An integrated approach tocontrolling brucellosis in AfricaIntroduction to the meetingDelia GraceWorkshop: An Integrated Ap...
Research Firsts for Africa1. Earliest lesions compatible with brucellosis foundin hominin skeleton in South Africa, dated ...
African livestock sector today1. Many farmers, livestock and consumers. Highpreferences for animal source foods.2. An impo...
175 million poor livestock keepers,320 million people live in poor livestock keeping householdsSource: ILRI report to DFID...
Africa: 600 million ruminants & pigs,500 million in extensive systems
SSA - 20003%3%4%47%16%3%24%MeatDairyFruit & VegetablesCerealsRoots & TubersDryland cropsOthersSource: Herrero et al 2008Af...
7Importance of women• 1% of African women own land but 10% own livestock• Usually responsible for poultry, animals at the ...
Zoonotic EID events 1930-2012 not from wildlifeZoonotic EID events 1930-2012 from wildlife•75% ZEID emerge from wildlife• ...
9High levels of avoidable livestock disease• Transboundary animal disease• Production disease• Zoonoses• Food borne diseas...
10Dozens or hundreds of vets but millions oflivestock
11Massive under-reporting of disease anddisconnect between human, livestock andwildlife disease surveillance systemsBovine...
Status quo brucellosis in Africa• Over 800 studies• Present cattle, camels, shoats, horses,pigs, dogs, poultry, wildlife• ...
Expectations for the workshop• Evidence on prevalence and impact ofbrucellosis• Share experience on what works and whatis ...
International Livestock Research InstituteBetter lives through livestockAnimal agriculture to reduce poverty, hunger anden...
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An integrated approach to controlling brucellosis in Africa: Introduction to the meeting

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Presented by Delia Grace at a workshop on an integrated approach to controlling brucellosis in Africa, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 29-31 January 2013.

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  • Many poor livestock keepers Implications: many, affordable, animal health service providers
  • An integrated approach to controlling brucellosis in Africa: Introduction to the meeting

    1. 1. An integrated approach tocontrolling brucellosis in AfricaIntroduction to the meetingDelia GraceWorkshop: An Integrated Approach to Controlling Brucellosis in Africa, AddisAbaba, 29-31 January 2013
    2. 2. Research Firsts for Africa1. Earliest lesions compatible with brucellosis foundin hominin skeleton in South Africa, dated toaround1.5 myo.2. In 1921, Bevan, a vet in Zimbabwe first suggestedthat B. abortus could be zoonotic.3. ‘Bakkale’ recognised by Fulani as a diseasecausing abortions & hgyroma. Confirmed asbrucellosis in the 1940s.
    3. 3. African livestock sector today1. Many farmers, livestock and consumers. Highpreferences for animal source foods.2. An important role for women in livestockproduction, processing, retail and food preparation.3. Wildlife uniquely important and presentopportunities and risk.4. High levels of disease, yet low levels of reporting.
    4. 4. 175 million poor livestock keepers,320 million people live in poor livestock keeping householdsSource: ILRI report to DFID, 2012
    5. 5. Africa: 600 million ruminants & pigs,500 million in extensive systems
    6. 6. SSA - 20003%3%4%47%16%3%24%MeatDairyFruit & VegetablesCerealsRoots & TubersDryland cropsOthersSource: Herrero et al 2008Africa: one billion consumers with highpotential to consume more livestock productsEurope - 200010%11%5%31%5%1%37%MeatDairyFruit & VegetablesCerealsRoots & TubersDryland cropsOthersSS Africa: ASF 6% of dietEurope: ASF 21% of dietSS Africa: ASF 6% of dietEurope: ASF 21% of diet2050: 2 billionconsumersDiet compositionDiet composition
    7. 7. 7Importance of women• 1% of African women own land but 10% own livestock• Usually responsible for poultry, animals at the homestead,watering, feeding and looking after sick animals• High involvement processing and sale of ASF• Prepare most food for household consumption• Giving women the sameresource access as menwould add 20-30% tofarm yield (source: FAO, 2011)
    8. 8. Zoonotic EID events 1930-2012 not from wildlifeZoonotic EID events 1930-2012 from wildlife•75% ZEID emerge from wildlife• Major reservoir of important diseasesincluding brucellosis•Wildlife an increasingly scarce resource•Bush-meat important for income and foodWildlife an opportunity and risk
    9. 9. 9High levels of avoidable livestock disease• Transboundary animal disease• Production disease• Zoonoses• Food borne disease• Emerging diseaseYoung AdultCattle 22% 6%Shoat 28% 11%Poultry 70% 30%Source: Otte & Chilonda; IAEAAnnual mortality of African livestock
    10. 10. 10Dozens or hundreds of vets but millions oflivestock
    11. 11. 11Massive under-reporting of disease anddisconnect between human, livestock andwildlife disease surveillance systemsBovine brucellosisPredicted cases annualBovine brucellosisCases reported 2010East Africa 21,104,976 12West Africa 30,646,060 37South Africa 8,492,555 6305North Africa 7,952,853 1073Bovine brucellosis officialreports 2008-2012Bovinebrucellosisaccording tosurveysSource: LRI report to DFID Mapping poverty and likely zoonosis hotspotsAll blank
    12. 12. Status quo brucellosis in Africa• Over 800 studies• Present cattle, camels, shoats, horses,pigs, dogs, poultry, wildlife• Average prevalence 10.5% in animals and8% in people• Reduce production by 8% per annum
    13. 13. Expectations for the workshop• Evidence on prevalence and impact ofbrucellosis• Share experience on what works and whatis to be avoided• Provide forum for conversations,networks, publications, awareness• Lead to plans, proposals and newinvestment in tackling brucellosis
    14. 14. International Livestock Research InstituteBetter lives through livestockAnimal agriculture to reduce poverty, hunger andenvironmental degradation in developing countrieswww.ilri.org

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