Enhancing livelihoods of poor livestock keepers through increasing use of fodder: Ethiopia Report on Output 1Mechanisms fo...
Output 1.  Mechanisms for strengthening and/or establishing multi-stakeholder alliances that enable scaling up and out of ...
Activity 1 - Identification of project sites, partners and work plans<br />
FAP sites in Ethiopia<br />Atsbi<br />Alamata<br />Mieso<br />Ada’a<br />
Site characteristics<br />Variation in agro-ecology, farming system, key livestock commodities and market access<br />
Site characteristics influencing success<br />
Other site selection lessons<br />Piggy-backing on IPMS sites – useful at start, not so useful at the end – attribution is...
Establishment of stakeholder platforms – the core partnership mechanism of FAP Ethiopia<br />Guiding principles that evolv...
Forages as an entry point – farmer numbers<br />
Forages as an entry point – areas planted (ha)<br />
Innovation processes in Ada’a Ethiopia<br />Technical innovation<br />Institutional innovation<br />Land o Lakes<br />Land...
Meeting log<br />Attendance fairly consistent<br />Some actors always there, some on a needs basis<br />
Format of “innovation log”<br />
Activity 2 - Evaluation of actors, linkages, practices and habits related to fodder innovations <br />
A formal diagnosis of innovation capacity at the 4 Ethiopian learning sites was conducted. <br />A draft manuscript has be...
Innovation diagnosis findings<br />Dominant role of govt. line departments<br />Positive: well developed infrastructure an...
Innovation diagnosis findings<br />Extension service providers lack the skills to provide innovation support services and ...
Action post-diagnosis<br />Establishment of stakeholder groups at learning sites to:<br />Enhance multi-actor interactions...
Activity 3 - Development of Geographical Information Systems on pilot sites in relation to fodder interventions<br />
As originally conceived there was very little activity in this area<br />Why..? Agro-ecological conditions not ultimately ...
Activity 4 - Evaluation of livestock market environment influencing fodder demand, access and utilisation<br />
Rapid market appraisals on fodder as a commodity were undertaken by Ethiopian regional research partners in Tigray and Oro...
Indicative fodder prices in study sites<br />Hailesellassie Amare et al, unpublished<br />
Seasonal fodder market survey<br />Collecting data on fodder prices and quality on monthly basis at 3 fodder markets in Or...
Seasonal fodder market data<br />
Markets: what would be done differently next time?<br />We should have done more work on markets for key livestock commodi...
Key messages<br />Need to link practical technical options and pro-active focus on stakeholder networks<br />Practical tec...
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Enhancing livelihoods of poor livestock keepers through increasing use of fodder: Ethiopia Report on Output 1 - Mechanisms for strengthening and/or establishing multi-stakeholder alliances that enable scaling up and out of fodder technologies

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Presentation by Alan Duncan, Kebebe Ergano, Aberra Adie and Abate Tedla at the FAP End of Project Workshop, Luang Prabang, Laos, 15-19 November 2010

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Enhancing livelihoods of poor livestock keepers through increasing use of fodder: Ethiopia Report on Output 1 - Mechanisms for strengthening and/or establishing multi-stakeholder alliances that enable scaling up and out of fodder technologies

