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Lessons from facilitating dairy producers 
organizations development in East Africa 
Isabelle Baltenweck, ILRI 
10th Afric...
ILRI Mission and Strategy 
 ILRI envisions a world where all people have access to enough 
food and livelihood options to...
Strategic objectives 
• ILRI and its partners will develop, test, adapt and promote 
science-based practices that—being su...
Strategic objectives 
• ILRI and its partners will develop, test, adapt and promote 
science-based practices that—being su...
East Africa Dairy Development 
Project 
Partners 
 Heifer - lead 
 TNS - business 
 ILRI – knowledge-based 
learning 
...
TTRRAANNSSPPOORRTTEERRSS 
TTEESSTTIINNGG 
FFAARRMMEERRSS 
FFIIEELLDD DDAAYYSS 
FFEEEEDD 
SSUUPPPPLLYY 
OOTTHHEERR RREELLAA...
EADD1 achievements 
• About 200,000 farmers registered, although only 1/3 active 
suppliers at any given time 
• Increase ...
Stage gate Tool 
 Stage Gate is a tool to assess Producers Organization progress 
towards sustainability using 11 dimensi...
2014 POs distribution by stage 
and country 
Majority of Kenya POs were in Stages III and IV. In 
Uganda, majority of POs ...
Annual performance trend 
(overall score) 
Kenya PO performance has been on an increasing trend 
while Uganda performance ...
Business PO performance trend 
(2010-2013) 
Generally PO performance declined in 2013. On average 
Kenya POs can be said t...
Production PO performance 
trend (2011-2013) 
There was an 
overall 
improvement in 
performance 
between 2011 and 
2012 
...
Kenya business dimension-wise 
trend across years 
Capital structure improved greatly while FH improved 
marginally. The o...
Uganda business dimension-wise 
trend across years 
Overall there was fluctuation in scores for all dimensions 
between 20...
Kenya production dimension-wise 
trend across years 
• An overall 
improvemen 
t in 
dimension 
score was 
observed 
betwe...
Uganda production dimension-wise 
trend across years 
• General 
increase in all 
dimensions 
between 2011 
and 2012, 
esp...
Stage Gate- lessons from EADD1 
• A useful tool for both the PO and the facilitator to assess progress (or 
lack of), and ...
12 Overall lessons from EADD1 
1. EADD: a facilitator not an implementer 
2. Hub model not a ‘one size fits all’ 
3. Susta...
Acknowledgments to the EADD consortium staff, in particular 
- Julie Kariuki and Joseph Ndwiga from TechnoServe 
- Rakesh ...
Lessons from facilitating dairy producers organizations development in East Africa
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Lessons from facilitating dairy producers organizations development in East Africa

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Presented by Isabelle Baltenweck at the 10th African Dairy Conference, Nairobi, Kenya, 24 September 2014

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Lessons from facilitating dairy producers organizations development in East Africa

