Understanding wellbeing in old
age across the world
Monday 31st March 2014
This event is kindly supported by Age Internati...
Baroness Sally Greengross
Chief Executive
ILC-UK
This event is kindly supported by Age International
#worldwellbeing
Chris Roles
Director
Age International
This event is kindly supported by Age International
#worldwellbeing
Jessica Watson
Policy and Communications Manager
ILC-UK
This event is kindly supported by Age International
#worldwellbeing
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank
dedicated to addressing issues of longevi...
Jane Scobie
Director of Communications and Advocacy
Helpage International
This event is kindly supported by Age Internatio...
Jane Scobie
Director of Advocacy and Communications
www.globalagewatch.org
HelpAge International
Our vision is a world in which older people
fulfill their potential to lead
dignified, active, healt...
Global AgeWatch Index
• First-ever measure of quality of life and well-
being of older people around the world
• Uses the ...
Global AgeWatch Index -
overall rankings
Story behind the Index, meet Katerina
• No formal education
• No pension
• Works very hard
• Ill but can‟t afford
healthca...
Older people are
missed out of
data collection
and analyses
They are
invisible to
policy makers
Who sees Katerina?
Proportion of population aged 60+
in 2012 and 2050
What will
make a
difference
Why an Index?
• Start process
• To provide a framework that countries can use to
explore their response to ageing; goes be...
What concept underlies the Index?
• The Index captures multidimensional aspects of quality of
life and well-being of older...
Four domains and thirteen
indicators
Global Rankings
Insufficient data coverage for
Africa, Middle East and Caribbean –
close to 100 countries missing
Evidence generated by the Index
• History counts - progressive social welfare policies for
all their citizens across the l...
Regional results: Asia (selected countries)
How the Index is being used
• 60,000 downloads, 3000 media hits 62
countries
• National research on quality of life older
...
Partnerships
• World Bank: provision of data on poverty
among older people
• UN Women: work around data, advocacy and
rese...
Next steps
• Update and publish Index annually on 1
October, 2014 focus on income security
• Evidenced based report and po...
Next steps
Please use it and help us create
a better world for everyone
Thank you!
Tim Fassam
Head of Public Affairs
Prudential
This event is kindly supported by Age International
#worldwellbeing
Please follow the below link for information on the
Global Aging Preparedness Project
http://gapindex.csis.org/
This event...
Panel Debate and Q&A
This event is kindly supported by Age International
#worldwellbeing
Lunch
This event is kindly supported by Age International
#worldwellbeing
Panel Debate
Rodd Bond, Director, Netwell Centre
This event is kindly supported by Age International
#worldwellbeing
Improving the Well-Being of Older People
Considerations on a Capability Approach to ‘Ageing and Justice’.
31th March 2014
...
Settlement Global economy
Demographic
change
Climate
change
Our
Future
Sustainability context Connection / belonging
Resource
Reconfiguration
Service quality
Front-line Empower
organisational
edge (client) for
greater self-
management
Equi...
Care & Cure
Private services
Family
1. Cross sectoral alignments
2. Pathway integration
Person
Public services
Community/V...
Learning Productive Leisure
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 10090
0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 10090
Economics of longer living A c...
Connection:
Rural transport & urban mobility
Confidence:
Sense of safety & security
Empowerment:
Better access to better i...
Data sources – Gallop
doesn’t do it ?
Emerging measures / connectivity
Digital inclusion ?
Possibly conflicting
directions...
Capability Approach
‘When evaluating well-being ( a flourishing life ) – the most important thing is to consider what peop...
We need a framework
• Our problems evaluating the implementation of existing and
innovative policies and practices (measur...
Panel Debate
Dr Jack Watters, Vice President of External
Affairs, Pfizer
Ken Bluestone, Policy Adviser, Age
International
...
Panel Debate and Q&A
This event is kindly supported by Age International
#worldwellbeing
Understanding wellbeing in old
age across the world
Monday 31st March 2014
This event is kindly supported by Age Internati...
31Mar14 - Understanding wellbeing in old age across the world: lessons from across the “developing/developed” country divi...
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31Mar14 - Understanding wellbeing in old age across the world: lessons from across the “developing/developed” country divide - ppt presentation

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Global ageing is calling into question the differences between developed and developing countries.

Developing countries are seeing a growth of non-communicable diseases usually associated with affluence in wealthier countries: obesity; diabetes; cancer; heart disease; dementia; among others.

Urbanisation is posing significant challenges and opportunities, but countries like China are also seeing vast areas of rural hinterland with an increasingly ageing population.

At the same time, a complex picture of wealth and financial satisfaction is emerging across the world. The global economy is more heavily interlinked than ever before with the future economic success of the UK and wealthier countries likely to rely on the success of development in lower and middle income countries. There is a very positive story to tell about wellbeing in developing countries which is rarely heard.

