chain actors and consumers
  11. 11. Acknowledgements

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