Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Drink Wise, Age Well
Sharing our learning
Drink Wise, Age Well Legacy Workshop 1:
Sharing our Learning
Objectives of workshops:
● Raise awareness of DWAW’s approach...
Drink Wise, Age Well Legacy Workshop 1:
Sharing our Learning
Agenda for today
● Welcome, intros, frame
● Key learnings fro...
Why is alcohol and ageing an issue
In both England and Scotland, 55-64 year olds drink more on average than any
other age ...
Why older adults are at risk of alcohol harm
Less able to metabolise alcohol and more likely to have underlying health iss...
Programme model and locations
Evaluation design and methodology
The findings are based on an approach called Contribution Analysis
Contribution Analysis...
Four themes of impact
Increasing knowledge, awareness and profile of the issue
Increasing Resilience
Supporting people to ...
Increasing knowledge, awareness and profile of the issue: Background
Our baseline community survey found low levels of kno...
Increasing knowledge, awareness and profile of the issue: Activities
Media advocacy, social media campaigns and digital
en...
Increasing knowledge, awareness and profile of the issue: key findings
15 million people were potentially exposed to media...
The session facilitator gave out the
measures … so there was wee measuring
glasses … I still use that for my wine. You
can...
Increasing Resilience: Background
Resilience is the ability to adapt positively to stressful life
circumstances
Being resi...
Increasing resilience: activities
A structured resilience group course Live Wise, Age Well to
increase individual resilien...
Increasing resilience: key findings Live Wise, Age Well Group
The majority of participants entered and exited with the sam...
Increasing resilience: key findings
For those participating in social activities there were improvements in
Emotional heal...
When I was by myself and secret drinking,
you do feel extremely lonely. Very, very
lonely and you feel as though you’re th...
Before I started doing this voluntary work
[running a Drink Wise, Age Well crafts group],
I suffered really badly with dep...
Supporting people to make changes in their alcohol use: background
Research suggests that:-
Alcohol problems are less like...
Supporting people to make changes in their alcohol use: activities
Screening and alcohol brief intervention in wider commu...
Supporting people to make changes in their alcohol use: findings
75% had a score indicating hazardous or harmful alcohol u...
Supporting people to make changes in their alcohol use: findings
Alcohol Interventions:
76% reduced their alcohol consumpt...
She [alcohol intervention service worker] used to
come to the house and take me down to [peer
support group meetings] at t...
In rough terms, I would possibly do 60-70 units a
week… I'm now down to sort of 25-30 units, which is
still over the recom...
Reducing stigma and discrimination: background
Stigma and discrimination occurs across a range of settings
including healt...
Reducing stigma and discrimination: activities
Creating a UK wide social media campaign to reduce stigma
and to highlight ...
Reducing stigma and discrimination: key findings
Training challenged stereotypes that some professionals held of people wi...
The public anti-stigma
campaign reached > 1
million people
83% believe society
should treat older adults
with alcohol prob...
Experts by experience
John Nelson
Sarah Lowton
The Covid Effect
0ver 50% are drinking at a level that could cause health
problems now or in the future, with nearly one i...
Legacy
Online Knowledge Exchange Workshops to nearly
500 participants offering pledges to improve
practice
Advocacy group:...
5 MIN BREAK
Calling Time for Change four nation charters- recommendations for
providers, commissioners, policy makers
We believe
Everyone has a human right to age well with dignity.
Older adults should be able to live the best life they can...
Charter for England - Four themes
PREVENTION: life events in later life can be a trigger
WORKING TOGETHER: communities are...
Group exercise
Prevention
Targeted public health campaigns that will help older adults and their families
to understand how life events c...
Communities working together
Workplaces to promote alcohol-free social events and wellbeing initiatives
Pubs and local clu...
Providing treatment - part 1
Alcohol treatment services to embed a social prescribing model into their provision to
tackle...
Providing treatment part 2
Health and wellbeing boards to conduct joint strategic needs assessments
Commissioners and fund...
National strategies
National prevention strategies and interventions that raise awareness around
alcohol across the life c...
Drink Wise, Age Well  Legacy Workshop 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Drink Wise, Age Well Legacy Workshop 1

Session 1 of our Workshop series: DWAW - Working together to reduce alcohol harm in the over 50s, on Wednesday 20 January, hosted by the International Longevity Centre (ILC) and Drink Wise, Age Well.
