2013 – an ILRI Fit for Purpose          Jimmy Smith              Town Hall         4th February 2013
2012 – diagnosis2013 – actionDiagnosis:- Full cost recovery- Efficiency; effectiveness- Execution: on time, on budget, to ...
ILRI and CGIAR research programs                     Dryland Cereals                      Grain Legumes                   ...
ILRI Strategy 2013–2022                                                        ILRI strategy                              ...
Mission and visionILRI envisions a world where all people have accessto enough food and livelihood options to fulfill thei...
Strategic objectivesILRI and its partners will develop, test, adapt and promotescience-based practices that—being sustaina...
Critical success factors:key performance areas
ILRI strategy and the CGIAR ConsortiumGlobal livestock    issues                                      - Livestock science ...
Are we in a matrix?Typically used:    − Both technical (functional, product, or process) expertise and market / customer  ...
Matrix for addressing new Research  realityDDG(Integrated Sciences) CRP 1.1   CRP 1.2   CRP 2   CRP 3.7    CRP 4   CRP 5  ...
Managing the matrix structureThe formal structure alone isn’t enough to make it work well!Some critical requirements are: ...
Matrix  •Skills:Dual/multiple reporting can cause confusion/frustration but:       • Requires understanding by managers an...
The reorganization• Help us deliver BOTH ILRI-specific and CRP  commitments• Flatten the structure, empower decisions• Enc...
PrinciplesAll staff in a primary home (“position”) but most work in severalcross cutting CRPs and some have assigned roles...
New ILRI Research Structure                                                                 Director General              ...
Integrating Mechanisms and Roles                                                       DG              DDG                ...
Next stepsNow – 1st March:     Finalise homes for administrative and communications support - DDGs      working with team...
THANK YOU
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2013 – An ILRI fit for purpose

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Presented by Jimmy Smith at the ILRI Town Hall meeting, Nairobi, 4 February 2013

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  • There MUST be a CGIAR logo or a CRP logo. You can copy and paste the logo you need from the final slide of this presentation. Then you can delete that final slide To replace a photo above, copy and paste this link in your browser: http://www.flickr.com/photos/ilri/sets/72157632057087650/detail/ Find a photo you like and the right size, copy and paste it in the block above.
  • Mention who are decision makersWhat practicesMetrics: Over a 5–10-year time period, livestock-related real income for 2.8 million people is increased by 30%, the supply of safe animal-source foods in ILRI’s target sites/countries1 is increased 30%, and greenhouse gas emissions per unit of livestock product produced are reduced. Simultaneously, in partnership with others, these results are scaled to tens of millions more people.Metrics: Within a 10–15-year time frame, the share of agricultural budgets invested in livestock in ILRI’s target countries are brought at least 20% closer to livestock’s contribution to agricultural GDP. Increased investor contributions to the livestock sector should drive greater representation of livestock commodities in development efforts. Metrics to assess the underpinning changes in attitudes and behaviour will be defined based on learning from taking pilot studies to scale in target countries.Metrics: ILRI has not previously articulated capacity at this level or covering such a diversity of engagement, spanning both institutions and individuals from farmers to local and global decision-makers. ILRI will therefore conduct a baseline assessment before specifying the exact metrics for this third strategic objective; the metrics will specify the number of individuals and key institutions to have developed greater capacity to make greater use of livestock research results—be it for better productivity on farms, improved environmental management or more strategic use of development resourcesILRI’s use of the terms ‘practice’ and ‘decision-makers’ in this strategy encompasses a wide range of scales andgroups. The following are examples of these wide ranges in livestock systems with high potential for growth andin those where increasing resilience rather than productivity is paramount.Where there exists high potential for economic growth in mixed crop-and-livestock systems of developingcountries, ‘inclusive growth’ for poverty reduction and food security can often be achieved through thedevelopment of pro-poor livestock value chains. Here, improving practice refers to the uptake of technologiesand institutional innovations that (1) increase on-farm livestock productivity in smallholder productionsystems as well as (2) efficiencies in their associated market channels, (3) improve the equitable distribution ofbenefits generated through more livestock employment and income, and (4) minimize livestock threats to theenvironment and public health. The men and women decision-makers who adopt these practices include notonly the livestock keepers and market agents who handle livestock and their products, but also the individuals,businesses and government agencies that support the value chain through the products and services they supplysuch as feed, veterinary care and public health regulation.In dryland pastoral and agro-pastoral systems, where harsh and highly variable climates pose considerable riskof loss of livestock assets, both household income and food security can be protected against climate shocks byimproved practices. In the case of drought, these might include making index-based livestock insurance availableto livestock herders, conducting early de-stocking in conjunction with private traders, and making better useof functioning livestock markets. In the case of flooding, which can trigger outbreaks of economically importantlivestock and zoonotic diseases such as Rift Valley fever, better practice might entail more reliable predictiveclimate models used in conjunction with early livestock vaccination campaigns to prevent regional marketclosures able to devastate the livelihoods of livestock producers, traders and others. Changes in practice herewould depend on choices made by decision-makers including local men and women livestock pastoralists andagro-pastoralists, market agents and slaughterhouse personnel as well as those at regional and global levels whoseactions, policies and investment decisions impact small-scale dryland livestock systems and enterprises.Changes in practice thus spans a range of choices made by decision-makers at all levels, from livestock producers(men and women in both small scale and extensive production systems), to market agents and others intimatelyengaged with raising, selling and consuming animals and their products, through to those at local, regional andglobal levels whose development actions, policy and investment decisions impact the livestock sector.