Across the world, transitions are varying in pace, but a common factor facing most parts is ageing.

Focussing on ageing makes good development sense, a fact that policymakers are increasingly recognising. There has been growing interest from academics and policy makers in exploring how to best compare the impact of ageing in a global context.

HelpAge International's Global AgeWatch Index ranks countries by how well their ageing populations are faring.

The EC and UN supported Active Ageing Index (AAI) is an analytical tool that aims to help policy makers produce policies for active and healthy ageing.

The Global Aging Preparedness Index (GAP) was developed by the Center for Strategic and International Studies’ with financial support from Prudential plc. The GAP Index seeks to inform the policy debate about global aging and focus attention on the need for constructive reform.

Following introductory remarks from Chris Roles of Age International, Jessica Watson of ILC-UK presented new work using a major international dataset – the World Values Survey – about levels of self-reported financial satisfaction. Analysing data from 56 countries over six continents, these findings throw new light on levels of financial satisfaction within and between countries. This analysis has been made possible by the ESRC SDAI initiative

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  • Older people include those over 50This analysis looked at 56 countries as not all countries are represented in all waves. There are also a couple of tables which exclude countries that have very small bases.
  • Survival and Well Being as related to per capita GNP.Source: R. Inglehart, Modernization and Postmodernization (Princeton, 1997).Authority and Value Systems. Source: R. Inglehart, Modernization and Postmodernization (Princeton, 1997).Mapping Authority and Survival or Well Being.Source: R. Inglehart, Modernization and Postmodernization (Princeton, 1997).
  • Able (and willing)Enabled to work covers health support / age discrimination / suitable positions available
  • As a thought experiment – had a look at the financial satisfaction figures from these analyses against a measure of financial provision from some countries.
  • Big disclaimers – this isn’t solid analysis, these are different datasets, this is only one pensions index, there is only a small number of countries represented here.There is a relationship hereSo is/should a simple message about improving state pension provision play a big part of improving financial satisfaction?
  • Although massive differences by country. Exceptions include many African, Asian, South American countriesFormer Communist countries – poor/ pessimistic/ peevedYou tend to see over-optimism in self reported health as people age – “I’ve got a hip, and a knee, and cataracts and I’m on blood thinners but my health is great compared to my friend/sister/neighbour/ for my age”. So are we seeing something similar in financial satisfaction reporting?
  • This is me (you may want to point to your countries position)Shows how people in older age in these countries are faringCall for increased action by all actors family, community, private and public sectorChange is needed in social attitudes, employment practice, government practice
  • Ethiopia Have had no formal education so is unable to read or write, wants more but cannot because of her ageIs looking after grandchildren but receives no pensionContinues to work but her contribution to the labour market is not recognisedHas chronic fatigue and aching bones but no access to healthcareIs excluded from community meetings because of her age.By 2050 more than a fifth of the global population will be over 60. It is therefore imperative for governments to make provisions for their expanding older populations – to create a better world for older people now and for today’s young people as they age.
  • But older people are missed out for data collection and analyses, leading to neglect of older people in social and economic policies and programmes. Therefore they are not included in policies and civil society programmes.Being old is stigmatised. Older people are discriminated against. They are invisible.
  • Ending invisibility of older women and men for ever through the data revolutionMassive new possibilities through user friendly and innovative tools to change poor people’s lives for everTuranesh has pension and health care and can be seen, heard and taken notice of Her children will have the same when they are old tooThe world will be  
  • Provides a practical model to improve national and international data sets on ageingPost 2015 process - practical contribution to the “data revolution” called for in the new development framework A global framework to measure progress on ‘leaving no one behind’ in the successor goals to the Millennium Development Goals Keeping watch: the first steps in establishing a full understanding of the lives of older people around the worldPresent globally comparative data in a way that will engage policymakers, media, public, academics, corporates on issues and impact of global ageing
  • All domains are equally weighted, website allows people to vary weighting on line.See Insight (p.14/15) for detailed explanations of indicators. Methodology report expands on reasons and statistical methodology.Draws on statistical and perception data (enabling social environment)
  • Data volunteers delved deeper into the Index data to create engaging data visualisations that enable visitors to compare countries, view country profiles and identify clusters, and create their own Index by changing the domain weightings. As well as data visualisations, the new website featured blogs providing expert comment and analysis, individual country report cards with a detailed breakdown of indicator data for each domain,
  • 31Mar14 - Understanding wellbeing in old age across the world: lessons from across the “developing/developed” country divide - ppt presentation

