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Enhancing livelihoods of poor livestock keepers through increasing use of fodder: Ethiopia Report on Output 2 Options for ...
Output 2. Options for effective delivery systems including innovative communication strategies and on farm interventions t...
Activity 1 - Innovative approach for evaluation of year-round feed inventory, assessment and database<br />
Feed Assessment Tool (FEAST)<br />
Originally developed at cross-country workshop in Hyderabad<br />
PRA plus quick quantitative assessment of feed resources<br />PRA<br />Quantitative assessment<br />
Has been extensively improved and a sharing site created<br />
Countries where FEAST has been applied<br />
Dietary composition of dairy cows<br />
Dietary composition of dairy animals  according to season <br />
Khairpura, Bangladesh<br />
Gitanagar, Nepal<br />
Activity 2 - Collection of baseline data<br />
Baseline data<br />Socio-economic baseline data was collected in a total of 560 households in 3 sites. Findings show:<br /...
Percentage of households citing various constraints to high productivity<br />Lack of feed<br />Disease/water - Mieso<br /...
Prioritizing livestock classes for feeding<br />Draught oxen are major demand on feed<br />
Perceptions of importance of income from livestock products<br />No dominant product<br />
Previous forage development efforts<br />Surprising number have tried but currently not present<br />
Also conducted baseline innovation capacity diagnosis<br />Already talked about under Output 1<br />
Reflections on baseline survey<br />We could have done it better!<br />Difficult to where and what to ask at the start of ...
Activity 3 - Evaluation of fodder and seed delivery/input supply mechanisms<br />
Seed supply activities<br />Forage seed supply remains an issue in Ethiopia<br />
Seed supply mechanisms have been the focus of discussion in all 3 stakeholder groups <br /><ul><li>Farmer-to-farmer seed e...
Other actors are also investigating fodder seed supply as a commercial enterprise – Eden Field Seeds <br />Cowpea seed pro...
Fodder Roundtable on seed supply<br /><ul><li>“Fodder has a low adoption rate in Ethiopia, despite efforts, because nation...
NGO’s are major buyers of forage seed in Ethiopia – they pay above affordable levels and this distorts the market..</li></...
Experience from study sites ...<br />Once there is demand for forages, seed supply issues begin to resolve<br />Farmer-to-...
Other input supply activities<br />Other input supply issues have been addressed through stakeholder platforms<br />Supply...
Key messages<br />Preliminary open-minded diagnosis of the feeding/livestock issues (e.g. Feast) useful starting point<br ...
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Enhancing livelihoods of poor livestock keepers through increasing use of fodder: Ethiopia Report on Output 2 - Options for effective delivery systems

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Presentation by Alan Duncan, Kebebe Ergano, Aberra Adie and Abate Tedla at the FAP End of Project Workshop, Luang Prabang, Laos, 15-19 November 2010

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Enhancing livelihoods of poor livestock keepers through increasing use of fodder: Ethiopia Report on Output 2 - Options for effective delivery systems

  1. 1. Enhancing livelihoods of poor livestock keepers through increasing use of fodder: Ethiopia Report on Output 2 Options for effective delivery systems including innovative communication strategies and on farm interventions to improve fodder supply Fodder Adoption Project (FAP) (IFAD Technical Assistance Grant 853)<br />Presentation by Alan Duncan, Kebebe Ergano, Aberra Adie and Abate Tedla at the FAP End of Project Workshop, LuangPrabang, Laos, 15-19 November 2010<br />
  2. 2. Output 2. Options for effective delivery systems including innovative communication strategies and on farm interventions to improve fodder supply<br />
  3. 3. Activity 1 - Innovative approach for evaluation of year-round feed inventory, assessment and database<br />
  4. 4. Feed Assessment Tool (FEAST)<br />
  5. 5. Originally developed at cross-country workshop in Hyderabad<br />
  6. 6. PRA plus quick quantitative assessment of feed resources<br />PRA<br />Quantitative assessment<br />
  7. 7. Has been extensively improved and a sharing site created<br />
  8. 8. Countries where FEAST has been applied<br />
  9. 9. Dietary composition of dairy cows<br />
  10. 10. Dietary composition of dairy animals according to season <br />
  11. 11. Khairpura, Bangladesh<br />
  12. 12. Gitanagar, Nepal<br />
  13. 13. Activity 2 - Collection of baseline data<br />
  14. 14. Baseline data<br />Socio-economic baseline data was collected in a total of 560 households in 3 sites. Findings show:<br />a near absence of improved genetic stock at study sites <br />minimal marketing of livestock products<br />high proportion of feed resources being used to support draught animals. <br />very little planted fodder<br />
  15. 15. Percentage of households citing various constraints to high productivity<br />Lack of feed<br />Disease/water - Mieso<br />X-breds – Ada’a<br />
  16. 16. Prioritizing livestock classes for feeding<br />Draught oxen are major demand on feed<br />
  17. 17. Perceptions of importance of income from livestock products<br />No dominant product<br />
  18. 18. Previous forage development efforts<br />Surprising number have tried but currently not present<br />
  19. 19. Also conducted baseline innovation capacity diagnosis<br />Already talked about under Output 1<br />
  20. 20. Reflections on baseline survey<br />We could have done it better!<br />Difficult to where and what to ask at the start of the project<br />Project evolved to focus on actors – meant we focused more on baselining innovation processes<br />We have some good data on initial target and random households that could be followed up later on through re-survey<br />
  21. 21. Activity 3 - Evaluation of fodder and seed delivery/input supply mechanisms<br />
  22. 22. Seed supply activities<br />Forage seed supply remains an issue in Ethiopia<br />
  23. 23. Seed supply mechanisms have been the focus of discussion in all 3 stakeholder groups <br /><ul><li>Farmer-to-farmer seed exchange on cross-site learning visit</li></li></ul><li>Training on seed multiplication was given in Mieso and Alamata<br />Assessing Rhodes grass for seed harvest<br />Stooking method demonstration for uniform seed maturity<br />
  24. 24. Other actors are also investigating fodder seed supply as a commercial enterprise – Eden Field Seeds <br />Cowpea seed production by Eden Field at Melkawerer<br />NGO’s dominate market<br />
  25. 25. Fodder Roundtable on seed supply<br /><ul><li>“Fodder has a low adoption rate in Ethiopia, despite efforts, because national capacity was never strongly built and the real demand for fodder seed from farmers is still not well quantified. ”
  26. 26. NGO’s are major buyers of forage seed in Ethiopia – they pay above affordable levels and this distorts the market..</li></ul>“Risks associated with the long seed-fodder-livestock commodity chain are significant for potential seed producers who cannot predict future demand”<br />
  27. 27. Experience from study sites ...<br />Once there is demand for forages, seed supply issues begin to resolve<br />Farmer-to-farmer exchange<br />Development of local markets<br />
  28. 28. Other input supply activities<br />Other input supply issues have been addressed through stakeholder platforms<br />Supply of cross-bred cows at DebreZeit<br />AI study commissioned at DebreZeit<br />Input supply mechanisms were addressed at a Fodder Roundtable Meeting in June 2010<br />
  29. 29. Key messages<br />Preliminary open-minded diagnosis of the feeding/livestock issues (e.g. Feast) useful starting point<br />We became rather locked into planted forages – using Feast early on might have widened the array of intervention options and led to faster progress<br />Conventional baseline surveys were of limited use in the way we applied them – need smarter approaches<br />Seed issues tend to sort themselves out provided forages are perceived as valuable by farmers<br />

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