  1. 1. Lessons from facilitating dairy producers organizations development in East Africa Isabelle Baltenweck, ILRI 10th African Dairy Conference, Nairobi, Kenya, 24 September 2014
  2. 2. ILRI Mission and Strategy  ILRI envisions a world where all people have access to enough food and livelihood options to fulfill their potential.  ILRI’s mission is to improve food and nutritional security and to reduce poverty in developing countries through research for efficient, safe and sustainable use of livestock— ensuring better lives through livestock  ILRI works in partnerships and alliances with other organizations, national and international, in livestock research, training and information. ILRI works in all tropical developing regions of Africa and Asia.  ILRI is a member of the CGIAR Consortium that conducts food and environmental research to help alleviate poverty and increase food security while protecting the natural resource base.
  3. 3. Strategic objectives • ILRI and its partners will develop, test, adapt and promote science-based practices that—being sustainable and scalable— achieve better lives through livestock. • ILRI and its partners will provide compelling scientific evidence in ways that persuade decision-makers—from farms to boardrooms and parliaments—that smarter policies and bigger livestock investments can deliver significant socio-economic, health and environmental dividends to both poor nations and households. • ILRI and its partners will work to increase capacity amongst ILRI’s key stakeholders and the institute itself so that they can make better use of livestock science and investments for better lives through livestock.
  4. 4. Strategic objectives • ILRI and its partners will develop, test, adapt and promote science-based practices that—being sustainable and scalable—achieve better lives through livestock. • ILRI and its partners will provide compelling scientific evidence in ways that persuade decision-makers—from farms to boardrooms and parliaments—that smarter policies and bigger livestock investments can deliver significant socio-economic, health and environmental dividends to both poor nations and households. • ILRI and its partners will work to increase capacity amongst ILRI’s key stakeholders and the institute itself so that they can make better use of livestock science and investments for better lives through livestock.
  5. 5. East Africa Dairy Development Project Partners  Heifer - lead  TNS - business  ILRI – knowledge-based learning  ABS – genetics & breeding  ICRAF – feeds & feeding EADD1: Jan 2008- June 2013 in Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda EADD2: Dec 2013, for 5 years in Kenya, Uganda and Tanzania Facilitation Private sector
  6. 6. TTRRAANNSSPPOORRTTEERRSS TTEESSTTIINNGG FFAARRMMEERRSS FFIIEELLDD DDAAYYSS FFEEEEDD SSUUPPPPLLYY OOTTHHEERR RREELLAATTEEDD MMEEss VVIILLLLAAGGEE BBAANNKKSS AAII && EEXXTTEENNSSIIOONN HHAARRDDWWAARREE SSUUPPPPLLIIEERRSS CCHHIILLLLIINNGG oorr BBUULLKKIINNGG FFAACCIILLIITTIIEESS The Hub approach
  7. 7. EADD1 achievements • About 200,000 farmers registered, although only 1/3 active suppliers at any given time • Increase in household dairy income in all 3 countries • 82 hubs supported, 17 hubs being ‘graduated’ 124% 164% 64%
  8. 8. Stage gate Tool  Stage Gate is a tool to assess Producers Organization progress towards sustainability using 11 dimensions based on production (5) and business (6).  Each dimension has several indicators and is scored according to perceived importance to dairy business as follows. Aspect Dimension Maximum score (%) Business Governance 28 Value Proposition to Farmers 24 Value Proposition to Market 18 Financial Health 15 Capital Structure 10 Business start-up 5 Production Nutrition 25 Genetics 19 Herd Health 19 Milk Quality 10 Extension 27 Site scores determine stages: Stage 1: below 20% Stage 2: 21% to 40% Stage 3: 41% to 60% Stage 4: 61% to 80% Stage 5: above 80%
  9. 9. 2014 POs distribution by stage and country Majority of Kenya POs were in Stages III and IV. In Uganda, majority of POs were in Stage II.
  10. 10. Annual performance trend (overall score) Kenya PO performance has been on an increasing trend while Uganda performance improved between 2011 and 2012 and later declined between 2012 and 2013. Source: Stage gate data (2010, 2011, 2012 & 2013)
  11. 11. Business PO performance trend (2010-2013) Generally PO performance declined in 2013. On average Kenya POs can be said to be in stage 3 while Uganda POs are in stage 2. Source: Stage gate data (2010, 2011, 2012 & 2013)
  12. 12. Production PO performance trend (2011-2013) There was an overall improvement in performance between 2011 and 2012 Kenya recorded an improvement between 2012 and 2013 but Uganda recorded a decline
  13. 13. Kenya business dimension-wise trend across years Capital structure improved greatly while FH improved marginally. The other 4 dimensions declined with VP market declining most. Source: Stage gate data (2010, 2011, 2012 & 2013)
  14. 14. Uganda business dimension-wise trend across years Overall there was fluctuation in scores for all dimensions between 2010 and 2013. Performance in all the dimensions declined. Source: Stage gate data (2010, 2011, 2012 & 2013)
  15. 15. Kenya production dimension-wise trend across years • An overall improvemen t in dimension score was observed between 2011 and 2013, apart from milk quality
  16. 16. Uganda production dimension-wise trend across years • General increase in all dimensions between 2011 and 2012, especially extension • Decrease in most dimensions, except quality between 2012 and 2013
  17. 17. Stage Gate- lessons from EADD1 • A useful tool for both the PO and the facilitator to assess progress (or lack of), and identify remedial measures • Progress toward ‘graduation’ takes time: on average for the 3 countries, the annual rate of change is 8.3 points per year, which translates into a site reaching stage 4 (or 60 points) in 7.3 years • Sites in Kenya and Rwanda progress significantly faster than Uganda sites. • Kenya sites move on average at the rate of 9.8 points per year, Rwanda 9.4 and Uganda 7.5. • Pre-existing sites progress significantly faster than all the other hub types • With clear understanding at the beginning of the engagement between the facilitator and the PO, this duration could be shortened. This is being tested in EADD2
  18. 18. 12 Overall lessons from EADD1 1. EADD: a facilitator not an implementer 2. Hub model not a ‘one size fits all’ 3. Sustainability 4. Governance / leadership key driver of sustainability 5. Raising farmers equity a challenge 6. Invest in enhancing value proposition to farmers 7. Incorporate hub graduation and exit strategies earlier on 8. Paradigm shift from traditional M&E to MLE system! 9. Increase engagement with private sector 10.Encourage a pro-poor value chain 11.Gender considerations are key 12.Consider systems and scale
  19. 19. Acknowledgments to the EADD consortium staff, in particular - Julie Kariuki and Joseph Ndwiga from TechnoServe - Rakesh Kapoor and Onesmo Shuma from Heifer - Susan Atyang and Egesa Mangeni, CPM Uganda and Kenya - Nathaniel Makoni from ABS- TCM - Josephine Kirui from ICRAF - Immaculate Omondi and Emmanuel Kinuthia from ILRI

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