    1. 1. Understanding wellbeing in old age across the world Monday 31st March 2014 This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing
    2. 2. Baroness Sally Greengross Chief Executive ILC-UK This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing
    3. 3. Chris Roles Director Age International This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing
    4. 4. Jessica Watson Policy and Communications Manager ILC-UK This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing
    5. 5. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. What is the relationship between financial satisfaction and happiness among older people? An analysis using the World Values Survey 1981-2008 Jessica Watson, International Longevity Centre – UK @ilcuk
    6. 6. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. This research  Authored by David Hayes, PFRC  Part of the ‘Financial dimensions of wellbeing in older age’ project funded under SDAI http://www.bris.ac.uk/geography/research/pfrc/esrc/
    7. 7. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. World Values Survey  Global assessment of social, political and economic attitudes and changes  Containing around 65,000 over-50s  84 countries over 5 waves (1981-2008)  Data weighted to be nationally representative  Descriptives are wave 5; Multilevel is all 5 waves
    8. 8. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. World Values Survey Source: http://www.worldvaluessurvey.org/wvs/article s/folder_published/article_base_56
    9. 9. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. The analysis  How levels of financial satisfaction (FS) vary b/w countries in the latest wave of data (2005-2008)  Relationship b/w age and financial satisfaction  Self-reported happiness by country; and by age  Model individual and country predictors of FS and happiness using multilevel modelling on all five waves  Identify common predictors
    10. 10. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. This research Table 1: Satisfaction of all those aged 50+ with household’s financial situation, by country Rank Country Percentage satisfied (%) Rank Country Percentage satisfied (%) Rank Country Percentage satisfied (%) 1 Switzerland 87 19 Trinidad and Tobago 65 37 Ghana 45 2 Norway 85 20 Hong Kong 65 38 Iran 44 3 Sweden 84 21 United States 64 39 Chile 39 4 Finland 83 22 Taiwan 63 40 Egypt 38 5 Canada 83 23 Germany 62 41 Morocco 36 6 Netherlands 82 24 China 61 42 Poland 35 7 Great Britain 80 25 Uruguay 61 43 Romania 31 8 Malaysia 78 26 Andorra 60 44 Ethiopia 29 9 New Zealand 76 27 Jordan 60 45 Serbia 29 10 Italy 76 28 Turkey 59 46 India 28 11 Japan 73 29 Brazil 56 47 Burkina Faso 27 12 Mexico 72 30 Spain 54 48 Iraq 27 13 Australia 71 31 Slovenia 54 49 Ukraine 26 14 Thailand 70 32 South Korea 52 50 Russia 26 15 Vietnam 69 33 Guatemala 52 51 Rwanda 24 16 Argentina 68 34 Mali 47 52 Moldova 23 17 Indonesia 68 35 Peru 47 53 Bulgaria 16 18 France 65 36 Zambia 46 54 Georgia 12 Source: World Values Survey 2005-2008. Base is all individuals aged 50 and above. Percentages are rounded to the nearest integer. Note that Cyprus and South Africa are omitted from this table due to small bases (>100).
    11. 11. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Financial satisfaction by country  Swiss (87%); followed by Norway, Sweden and Finland (85, 84, and 83%).  FCCs dominate lower ranks - Georgia lowest (12%); 6 of 10 countries with lowest FS are FCCs  Africa - low FS (Rwanda, B. Faso, Egypt, Ethiopia)  80% of Older Brits satisfied; only 66% under 50s
    12. 12. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Satisfaction with household financial situation of those aged 50+ by age group Figure 1: Satisfaction of all those aged 50+ with their household’s financial situation, grouped by age Source: World Values Survey 2005-2008. Base is all individuals aged 50 and above. Percentages are rounded to the nearest integer. 53 56 57 54 54 59 60 48 50 52 54 56 58 60 62 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80+ Percentageinagegroupreportingbeing financiallysatisfied Age Group
    13. 13. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. This research Table 2: Self-reported happiness of all those aged 50+, grouped by country Rank Country Percentage happy(%) Rank Country Percentage happy(%) Rank Country Percentage happy(%) 1 New Zealand 97 19 Italy 87 37 Rwanda 76 2 Sweden 97 20 Jordan 87 38 Guatemala 75 3 Malaysia 96 21 South Korea 86 39 China 75 4 Norway 96 22 Poland 86 40 Ghana 75 5 Canada 95 23 France 86 41 Ethiopia 73 6 Indonesia 94 24 Mexico 85 42 Chile 72 7 United States 94 25 Argentina 85 43 Slovenia 71 8 Switzerland 93 26 Morocco 85 44 India 69 9 Netherlands 93 27 Turkey 85 45 Ukraine 65 10 Great Britain 93 28 Trinidad and Tobago 83 46 Zambia 61 11 Australia 92 29 Taiwan 82 47 Peru 61 12 Japan 91 30 Germany 82 48 Georgia 56 13 Brazil 91 31 Egypt 81 49 Russia 53 14 Thailand 91 32 Hong Kong 80 50 Serbia 50 15 Finland 90 33 Uruguay 80 51 Iraq 47 16 Vietnam 89 34 Burkina Faso 80 52 Bulgaria 46 17 Andorra 89 35 Mali 77 53 Romania 44 18 Spain 88 36 Iran 76 54 Moldova 33 Source: World Values Survey 2005-2008. Base is all individuals aged 50 and above. Percentages are rounded to the nearest integer. Note that Cyprus and South Africa are omitted from this table due to small bases (>100).