The purpose of these workshops is to:
• Raise awareness and generate understanding of this multi-agency, four-nation approach to community-based alcohol harms reduction for the over 50s
• Share key findings from the programme evaluation
• Provide insights and inspiration based on DWAW learning and stories of lived experience
• Engage stakeholder organisations to the issue of harmful drinking in the over 50’s
• Collectively explore actions that could be taken at a system level

Reducing harmful drinking in the over 50s is vital in preventing the onset of long-term health conditions and the devastating effects of addiction.
However, it is a complex issue that requires insight and expertise from a range of sectors.
These workshops will therefore bring together a diverse range of organisations, each with a key role to play in addressing this problem. Participating organisations include those working with issues of health, ageing, policy and addiction.
Given the rise in home alcohol consumption, particularly within this age group, as a result of coronavirus lockdowns and ongoing restrictions, not to mention redundancies and recession, this is a critical time to be convening this conversation.
The first workshop will principally be hearing and learning from the experience of the DWAW programme, whilst also exploring other initiatives, programmes and organisations that are actively addressing this problem. In the second and third workshops we will move on to exploring further system-level strategies and interventions that may be needed.

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Drink Wise, Age Well Legacy Workshop 1

  1. 1. Drink Wise, Age Well Sharing our learning
  2. 2. Drink Wise, Age Well Legacy Workshop 1: Sharing our Learning Objectives of workshops: ● Raise awareness of DWAW’s approach to community-based alcohol harm reduction for the over 50s ● Share key findings from the programme evaluation ● Provide insights based on DWAW learning and stories of lived experience ● Engage stakeholder organisations to the issue of harmful drinking in the over 50’s ● Collectively explore further actions that could be taken at a system level
  3. 3. Drink Wise, Age Well Legacy Workshop 1: Sharing our Learning Agenda for today ● Welcome, intros, frame ● Key learnings from the DWAW programme ● Advocacy group: insights from lived experience ● Where we are now: 2021 and beyond ● The “Calling Time” Charter: assessing what’s being done
  4. 4. Why is alcohol and ageing an issue In both England and Scotland, 55-64 year olds drink more on average than any other age group and are the most likely to exceed the UK drinking guidelines. In England adults aged 65+ are most likely to drink everyday In England, alcohol-specific death rates have risen since 2001, with these rises occurring almost exclusively between the ages of 55 and 85. In 2018 the highest rate of alcohol-specific deaths was in ages 55-64
  5. 5. Why older adults are at risk of alcohol harm Less able to metabolise alcohol and more likely to have underlying health issue that may be exacerbated More likely to be on medications which alcohol can affect Greater structural and cognitive changes caused by alcohol More susceptible to imbalance leading to increased risk of falls Can have an impact on menopausal symptoms Increased risk of social isolation and drinking at home alone
  6. 6. Programme model and locations
  7. 7. Evaluation design and methodology The findings are based on an approach called Contribution Analysis Contribution Analysis helps to assess the impact (contribution) of programmes where changes are likely to be the result of multiple contributory factors We examined reports, literature and routinely collected data produced by Drink Wise, Age Well and the data we had gathered from service users, staff and professional stakeholders
  8. 8. Four themes of impact Increasing knowledge, awareness and profile of the issue Increasing Resilience Supporting people to make changes to their alcohol use Reducing stigma and discrimination
  9. 9. Increasing knowledge, awareness and profile of the issue: Background Our baseline community survey found low levels of knowledge about alcohol in people aged over 50 For example, 74% of people were unable to correctly identify the UK government drinking guidelines and 23% wouldn’t know where to get help if they were experiencing an alcohol problem Other research has demonstrated that professionals may lack the knowledge and skills to identify and respond to alcohol use in this age group
  10. 10. Increasing knowledge, awareness and profile of the issue: Activities Media advocacy, social media campaigns and digital engagement to raise awareness and encourage behaviour change Development of knowledge and skills in frontline professionals (e.g. the police, fire and rescue, NHS, social care workers) to recognise and respond to problem drinking in the over 50’s Delivering alcohol awareness workshops to over 50’s in multiple community settings
  11. 11. Increasing knowledge, awareness and profile of the issue: key findings 15 million people were potentially exposed to media messaging about the DWAW survey. In the month that followed there was a 187% increase in people seeking help 90% of professionals who received training said they planned to make changes to their practice 92% workshop attendees were able to correctly identify the recommended drinking guidelines and 93% said they would know where to get help However, people from minority ethnic groups were underrepresented
