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Milking and milk consumption habits and practices among 
smallholder producers in Bihar, India
Introduction
Milk consumpti...
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Milking and milk consumption habits and practices among smallholder producers in Bihar, India

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Poster prepared by Ram Pratim Deka, Johanna Lindahl, Delia Grace and Ulf Magnusson for the Agriculture, Nutrition and Health (ANH) Academy Week, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 20-24 June 2016.

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Milking and milk consumption habits and practices among smallholder producers in Bihar, India

  1. 1. Milking and milk consumption habits and practices among  smallholder producers in Bihar, India Introduction Milk consumption habits and practices of smallholder dairy  producers in Bihar, India, are not well understood.  As they get  direct access to farm fresh milk, their consumption habits may be  different from general consumers, who buy milk from market. This  may either be positively or negatively correlated with the risk of  food‐borne zoonoses.  Therefore we conducted a study to  understand the  milk consumption habits and practices of  smallholder producers. Ram Pratim Deka1, Johanna Lindahl,2,3Delia Grace,3and Ulf Magnusson2 1 International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), India 2Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU), Sweden 3 International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI), Kenya Findings and interpretations • Average milk production 9.1 L/HH; 3.6 L consumed and 15.5 L sold.  Most HH both consume (99.3%) and sell their (87% )milk. • <1% consume pasteurised milk. • Milk mostly boiled before consumption (98% of producers) • Many consume raw milk (15.1%) and raw milk products (38.0%) • Only 5.8% producers aware of brucellosis, leptospirosis and Q‐fever • <2.0% farmers knew these could be transmitted to human.  Most sell (64.0%) or consume (62.3%) milk from animals that are  diseased or under treatment. Only 16.8% producers reported that milk  obtained from sick animals were discarded or offered to dogs/calves. Poor knowledge about food‐borne pathogens might be one of the  reasons behind consumption of raw milk or milk products. In  conclusion, there is a need to further characterize the risks with  milk‐borne diseases in Bihar.  Methods • Cross‐sectional survey of 3 districts of Bihar, India in autumn 2015. • In each district, 1 rural and 1urban block was selected.  • From each block, 38‐44 households: in total, 292 HH.  • All selected HH interviewed using a structured questionnaire • Evaluated by using descriptive statistics. Bihar • One of the poorest and most populous states. • 8.54  million adult dairy animals 41% is buffalo • About 90% dairy farmers are smallholders • Dairy sector is growing @ 4.18%  per annum • Farm hygiene is poor • Little or no effort to improve knowledge and  capacity of value chain actors towards hygienic  milk production, handling, marketing &  consumption Ram Pratim Deka International Livestock Research Institute , Jayanagar Road, Six Mile, Khanapara, Guwahati,  Assam, India,  PIN 781022  www.ilri.org Email: R.deka@cgiar.org , Phone: +91 94355 47126 This document is licensed for use under the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Licence. June 2016

Poster prepared by Ram Pratim Deka, Johanna Lindahl, Delia Grace and Ulf Magnusson for the Agriculture, Nutrition and Health (ANH) Academy Week, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 20-24 June 2016.

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