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Awareness of zoonoses among smallholder livestock producers in Ethiopia

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Presented by Hiwot Desta, Biruk Alemu, WoWielandle Kinati, Annet Mulema and Barbara Wieland at the 15th International Symposium of Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics Chiang Mai, Thailand, 12-16 November 2018

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Awareness of zoonoses among smallholder livestock producers in Ethiopia

  1. 1. Awareness of zoonoses among smallholder livestock producers in Ethiopia Hiwot Desta, Biruk Alemu, Wole Kinati, Annet Mulema and Barbara Wieland 15th International Symposium of Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics Chiang Mai, Thailand, 12-16 November 2018
  2. 2. Background • Small ruminants key for livelihoods of smallholder farmers • Close interactions of people with livestock • High level of zoonotic diseases
  3. 3. Division of labour How important are livestock-keeping cultures and traditions in the transmission of zoonoses?
  4. 4. Objectives This study aimed at • Understand the risk of exposure to different zoonoses by different household members • Assess awareness of zoonoses among household members • Identify the zoonosis risks related to division of labour in livestock management
  5. 5. Materials and methods o 92 FGDs conducted with women, men, young women and young men in Oromia, Tigray, Amhara and SNNPR regions o Participatory tools: simple ranking and proportional piling o Disease priorities o Division of labour
  6. 6. Materials and methods Household survey o 430 households involved o 217 men and 213 women interviewed o Questions on zoonoses knowledge o Diseases that transmit from animals to people o Transmission pathways
  7. 7. Results FGDs Disease Priorities • Coenurosis, respiratory diseases, sheep and goat pox, fasciolosis and foot rot were the most important diseases • Only few zoonoses mentioned among important diseases: • Anthrax and Orf by 21 FGD each o 9 men and 12 women FGD mentioned Anthrax o 11 men and 10 women FGD mentioned Orf
  8. 8. Reasons for prioritizing disease  risk of disease transmission to people rarely mentioned as a reason for prioritizing (9 FGDs): more often by women FGD, and FGDs in pastoralist areas
  9. 9. Low awareness of zoonotic diseases was confirmed in the household survey: • 197 (45.8%) of respondents were aware and able to name a zoonotic disease o 100 (50.8%) were men o 97 (49.2%)were women Household survey Awareness of zoonotic diseases and transmission
  10. 10. Awareness of zoonoses 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 consumptionmilk&meat contactwound/feaces contactwithrabidanimal dogbite inhalation/air consumptionmilk&meat contactwound/feaces contactwithrabidanimal dogbite inhalation/air Men Women No.ofrespondents Anthrax TB Rabies Other misperceptions: non-zoonotic diseases identified as risk for human health (resp. diseases, PPR
  11. 11. Division of labour 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 Slaughter Assist delivery Breeding Marketing Herding Coordinate veterinary input Caring for sick animals Cleaning barns Feeding and watering Contribution of men and women to small ruminant management in Ethiopia (score out of 20, other household members not shown) Women Men
  12. 12. Zoonosis and division of labor Brucellosis, Chlamydiosis, Q fever, Anthrax, Orf Campylobacter, Orf Anthrax, Salmonella, E coli
  13. 13. Zoonosis and division of labor Toxoplasmosis, Q fever, Anthrax, Leptospirosis Anthrax, Leptospirosis, Campylobacter Chlamydiosis, Q fever, Anthrax, Orf  The above practices, in addition to poor knowledge, lead to occupational exposure and foodborne zoonotic risks
  14. 14. Anthrax, Brucellosis, Q-fever, Orf, Leptospirosis Children are especially vulnerable: • Less knowledge • Close contact to livestock • Consumption of raw milk
  15. 15. Conclusions • Low awareness of zoonoses in general and the transmission ways • Mode of disease transmission often have gender dimensions in relation to division of labour • There is a need for improving household's knowledge of zoonoses and associated risks • Improve awareness on the risks of transmission and promote behavior change towards zoonotic disease transmission risk o Knowledge alone not sufficient (p.e. Anthrax) o Community conversation as a gender transformative approach promising results so far
  16. 16. Acknowledgements This work was supported by IFAD SmaRT Project, Africa RISING Project, and CGIAR Research Program on Livestock Implemented in partnership with • ICARDA, Regional Research Centers (DBARC, SDARC, YPDARC, BongaARC, AbergelleARC, BakoARC, ArekaARC), Mada Walabu University and Agricultural Offices in the project sites
  17. 17. better lives through livestock ilri.org This presentation is licensed for use under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence.

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