  12. 12. The session facilitator gave out the measures … so there was wee measuring glasses … I still use that for my wine. You can keep a better track of what you’re drinking. You think you’re only having one glass of wine but…” Workshop participant
  13. 13. Increasing Resilience: Background Resilience is the ability to adapt positively to stressful life circumstances Being resilient is especially important in older age which can be a challenging time of life, and includes changes such as retirement, bereavement or reduced physical mobility There are three domains of resilience: Individual (personal resilience) Social (having empowering relationships with others) Environmental (having access to adequate resources, including care and material resources)
  14. 14. Increasing resilience: activities A structured resilience group course Live Wise, Age Well to increase individual resilience in people aged over 50 One-to-one support for individuals and their families with a focus on building coping strategies and self-worth A wide range of social activities and mutual aid groups to build connections and strengthen community involvement Recruiting volunteers aged over 50, many with lived experience, to develop their own skills and support others
  15. 15. Increasing resilience: key findings Live Wise, Age Well Group The majority of participants entered and exited with the same level of resilience But of those reporting a low level of resilience at entry, 48% reported normal levels of resilience by the end One quarter of those who were higher risk drinkers, reduced their alcohol use at the end of the group intervention
  16. 16. Increasing resilience: key findings For those participating in social activities there were improvements in Emotional health 79% Sense of Purpose 82% Relationships 80% Of those who drank alcohol, 38% reported that their alcohol use had reduced Only a quarter of people who took part in the resilience interventions were men Some not comfortable with group or unable to attend
  17. 17. When I was by myself and secret drinking, you do feel extremely lonely. Very, very lonely and you feel as though you’re the only person that’s going through it. So to be able to get out and about, meet people with shared experiences, it’s what’s helped me the most.” Resilience Participant
  18. 18. Before I started doing this voluntary work [running a Drink Wise, Age Well crafts group], I suffered really badly with depression. Some days I never used to go out of house or anything. In fact I didn't even bother getting ready and I stayed in bed most of the time.” Resilience Participant
  19. 19. Supporting people to make changes in their alcohol use: background Research suggests that:- Alcohol problems are less likely to be identified in older adult’s Older adults have better outcomes in alcohol services specifically for their age group and some people prefer them Older adults with alcohol problems have high levels of undiagnosed cognitive impairment which can make it difficult for them to engage and benefit from alcohol treatment
  20. 20. Supporting people to make changes in their alcohol use: activities Screening and alcohol brief intervention in wider community and public settings Alcohol interventions focus on age-related factors, provide flexibility with location and times Cognitive screening to provide participants with the suitable level of support Support for families to adopt positive coping strategies and to assist their loved ones to make positive changes Age-specific peer support sessions
  21. 21. Supporting people to make changes in their alcohol use: findings 75% had a score indicating hazardous or harmful alcohol use Two thirds of those who received SBI hadn’t been asked about alcohol in the last 12 months 43% said they intended to make changes to their drinking Among those who received the alcohol intervention service, more than a third said it was the first time they had received alcohol treatment The majority of people who received the online webchat service said it was their first time accessing any support
  22. 22. Supporting people to make changes in their alcohol use: findings Alcohol Interventions: 76% reduced their alcohol consumption but almost half were still drinking above the recommended drink limits at discharge compared to 80% at assessment No difference in outcomes between DWAW and generic alcohol service however only 3% disengaged from DWAW compared to 10% in alcohol services 74% improved their wellbeing 45% reduced their anxiety and depression and there were marked improvements in cognitive functioning
  23. 23. She [alcohol intervention service worker] used to come to the house and take me down to [peer support group meetings] at that time because I wouldn’t go on a bus, or [I was] frightened to go outside … I feel as if, through their help … I’m getting more confident, and I was starting to go on a bus myself and go to the [peer support group] meetings.” Programme participant
  24. 24. In rough terms, I would possibly do 60-70 units a week… I'm now down to sort of 25-30 units, which is still over the recommended issue… I do want to reduce that… and the way I’ve reduced it, I don’t have foggy mornings anymore… [and I don’t] get up in the morning and have a drink…” Programme participant
