Brucellosis:The Bugs and The DiseaseEileen Thacker, DVM, PhD,DACVMNational Program Leader, Animal HealthUSDA-Agricultural ...
The “Star” of the Workshop• Small, Gram-negative, non-motile• Non-spore-forming• Rod shaped coccobacilli• Facultative & in...
History and Nomenclature• Causal relationship between clinical diseaseand organism by Dr. David Bruce in 1887 =Brucella• B...
History and Nomenclature(continued)• Undulant fever from the characteristic wavelike fever (rises and falls)• Lots of othe...
Brucella Species• B. abortus – typically associated with cattle• B. melitensis - typically associated with smallruminants ...
Brucella is NOT species specific!• Humans can be infected with any of thespecies listed before• Not species specific and a...
Clinical Disease in Animals• In animals:– Primarily impact the reproductive organs• Abortions• Orchitis• Infertility– Can ...
Clinical Disease in Humans• In humans:– Low mortality rate – but can be fatal– Severe chronic disease• Fever• Muscle pain•...
Treatment• Humans are treated with antibiotics– Long term and may not completely eliminateorganism– Tetracyclines, rifampi...
Prevention• In humans:– Controlling in animals – covered in the meeting– Milk pasteurization – including for cheese– Care ...
Other Concerns• Brucella was weaponized in the 1950’s– Determined not to be good on the battlefield• Most common laborator...
MUST CONTROL IN ANIMALS TOCONTROL DISEASE IN HUMANS!
Conclusions• Enjoy the workshop• Interact with others• Learn as much as possible• Controlling brucellosis is important for...
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Brucellosis: The bugs and the disease

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Presented by Eileen Thacker at a workshop on an integrated approach to controlling brucellosis in Africa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 29-31 January 2013.

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Brucellosis: The bugs and the disease

  1. 1. Brucellosis:The Bugs and The DiseaseEileen Thacker, DVM, PhD,DACVMNational Program Leader, Animal HealthUSDA-Agricultural Research ServiceBeltsville, MD USAEileen.thacker@ars.usda.govWorkshop: An Integrated Approach to Controlling Brucellosis in Africa, Addis Ababa, 29-31 January 2013
  2. 2. The “Star” of the Workshop• Small, Gram-negative, non-motile• Non-spore-forming• Rod shaped coccobacilli• Facultative & intracellular• Causes chronic disease• Recognized in humans since the 1850’s in theCrimea War
  3. 3. History and Nomenclature• Causal relationship between clinical diseaseand organism by Dr. David Bruce in 1887 =Brucella• Brucella abortus isolated by DanishVeterinarian Bernhard Bang = Bang’s disease• Unpasteurized milk identified as source in1905 by archeologist Themistocles Zammitfrom Malta (earned a knighthood) = MaltaFever
  4. 4. History and Nomenclature(continued)• Undulant fever from the characteristic wavelike fever (rises and falls)• Lots of other names – usually including fever– Crimean, Cyprus, Goat, Neapolitan, Satan’s– Fist of mercy, Scottish Delight, Jones Disease• Neurobrucellosis identified in Saudi Arabia in1989
  5. 5. Brucella Species• B. abortus – typically associated with cattle• B. melitensis - typically associated with smallruminants (sheep and goats)• B. suis - typically associated with pigs• B. ovis -typically associated with sheep• B. canis-typically associated with dogs• B. pinnipediae & B. ceti - marine mammals• B. neotomai & B. microti - rodents
  6. 6. Brucella is NOT species specific!• Humans can be infected with any of thespecies listed before• Not species specific and an individual can beinfected with more than one species!
  7. 7. Clinical Disease in Animals• In animals:– Primarily impact the reproductive organs• Abortions• Orchitis• Infertility– Can cause lameness in pigs– Typically no real apparent illness
  8. 8. Clinical Disease in Humans• In humans:– Low mortality rate – but can be fatal– Severe chronic disease• Fever• Muscle pain• Joint pain and arthritis• Hepatitis• Neurological disorders• Endocarditis
  9. 9. Treatment• Humans are treated with antibiotics– Long term and may not completely eliminateorganism– Tetracyclines, rifampicin, aminoglycosides• Not recommended to treat animals
  10. 10. Prevention• In humans:– Controlling in animals – covered in the meeting– Milk pasteurization – including for cheese– Care in the lab-covered in the meeting– Care when handling aborted tissues or samples fromanimals suspected of being infected• Controlling aborted tissues – dogs, etc.• In animals – will be discussed throughoutworkshop– Difficult – took more than 40 years in the US and stillpockets in Greater Yellowstone area and feral pigs.
  11. 11. Other Concerns• Brucella was weaponized in the 1950’s– Determined not to be good on the battlefield• Most common laboratory acquired infection• Often underdiagnosed in the humanpopulation• Remains a problem in much of the world
  12. 12. MUST CONTROL IN ANIMALS TOCONTROL DISEASE IN HUMANS!
  13. 13. Conclusions• Enjoy the workshop• Interact with others• Learn as much as possible• Controlling brucellosis is important for humanhealth in much of the world• Ask questions

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