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 Existence of 3 clusters with unique characteristics and
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 Cluste...
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Characterization of smallholder pig production systems in Uganda: Constraints and opportunities for engaging with market systems

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Poster prepared by Emily Ouma, Michel Dione, Peter Lule, Kristina Rosel and Danilo Pezo for the 4th International Conference of the African Association of Agricultural Economists,Hammamet, Tunisia, 22-25 September 2013.

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Characterization of smallholder pig production systems in Uganda: Constraints and opportunities for engaging with market systems

  1. 1.  Existence of 3 clusters with unique characteristics and constraints, requiring different intervention packages.  Cluster 1: “rural extensive and association-poor producers” - minimal involvement in farmer groups and low investments in the pig enterprise. Major constraint is limited market opportunities.  Cluster 2: “rural intensive and extensive producers”- mixed group comprising both extensive and some intensive producers, display relatively high cooperative behavior than cluster 1. The cluster has similar output market constraints as those in cluster 1.  Cluster 3: “peri-urban intensive associational type producers” - cooperative behavior, close proximity to demand areas and existence of supportive institutions providing inputs and advisory services. Main constraints include lack of breeding services and market information. Sow that has produced piglets targeted for sale by the pig farmer Characterization of smallholder pig production systems in Uganda: constraints and opportunities for engaging with market systems Emily Ouma1, Michel Dione1, Peter Lule1,2, Kristina Roesel1,3 and Danilo Pezo1 This document is licensed for use under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported License May 2013  Over the past three decades pig population has increased from 0.19 to 3.2 million. In 2011, Uganda had the highest per capita consumption of pork in Sub-Saharan Africa (3.4 kg person-1 year-1).  More than 1.1 million poor households (18% of total in 2008) own pigs, mostly managed by women and children as a crop-livestock systems’ backyard activity.  The CGIAR Research Program on Livestock and Fish have identified the smallholder pig value chain in Uganda as a high-potential target to translate research into major interventions that can stimulate pro-poor transformation and generate benefits at scale. 1International Livestock Research Institute, Kampala-Uganda, 2Department of Agribusiness and Natural Resources Economics, Makerere University, 3Freie Universität Berlin, Germany Introduction Objective Methodology  To characterize smallholder pig production systems into typologies in order to assess constraints and improve targeting of technological and institutional interventions.  Data was collected through focus group discussions in 35 villages of Masaka, Kamuli and Mukono districts on a stratified sample of approximately 1400 pig farmers (about 60% women).  Semi-qualitative interview checklist was used and Participatory Rural Appraisal techniques applied to collect data on 3 themes considered important in identifying pig production system typologies: o Farmers’ cooperative involvement, o Affiliation to institutions involved in the pig value chain, o Intensification indicators such as breed type, housing and husbandry practices including iron injection, deworming, castration and sow servicing.  A standard cluster analysis was applied utilizing Ward’s hierarchical algorithm based on squared Euclidean distances and a K-means iterative partitioning. Data collection process Results  The 3 themes used to identify production system typologies reliably differentiate the smallholder pig production system types through their cluster means. Three typologies are evident: Table 1: Extracted cluster solution Cluster 1 Cluster 2 Cluster 3 % in each cluster 26% 60% 14% % in value chain domains Rural production for rural consumption 67 57 0 Rural production for (peri) urban consumption 33 19 0 Peri-urban production for (peri) urban consumption 0 24 100 Variables (Mean and S.D.) Cooperative involvement and affiliation to institutions % of farmers - members of farmer groups 28 (27) 42 (36) 62 (28) % of farmers in pig producer groups 15 (36) 2 (4) 33 (48) No. of institutions involved in livestock value chains 2 (1) 2 (1) 3(1) Intensification indicators % households with improved breeds 52 (18) 58 (23) 81 (8) % of households having pig sties 13 (12) 27(15) 98(5) % of households tethering pigs 69 (27) 41 (28) 8(8) % of households practicing free range 16 (21) 14 (19) 3(8) Husbandry practices % of households giving iron injection 2 (4) 7 (17) 33 (41) % of households servicing sows 0 (0) 91 (13) 0 (0) 0 20 40 60 80 100 Cluster 1 Cluster 2 Cluster 3 %ofhouseholds Cluster constraints associated with input and output marketing Lack of market information Limited pig market opportunities Poor knowledge on input use Poor quality inputs Emily A. Ouma Smallholder Pig Value Chains Development Project (SPVCD) e.a.ouma@cgiar.org ● Box 24384 Kampala ● +256 39-2-081154/5 This project is funded by IFAD/EU  Land is generally not a constraining resource in clusters 1 and 2 (average of 1-2 acres per household) compared to cluster 3 (0.5 acres)

Poster prepared by Emily Ouma, Michel Dione, Peter Lule, Kristina Rosel and Danilo Pezo for the 4th International Conference of the African Association of Agricultural Economists,Hammamet, Tunisia, 22-25 September 2013.

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