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How the OIE PPP Guidelines can guide the greater involvement of the private sector in livestock disease control in Kenya

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Presented by Christie Peacock, Sidai Africa Ltd at the Follow-up Meeting to Discuss Private sector Participation in Animal Health Services, ILRI, Nairobi, 7 November 2019

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How the OIE PPP Guidelines can guide the greater involvement of the private sector in livestock disease control in Kenya

  1. 1. How the OIE PPP Guidelines can guide the greater involvement of the private sector in livestock disease control in Kenya Christie Peacock, Sidai Africa Ltd Member of OIE Expert Panel on PPPs Follow-up Meeting to Discuss Private Sector Participation in Animal Health Services ILRI, Nairobi, 7 November 2019
  2. 2. What are Public Private Partnerships? “a joint approach in which the public and private sectors agree responsibilities and share resources and risks to achieve common objectives that deliver benefits in a sustainable manner” OIE Guidelines
  3. 3. OIE’s definitions of PPPs in the veterinary domain Transactional Collaborative Transformative Government procurement of specific animal health/sanitary services from private veterinary service providers, usually private veterinarians and veterinary para- professionals. Joint commitment between the public sector and end-beneficiaries, often and a range of other interested private organisations, to deliver mutually agreed policies/outcomes. Collaborative PPPs may be initiated by either the public or private sectors and jointly resourced, Establishment of sustainable capability to deliver otherwise unattainable major objectives. Often initiated by the private sector but sanctioned by, and working with, the National Veterinary Services.
  4. 4. Context  OIE key strategic priority: ensuring the capacity and sustainability of Veterinary Services (ref. OIE 6th Strategic Plan – 2016-2020)  The « OIE PPP Handbook » of guidelines for PPPs, released at the 87th GS  E-learning modules: introductory course available at https://elearning-ppp.oie.int/  4 regional workshops in Africa and Asia to disseminate OIE guidelines  The OIE PPP initiative is integrated into the new PVS (Performance of Veterinary Services) Pathway as one of the targeted support activities
  5. 5. Newly-approved OIE Guidelines on PPPs can help guide new ways in which GOK can work with the private sector
  6. 6. Sanitary mandate • Animal health accreditation private operators • Delegation of official powers to private vets • Autorisation to conduct regulatory tasks Performance of Veterinary Services (PVS) III. Interaction with interested parties Accreditation / autorisation / delegation (III.4) Mandat sanitaire
  7. 7. Sanitary mandate Scope • Vaccination against notifiable diseases • Epidemiological monitoring, surveillance and reporting • Slaughter / meat inspection • Diagnostic services • Certification services • Extension services Mandat sanitaire
  8. 8. Case study : Tunisia Vaccination against notifiable diseases Sheep pox
  9. 9. Case study : Tunisia Vaccination against notifiable diseases F M D
  10. 10. Case study : Tunisia Vaccination against notifiable diseases F M D Vaccination coverage in sheep in 2006 48 %
  11. 11. Case study : Tunisia Vaccination against notifiable diseases F M D Vaccination coverage in sheep in 2018 75 %
  12. 12. Case study : Tunisia Vaccination against notifiable diseases Duration Campaigns reduced from 120 days to 60 days
  13. 13. Case study : Tunisia Vaccination against notifiable diseases F M D COST PER VACCINATED ANIMAL – USD 0,045
  14. 14. Institutional Challenges in Kenya Inadequate resources in the public sector to achieve the required level of vaccination coverage to effectively control disease Perception that all vaccines are public good and should be free Vaccination is sporadic not routine livestock (no effective consistent demand and supply of vaccines which inhibits R&D) Poor timing of emergency vaccinations e.g. severe droughts leads to poor outcomes Lack of adequate cold chain and infrastructure in the rural areas Lack of coordination between public and private sector players and clarity about their roles
  15. 15. Challenges… Livestock keepers (legacy of institutional challenges….) Dependence on free hand-outs Perception that vaccination should only be carried out when there is a disease outbreak Lack of knowledge on the importance of routine livestock vaccination. Perception that vaccination has undesired effects on the livestock e.g. severe reaction, mortality, abortions Lack of understanding of the need for repeat vaccination Perception that one vaccine covers all diseases
  16. 16. How much would it cost to vaccinate livestock in 5 counties of northern Kenya? Public sector Item Kshs Vaccines 1,253,767,641 Logistics costs, including per diems 1,090,777,847 TOTAL COST 2,344,545,488 Private sector Item Kshs Vaccines and logistics 1,539,401,813 Revenues 1,825,035,985 PROFIT 285,634,172 Jobs created 397 Income/month 60,000
  17. 17. How to involve private sector under a sanitary mandate Public Sector PPR FMD RVF CBPP Rabies Private sector CCPP ECF Lumpy skin disease Sheep and goat pox Enterotoxaemia Camel Pox Anthrax Black quarter
  18. 18. Draft PPP for vaccination of livestock in northern Kenya PUBLIC PRIVATE Infrastructure Vaccines Regulatory Framework Staff & management Communication to all stakeholders Finance Staff - mobilization, monitoring Records & data management Control of donors & NGOs Reporting & technology BENEFITS Increased vaccination coverage Relieves public budget More secure livelihoods for Kenyans Reduce use of drugs, AMR down Increased sales, profits and reinvestment Increased external investment ISSUES & RISKS Resistance by vet dept staff Political interference Donor/NGO behaviour Financial risk Disruption from donor-funded national projects
  19. 19. Together we CAN build a world class disease control system in Kenya – Let’s do it!

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