  25. 25. Reducing stigma and discrimination: background Stigma and discrimination occurs across a range of settings including health and social care, employment, housing and policing, as well as in relationships with family and friends and in the general community Fear of stigma and discrimination can prevent people seeking social support, help or treatment for the problems they are experiencing with alcohol Older adults may be subject to additional stigma because of their age, resulting in overlapping layers of discrimination
  26. 26. Reducing stigma and discrimination: activities Creating a UK wide social media campaign to reduce stigma and to highlight age-related factors that can lead to increased alcohol use Support people via 1-2-1 and groups to challenge their own self-stigma and wider discrimination Ensuring that the voices of people with lived experience are heard in policy discussions about issues that directly affect their lives Publication of a report on age discrimination in alcohol policy practice and research
  27. 27. Reducing stigma and discrimination: key findings Training challenged stereotypes that some professionals held of people with alcohol problems The most successful stigma-reduction activities targeted people with alcohol problems - new sense of purpose and self-identity outside their alcohol problem No evidence that the programme reduced stigma among family members Stigma-reduction impact may be short-term Public Health England removed age cuts offs from its online alcohol rehab directory
  28. 28. The public anti-stigma campaign reached > 1 million people 83% believe society should treat older adults with alcohol problem with more tolerance
  29. 29. Experts by experience John Nelson Sarah Lowton
  30. 30. The Covid Effect 0ver 50% are drinking at a level that could cause health problems now or in the future, with nearly one in four classed as high risk or possibly dependent. 1 in 3 children with parent aged over 50 worried about their alcohol use since lockdown Remote service provision should be provided in addition to, rather than instead of, face-to-face support for older adults.
  31. 31. Legacy Online Knowledge Exchange Workshops to nearly 500 participants offering pledges to improve practice Advocacy group: workshops, research, social cafes We Are With You digital tools- alcohol health checker Age Inclusive Model Service (AIMS) audit toolkit for services Launched our over 50s Alcohol Helpline
  32. 32. 5 MIN BREAK
  33. 33. Calling Time for Change four nation charters- recommendations for providers, commissioners, policy makers
  34. 34. We believe Everyone has a human right to age well with dignity. Older adults should be able to live the best life they can, free from the negative effects and harms caused by alcohol. Everyone should have access to factual and credible information to make informed choices about their alcohol use as they age. Alcohol treatment and support must be easily accessible for all ages and stages in life.
  35. 35. Charter for England - Four themes PREVENTION: life events in later life can be a trigger WORKING TOGETHER: communities are at the heart of reducing alcohol harm PROVIDING TREATMENT: it’s never too late to change NATIONAL STRATEGIES and best practice
  36. 36. Group exercise
  37. 37. Prevention Targeted public health campaigns that will help older adults and their families to understand how life events can lead to increased alcohol use, and how alcohol use can affect healthy ageing. A wider social prescribing model that ensures older adults are given opportunities to make social connections in their communities to enhance their health and wellbeing. Recognition that carers for dependent family members can become very isolated, The roll-out of a brief interventions skills programme
  38. 38. Communities working together Workplaces to promote alcohol-free social events and wellbeing initiatives Pubs and local clubs to offer alternative alcohol -free spaces Community projects such as older adults day centres or dementia cafes to host alcohol prevention and awareness events to normalise the conversation in wider settings. Recognition that older adults living in rural communities may find it particularly difficult to access suport
  39. 39. Providing treatment - part 1 Alcohol treatment services to embed a social prescribing model into their provision to tackle the issues that might lead to increased alcohol use as people age. Alcohol services to embrace meaningful co-production and develop pathways for volunteering and employment opportunities Alcohol services to be designed in a way that makes them accessible to older adults and is person-centred, and not time bound. Alcohol treatment services to offer peer support meetings for older age groups to increase confidence and mutual support.
  40. 40. Providing treatment part 2 Health and wellbeing boards to conduct joint strategic needs assessments Commissioners and funders to monitor access to alcohol services by age. The treatment workforce to access value based training. It is important that workers explore their feelings and attitudes around older adults. Unjustified age cut-offs or ageist practice in alcohol projects, and treatment services to be challenged on the grounds of age discrimination.
  41. 41. National strategies National prevention strategies and interventions that raise awareness around alcohol across the life course. NICE to develop best practice guidelines for supporting older adults with substance misuse problems. Department of Health and Social Care and the Home Office to ensure that the needs of our ageing population are specifically recognised with tailored solutions in the UK Government Alcohol Strategy

×