  • 2013 – An ILRI fit for purpose

    1. 1. 2013 – an ILRI Fit for Purpose Jimmy Smith Town Hall 4th February 2013
    2. 2. 2012 – diagnosis2013 – actionDiagnosis:- Full cost recovery- Efficiency; effectiveness- Execution: on time, on budget, to specification- Growth is imperative- New structure necessary --Matrix “imposed” by CRPs- Attracting, retaining and motivating staffAction:- Streamlined operations; OCS- Strategy- New structure- Performance management- Staff and managers skills development
    3. 3. ILRI and CGIAR research programs Dryland Cereals Grain Legumes Livestock and Fish Maize Rice Roots, Tubers and Bananas Wheat Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security Forests, Trees and Agroforestry Water, Land and Ecosystems Integrated Systems for the Humid Tropics Aquatic Agricultural Systems Dryland Systems Policies, Institutions, and Markets Agriculture for Nutrition and Health
    4. 4. ILRI Strategy 2013–2022 ILRI strategy • Consultations throughout 2012 • Final version to BoT November • BoT requestedLivestock Research “tweaks” 15for food security and poverty reduction December 2012 • Launch and implementation early 2013 Better lives through livestock
    5. 5. Mission and visionILRI envisions a world where all people have accessto enough food and livelihood options to fulfill their potential. ILRI’s mission is to improve food and nutritional security and to reduce poverty in developing countries through research for efficient, safe and sustainable use of livestock—ensuring better lives through livestock.
    6. 6. Strategic objectivesILRI and its partners will develop, test, adapt and promotescience-based practices that—being sustainable and scalable—achieve better lives through livestock.ILRI and its partners will provide compelling scientific evidencein ways that persuade decision-makers—from farms toboardrooms and parliaments—that smarter policies and biggerlivestock investments can deliver significant socio-economic, health and environmental dividends to both poornations and households.ILRI and its partners will work to increase capacity amongst ILRI’skey stakeholders and the institute itself so that they can makebetter use of livestock science and investments for better livesthrough livestock.
