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Key results
Cattle keeping, including for dairy, is an important
livelihood activity of the rural poor in Senegal.
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Improved dairy cattle for enhanced livelihoods and food and nutritional security in Senegal

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Poster prepared by Karen Marshall, Stanly Tebug, Jarmo Juga, Miika Tapio, Ayao Missohou, March 2016

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Improved dairy cattle for enhanced livelihoods and food and nutritional security in Senegal

  1. 1. # Key results Cattle keeping, including for dairy, is an important livelihood activity of the rural poor in Senegal. There are large (up to eight-fold) differences in profit to dairy cattle keeping households, depending on which breed or crossbreed of cattle is kept, and the livestock management practices utilized (Figure 1). The highest household profit was obtained by keeping crosses of traditional Indigenous Zebu with newly introduced Bos Taurus, under good management conditions. This increase in profit was largely driven by higher milk-offtake. Improved dairy cattle for enhanced livelihoods and food and nutritional security in Senegal Karen Marshall1, Stanly Tebug1, Jarmo Juga2, Miika Tapio3, Ayao Missohou4 1The International Livestock Research Institute, 2Helsinki Univeristy, 3Natural Resources Institute Finland, 4Inter-State School of Veterinary Science and Medicine, The University of Dakar End-users and impact Improved livelihoods of the rural poor in Senegal, through the adoption of more profitable dairy cattle breed-types. Enhanced policy on dairy cattle genetic resource use, including in relation to their public artificial insemination program for dairy cattle implemented by the Senegalese government. Enhanced food and nutritional security to poor consumers in Senegal, through the increased availability and accessibility of milk and other dairy productis, should the uptake of new dairy breed-types catalyse further transformation of the dairy cattle value-chain. Figure 1. Household profit associated with the keeping of different breeds of cattle under different management levels#. #For a simulated herd size of eight adult cows and a non-transhumant herd, and taking into account all costs and benefits associated with the household dairy enterprise. Significance of the research results This is the first study comparing household profit of keeping different breeds and crossbreeds of dairy cattle in West Africa of which we are aware. It provides a significant evidence base for livestock keepers, other value chain actors, and policymakers to make better and more informed decisions on dairy cattle genetic resource use. 0 100,000 200,000 300,000 400,000 500,000 Indigenous Zebu Indigenous Zebu Indigenous Zebu by Guzerat Indigenous Zebu by Guzerat Indigenous Zebu by Bos Taurus Indigenous Zebu by Bos Taurus High Bos Taurus Poorer management Better management Poorer management Better management Poorer management Better management Better management Profit(CFApercowperannum) Breed / crossbreed and level of animal management Requirements for dairy cattle keepers to engage in, and optimally benefit from, this technology are:  the availability and accessibility of crossbred semen, via the public and/ or private sectors;  access to credit to support initial investment;  capacity building on management of the crossbred dairy cattle; and  strengthened access to inputs—particularly feed—and markets. As dairy cattle keeping households become more commercially orientated (sell more milk), the control of income from the sale of milk starts to shift from women to men. Thus, as household dairy enterprises commercialise, gender transformative approaches may be required for eqitable benefit to all household members. This poster is licensed for use under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence. March 2016

Poster prepared by Karen Marshall, Stanly Tebug, Jarmo Juga, Miika Tapio, Ayao Missohou, March 2016

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