Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Crop residue tradeoffs in crop-livestock systems factors, processes and implications

Poster prepared by Valbuena, D., Homann-Ken Tui, S., Duncan, A.J., Gérard, B., November 2011.

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Crop residue tradeoffs in crop-livestock systems factors, processes and implications

  1. 1. Crop residue tradeoffs in crop-livestock systems factors, processes & implications www.vslp.orgBackgroundSmallholders  mixed  crop‐livestock  systems  constitute  most  of  the  farming enterprises  in  developing  countries.  In  those  systems,  crop  residues  (CR)  are fundamental  biomass  resources  used  to  achieve  short‐term  objectives  (e.g. animal  feed,  fuel  and  construction  material)  and  mid‐term  environmental sustainability (e.g. soil conservation). Inadequate agricultural production to cover an increasing demand for CR causes trade‐offs between these short and mid‐term objectives. This  study  aims  at  better  understanding  the  tradeoffs  in  CR  uses  in  contrasting mixed  systems  across  Sub‐Saharan  Africa  and  Asia  (Figure  1)  to  better  target technical,  institutional  and  policy  (TIP)  options  to  improve  livelihoods  without compromising long term system sustainability.Research Questions ‐ What determines decisions about crop residue use?  ‐ What is the impact of those decisions on livelihoods and system sustainability? ‐ What TIP options would enhance farm livelihood and environmental benefits? Figure 1: Study regions and allocation along density gradients (after Valbuena et al. 20111). Regions with high human and livestock populations Regions with intermediate human and livestock populations sustainability Regions with relatively low human and livestock populations TIP Conceptual Approach drivers CR  trade‐offs  are  determined  by  their  production,  demand  and  farmers’ preferences2.  In  turn,  CR  production  and  demand  are  influenced  by  the  spatial  livelihood institutions stakeholder  and  temporal  interaction  of  factors and  drivers  of  both  social  and  ecological  consultation systems. Factors can be roughly grouped into 3 main interrelated components3,4 agro‐ecosystem (Figure 2):  Livelihood:  set of strategies used by individuals and households to make or gain a  living, determined by their capability (e.g. capitals and networks).  Institutions: rules  that  humans  employ  to  organize  all  forms  of  repetitive  and  Figure 2: conceptual approach including factors, processes and implications structured interactions including those with family, farmers, markets, government.  Agro‐ecosystem: spatial  and  temporal  factors  and  interactions  mediating  agricultural  production  and other ecosystem  services  in  the  short  and  long‐term,  Research Approach including biodiversity, carbon sequestration and water storage. Complementary  methodological  approaches  are  being  used  to  study  CR  trade‐offs (Figure 3). Also, to study CR trade‐offs and suggest relevant TIP options, five  Interactions  of  these  factors  largely  determine  major  processes influencing  CR interconnected steps are considered:  trade‐offs, and hence the sustainability of agro‐ecosystems. Sustainability includes  the short‐ and long‐term viability, resilience and adaptability of farming systems in  ‐ To describe CR use and trade‐offs, and link them with farmer livelihoods and  response  to  current  and  future  factors  and  drivers  (e.g.  climate change,  environmental effects, socio‐economic surveys on CR use, drivers, management,  urbanization, market development). perceptions  and  livelihood  capitals  were  conducted  at  both  village  (N=96)  and  household  (N=1960)  levels.  These  data  will  be  analyzed  by  combining  farm  Potential  implications  of  research  to  better  target  TIP  options  to  improve  CR  typologies  econometrics,  bio‐economic  models  and  ex‐ante  trade‐off  analyses  trade‐offs  and  related  processes  need  to  be  explored  with  stakeholders,  in  (livelihood analysis).  particular  farmers.  Additionally,  outcomes  should  target  a  broader  audience,  including farmers, development organisations and policy‐makers.  ‐ To understand how institutions influence CR trade‐offs, and potential options  (e.g.  mapping  value  chain  actors)  and  conducting  focus  groups  discussions (institutional analysis).  livelihood  institutional  surveys ‐ To  analyse  how  current  and  potential  CR  use  and  potential  technical  options  analysis analysis can affect the sustainability of the agro‐ecosystem, specifically soil characteristics  and  agricultural  production,  we  combine  primary and  secondary  data  collection  primary data with ex‐ante farm modelling tools (soil modelling).  modelling focus groups synthesis secondary data ‐ Research  outputs  will  be  discussed  with  different  stakeholders  to reassess  major problems in CR trade‐offs, as well as to better identify TIP options. This will  soil  R4D lead to concept notes for future R4D projects. modelling proposals ‐ A  final synthesis will integrate and link factors and processes to give an overall  Figure 3: research approach view  on  CR  trade‐offs  and  potential  TIP  options  for  diverse  sites  and  mixed  systems. This will represent the transformation and merging of SLP into the new  References:  1 Valbuena D, Erenstein O, Homann Ken‐Tui S, et al. Under review. Conservation Agriculture in mixed crop‐livestock systems: Scoping  crop residue trade‐offs in Sub‐Saharan Africa and South Asia. Field Crops Research. 2 Erenstein O, Samaddar, N, Teufel, N, et al. 2011. The paradox  CGIAR Research Programmes. of  limited  maize  stover use  in  India`s smallholder  crop‐livestock  systems.  Experimental  Agriculture,  1‐28.  3 Fraser  E.  2007.  Travelling  in  antique  lands: using past famines to develop an adaptability/resilience framework to identify food systems vulnerable to climate change. Climatic Change,  83:495‐514. 4 Plummer R, Armitage, D. 2007. A resilience‐based framework for evaluating adaptive co‐management: linking ecology, economics and  society in a complex world. Ecological Economics, 61:62‐74.  The SLP funded project entitled ‘Optimizing livelihood and environmental benefits from crop residues in smallholder  crop‐livestock systems in sub‐Saharan Africa and South Asia’ is conducted by CGIAR centres (IITA, ICRISAT, ILRI,  IWMI, CIMMYT and CIP) and WU Poster prepared by Valbuena D, Homann‐Ken Tui S, Duncan AJ, Gérard B. 2011. CGIAR 

    Be the first to comment

    Login to see the comments

Poster prepared by Valbuena, D., Homann-Ken Tui, S., Duncan, A.J., Gérard, B., November 2011.

Views

Total views

630

On Slideshare

0

From embeds

0

Number of embeds

1

Actions

Downloads

4

Shares

0

Comments

0

Likes

0

×