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Low Livestock Funding  Carlos Seré, John McDermott, Steve Staal, Tom Randolph, Delia Grace, Derek Baker 27 July 2011 Why h...
Experts cite four key reasons for low levels of investment in livestock funding  No silver bullets in livestock—issues are...
Experts cite four key reasons for low levels of investment in livestock funding <ul><li>No silver bullets in livestock </l...
Experts cite four key reasons for low levels of investment in livestock funding <ul><li>Few strong advocates=lack of long-...
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Low livestock funding: Why has funding for livestock been so low from key players in the livestock field?

By Carlos Seré, John McDermott, Steve Staal, Tom Randolph, Delia Grace, Derek Baker. 27 July 2011.

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Low livestock funding: Why has funding for livestock been so low from key players in the livestock field?

  1. 1. Low Livestock Funding Carlos Seré, John McDermott, Steve Staal, Tom Randolph, Delia Grace, Derek Baker 27 July 2011 Why has funding for livestock been so low from key players in the livestock field?
  2. 2. Experts cite four key reasons for low levels of investment in livestock funding No silver bullets in livestock—issues are complex, progress is slow, and benefits are harder to measure Weak evidence base on how livestock can benefit smallholders and economic development Few strong advocates=lack of long-term investment from the right players Vocal negative publicity from activists in animal rights, environment, and health 1 2 3 4
  3. 3. Experts cite four key reasons for low levels of investment in livestock funding <ul><li>No silver bullets in livestock </li></ul><ul><li>In livestock, the constraints are multifaceted. Progress is slower compared to crops, due in part to generational issues around livestock reproduction. Increased costs associated with transporting live animals and perishable products limit access to output markets. </li></ul><ul><li>Livestock investments to date have been dominated by perspectives from the developed world, yet these perspectives are not always transferable to the developing world where production environments are more variable, infrastructure is weaker, and the private sector lacks capacity. As a result, previous large investments in livestock were seen to have “failed”, leading many donors wary of the sector. </li></ul><ul><li>Productivity gains in livestock are difficult to measure, and often depend on interaction with cropping systems. This has limited investments by donors looking for “quick wins”. </li></ul><ul><li>Weak evidence base </li></ul><ul><li>Livestock has generally lacked convincing quantifiable evidence on its contribution to: 1) food and nutrition security 2) poverty reduction and 3) economic development. National statistics typically do not take into account backyard production and consumption, thus underestimating the contribution of livestock to GDP. Without convincing quantifiable evidence, the case for investment in livestock is not made. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no clear data on the smallholder role in livestock production. Livestock has often erroneously been portrayed as benefiting only the rich, or as taking away from food security for the poorest. </li></ul>1 2
  4. 4. Experts cite four key reasons for low levels of investment in livestock funding <ul><li>Few strong advocates=lack of long-term investment from the right players </li></ul><ul><li>With few people trained in livestock, and even fewer of those in decision-making positions, livestock investment has lacked strong advocates. </li></ul><ul><li>As a result, there has not been a clear consensus on who is best equipped to invest in livestock. Governments concerned primarily with food security claim that livestock is a private sector issue. Private sector players argue that the business environment in developing countries is too challenging for them to invest. Livestock requires long-term, public goods investments; yet no one has been able or willing to take responsibility for the sector. </li></ul><ul><li>Vocal negative publicity </li></ul><ul><li>Livestock has been subject to vigorous negative publicity from animal rights and environmental groups, many of whom have propagated weak and occasionally false data on feed conversion, water and land use, and environmental impact. </li></ul><ul><li>Vegetarian advocates argue that milk and meat cause health problems, based largely on factors related to overconsumption in developed countries. </li></ul><ul><li>The livestock sector has been slow to respond to critiques, contributing to the hesitation of donors to invest further. </li></ul>3 4

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