    7. 7. Critical success factors:key performance areas
    8. 8. ILRI strategy and the CGIAR ConsortiumGlobal livestock issues - Livestock science in Research Programmes ILRI - Livestock science in SRF - Multi-centre “hubs” strategy CGIAR consortium - Priority outcomes at CGIAR Research Programme and Global levels - Opportunities for impact in Research Programme locations
    9. 9. Are we in a matrix?Typically used: − Both technical (functional, product, or process) expertise and market / customer expertise required − Integration across functions and markets is required − Large scope and scale across products and marketsEg:Project based organisations where individuals report into a ‘homegroup’ or ‘practice’, and to one or more projects P re s id e n tt P re s id e n L a rg e L a rg e C o n s u m e rr Consum e G o v e rn m e n tt G o v e rn m e n B u s in e s s B u s in e s s P ro d u c ts P ro d u c ts E n g in e e rin g E n g in e e rin g M a n u fa c tu rin g M a n u fa c tu rin g S a le s S a le s
    10. 10. Matrix for addressing new Research realityDDG(Integrated Sciences) CRP 1.1 CRP 1.2 CRP 2 CRP 3.7 CRP 4 CRP 5 CRP 7 DDG (Biosciences) Skills Team 1 Skills Team 2 Skills Team 3 Skills Team …X Skills Team 4 Skills Team 5 Skills Team ....x Region 1 Region 2 Region 3
    11. 11. Managing the matrix structureThe formal structure alone isn’t enough to make it work well!Some critical requirements are:  Clearly defined organisational framework  Well defined governance processes  Visible, consistent senior leadership and support  Coherent goals and performance measures aligned to corporate strategy and priorities; use a strategic scorecard  Clear accountabilities and authorities  Create ‘doable’ roles that take into account the size and scope of the job  The right culture, behaviours and reward arrangements
    12. 12. Matrix •Skills:Dual/multiple reporting can cause confusion/frustration but: • Requires understanding by managers and implementers alike • Listening, agreement building, collaboration, negotiation, strategic thinking, self- awareness •Communication is key and cuts across every dimension •Keys to success: • Focus on organizational goals • Know your stakeholders • Collaborate don’t compete • Get on the same wavelength • Speak a number of “languages”
    13. 13. The reorganization• Help us deliver BOTH ILRI-specific and CRP commitments• Flatten the structure, empower decisions• Encourage integration and cross-disciplinary work• Integrate through CRPs; and regions• Learn through communities of practice
    14. 14. PrinciplesAll staff in a primary home (“position”) but most work in severalcross cutting CRPs and some have assigned rolesPosition:  Professional and administrative base for performance management, priority setting, critical mass …  Each with a leaderAssigned roles:  CRP focal points  CRP component leaders  Regional Representatives
    15. 15. New ILRI Research Structure Director General Institute Management Committee Dir Human Dir Institutional Planning & Dir Corp Services DGs Rep Ethiopia Resources Partnerships Knowledge Mgmt DDG Integrated Sciences DDG Biosciences Peter Ballantyne Public Awareness Dir CRP L&F Susan MacmillanTom Randolph Capacity Development Integrated Sciences Biosciences Iddo Dror CRP 1.1 Intellectual Property Polly. Ericksen Animal science for sustainable BecA-ILRI Hub Linda Opati CRP 1.2 productivity Iain Wright Appolinaire Djikeng (interim director) Business Dev Unit Alan Duncan (vacant) CRP 2 Food safety and zoonoses Vaccine platform Derek Baker Delia Grace Vish Nene (Director) Institutional Support CRP 4 Delia Grace Livestock systems and the environment Animal bioscience Steve Kemp Regional Reps CRP 5 John McIntire (Interim) Boni Moyo, PurviAn Notenbaert Mehta, Abdou Fall, Livelihoods, gender and impact Feed and forages bioscience CRP 7 Steve Staal Kathleen Colverson Suzanne Bertrand (Interim) Polly Ericksen Research Methods Group Genebank Policy, trade, value chains Biosciences facilities Jane PooleAlexandra Jorge Derek Baker (Vacant)CRP Focal Points Research Support
    16. 16. Integrating Mechanisms and Roles DG DDG Dir Institutional Dir Corp DDG Dir HR Integrated Planning & Services Biosciences Sciences Partnerships Animal science for sustainable BecA-ILRI Hub Public Awareness HR Addis Operations Addis productivity Communities of Practice Food safety and KMIS Operations zoonoses Vaccine platform Nairobi Compensation & Benefits Livestock systems and the Capacity Animal bioscience ICT environment Communities Development of Practice Learning and Development Livelihoods, gender Budget and Feed and forages Business and Communities of Practice bioscience Development Finance Impact Policy, trade, value Biosciences Intellectual Treasury EHOS chains facilities Property Research Methods
    17. 17. Next stepsNow – 1st March:  Finalise homes for administrative and communications support - DDGs working with teams  Finalise plans for operational management committee(s) – DDGs working with teams  Ensure everyone is clear about reporting roles and homes – DDGs with leaders, informing HR, finance, comms,  Project mapping exercise – DDGs (eg clarify homes for Bioinnovate, HoA, LIVES, …..etc….)  Each team to finalise its “description”Remember! People and processes matter! 17
    18. 18. THANK YOU

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