  1. 1. Enhancing livelihoods of poor livestock keepers through increasing use of fodder: Ethiopia Report on Output 1Mechanisms for strengthening and/or establishing multi-stakeholder alliances that enable scaling up and out of fodder technologiesFodder Adoption Project (FAP) (IFAD Technical Assistance Grant 853)<br />Presentation by Alan Duncan, Kebebe Ergano, Aberra Adie and Abate Tedla at the FAP End of Project Workshop, LuangPrabang, Laos, 15-19 November 2010<br />
  2. 2. Output 1. Mechanisms for strengthening and/or establishing multi-stakeholder alliances that enable scaling up and out of fodder technologies<br />
  3. 3. Activity 1 - Identification of project sites, partners and work plans<br />
  4. 4. FAP sites in Ethiopia<br />Atsbi<br />Alamata<br />Mieso<br />Ada’a<br />
  5. 5. Site characteristics<br />Variation in agro-ecology, farming system, key livestock commodities and market access<br />
  6. 6. Site characteristics influencing success<br />
  7. 7. Other site selection lessons<br />Piggy-backing on IPMS sites – useful at start, not so useful at the end – attribution issues<br />Too many?<br />Lack of strong national research partners close to sites<br />Connections with IFAD investment projects not obvious<br />
  8. 8. Establishment of stakeholder platforms – the core partnership mechanism of FAP Ethiopia<br />Guiding principles that evolved :<br />Marriage of technology introduction and enhanced networking. Focus on networks but don’t shy away from supplying knowledge as appropriate<br />Careful judgement on how involved to get at site level – less and less as project progressed – devolution of responsibility in final year<br />
  9. 9. Forages as an entry point – farmer numbers<br />
  10. 10. Forages as an entry point – areas planted (ha)<br />
  11. 11. Innovation processes in Ada’a Ethiopia<br />Technical innovation<br />Institutional innovation<br />Land o Lakes<br />Land o Lakes<br />Eden Field<br />Eden Field<br />Seeds<br />Seeds<br />Crop Grow<br />Crop Grow<br />plc<br />plc<br />FAP<br />Farmers<br />NARS<br />NARS<br />FAP<br />FAP<br />NARS<br />NARS<br />Land o Lakes<br />Land o Lakes<br />Eden Field<br />Eden Field<br />Seeds<br />Seeds<br />Ethiopian <br />Ethiopian <br />Meat & Dairy <br />Meat & Dairy <br />Tech Inst.<br />Tech Inst.<br />Ministry <br />Ministry <br />Farmers<br />FAP<br />NARS<br />NARS<br />IPMS<br />IPMS<br />Ethiopian <br />(extension)<br />(extension)<br />Meat & Dairy <br />Ministry <br />Ministry <br />IPMS<br />IPMS<br />Tech Inst.<br />(extension)<br />(extension)<br />FAP<br />Ministry <br />Ministry <br />IPMS<br />IPMS<br />(extension)<br />(extension)<br />Godino<br />Dairy<br />Godino<br />Dairy<br />Ada<br />’<br />a<br />Dairy <br />Ada<br />’<br />a<br />Dairy <br />Co<br />-<br />op<br />Co<br />-<br />op<br />Co<br />-<br />op<br />Co<br />-<br />op<br />May 2008<br />Seed<br />sourced<br />44 farmers <br />plant on <br />own fields<br />X-bred cows <br />sourced<br />Farmers <br />purchase<br /> seed<br />60 farmers <br />plant on <br />own fields<br />Milk transport<br /> issues voiced<br />Dec 2009<br />11<br />Fodder <br />options <br />identified<br />Dairy co-op <br />formed<br />FAP<br />Farmers<br />Milk transport <br />negotiations<br /> ongoing<br />
  12. 12. Meeting log<br />Attendance fairly consistent<br />Some actors always there, some on a needs basis<br />
  13. 13. Format of “innovation log”<br />
  14. 14. Activity 2 - Evaluation of actors, linkages, practices and habits related to fodder innovations <br />
  15. 15. A formal diagnosis of innovation capacity at the 4 Ethiopian learning sites was conducted. <br />A draft manuscript has been produced<br />
  16. 16. Innovation diagnosis findings<br />Dominant role of govt. line departments<br />Positive: well developed infrastructure and reach<br />Negative: under-resourced, high turnover, technology push culture<br />Lack of effective institutional arrangements for input supply<br />Fodder planting material<br />Cross-bred cows<br />
  17. 17. Innovation diagnosis findings<br />Extension service providers lack the skills to provide innovation support services and manage innovation processes. <br />Research organizations do not currently proactively network with development practitioners and market actors. <br />
  18. 18. Action post-diagnosis<br />Establishment of stakeholder groups at learning sites to:<br />Enhance multi-actor interactions<br />Build capacity in stakeholder interactions<br />Provide a forum for farmers to express demand and for stakeholders to respond<br />
  19. 19. Activity 3 - Development of Geographical Information Systems on pilot sites in relation to fodder interventions<br />
  20. 20. As originally conceived there was very little activity in this area<br />Why..? Agro-ecological conditions not ultimately regarded as the main issue in relation to forage adoption<br />
  21. 21. Activity 4 - Evaluation of livestock market environment influencing fodder demand, access and utilisation<br />
  22. 22. Rapid market appraisals on fodder as a commodity were undertaken by Ethiopian regional research partners in Tigray and Oromia Regions this year. <br />Tigray study: nascent but developing fodder market; rapidly rising prices; increased farmer-to-farmer exchange of fodder<br />
  23. 23. Indicative fodder prices in study sites<br />Hailesellassie Amare et al, unpublished<br />
  24. 24. Seasonal fodder market survey<br />Collecting data on fodder prices and quality on monthly basis at 3 fodder markets in Oromiya Region of Ethiopia (Chancho, DebreZeit, Mieso)<br />Data collection started in July 09 and will continue to the end of the project<br />
  25. 25. Seasonal fodder market data<br />
  26. 26. Markets: what would be done differently next time?<br />We should have done more work on markets for key livestock commodities<br />
  27. 27. Key messages<br />Need to link practical technical options and pro-active focus on stakeholder networks<br />Practical technical options, in our case planted fodder, is the engine that drives stakeholder interest and action – without this stakeholder platforms have limited momentum. Need to avoid purely technology push or purely stakeholder networking – it is the combination that leads to change.<br />Need to allow agenda to move wider than initial entry point: fodder -> marketing, health, breed issues – this is good!<br />

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