    14. 14. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Happiness by country  More than nine-in-ten Britons happy (93%)  New Zealand and Sweden ‘top’, 97% of people  Similarities between Table 1 and Table 2 striking  Of the 10 countries with highest FS, 8 also feature among the ten ‘happiest’.  7 countries are in the bottom 10 of both FS and happiness
    15. 15. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Self-reported happiness of those aged 50+ by age group Figure 2: Self-reported happiness of all those aged 50+, grouped by age Source: World Values Survey 2005-2008. Base is all individuals aged 50 and above. Percentages are rounded to the nearest integer. 80 79 80 77 77 77 76 74 75 76 77 78 79 80 81 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80+ Percentageinagegroupreportingbeing happy Age Group
    16. 16. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Multilevel modelling  Multilevel modelling used to analyse hierarchies  Which here is individuals nested within countries  Allows exploration of complex data structures  Simultaneous analysis of different levels of the dataset (i.e. at individual and country level)  The models we run are two-level binomial logit models, using McMC estimation
    17. 17. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Individual-level predictors of financial dissatisfaction among over 50s  50-54s 2* the odds of being dissatisfied (cf. 80+)  Divorced = odds of 1.7; single = 1.3 (cf. married)  Unemployed twice the odds of dissatisfaction  Education a ‘continuous relationship’ with FS  SR lower class 5* the odds of being dissatisfied  Saving behaviour a highly significant predictor
    18. 18. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Country-level predictors of financial dissatisfaction among over 50s  After controlling individual-level characteristics:  Lowest quartile of GDP 2.2*the odds (cf. highest)  African countries 1.9*the odds of reporting FDS.  Former Communist Countries 4*the odds of reporting financial dissatisfaction (cf. W.Europe)  Income inequality not a significant predictor
    19. 19. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Individual-level predictors of unhappiness among over 50s  Similarly to financial (dis)satisfaction, and when controlling for other characteristics, survey wave, employment status, marital status, education, social class and savings behaviour are significant predictors of happiness.  No. of children and gender now significant (men slightly more unhappy); age is not significant
    20. 20. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Country-level predictors of unhappiness among the over-50s  After controlling individual-level characteristics:  Lowest quartile of GDP 2.2*the odds (cf. highest)  Continuing similarities to model of FS, those in European FCCs higher odds (3.6) of being unhappy than those in the rest of Europe.  Income inequality (Gini) again not significant.
    21. 21. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Table 3: Significant variables in predicting both financial dissatisfaction and unhappiness Variable entered into multilevel model Significant predictor of financial dissatisfaction? Significant predictor of unhappiness? Significant predictor of both financial dissatisfaction and unhappiness? Wave  * * Gender X  X Age group  X X Marital Status    Employment Status    Number of children X  X Education    Self-reported social class    Savings behaviour    Gini Income Inequality X X X GDP per capita    Geography    *Borderline statistical significance
    22. 22. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Security and trust?  Financial satisfaction rooted in…?  Income in later life – Able and enabled to work – Filial piety – Established and reliable pension schemes?
    23. 23. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Security and trust? 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Pension index grade v Percentage over 50s financially satisfied Overall index grade Percentage satisfied Overall index grade from Melbourne Mercer Global Pension Grade 2013. http://globalpensionindex.com/2013/melbourne-mercer-global- pension-index-2013-report.pdf Satisfaction level from PFRC analysis of World values Survey 2005-2008
    24. 24. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Security and trust? 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Pension index grade v Percentage over 50s financially satisfied with line of best fit Overall index grade Percentage satisfied Linear (Percentage satisfied) Overall index grade from Melbourne Mercer Global Pension Grade 2013. http://globalpensionindex.com/2013/melbourne-mercer-global- pension-index-2013-report.pdf Satisfaction level from PFRC analysis of World values Survey 2005-2008
    25. 25. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Final thoughts  Some good news - 55% of over 50s report being satisfied with household financial situation  Macroeconomic context – African countries 1.9x more likely to report FS – FCC 4x more likely (cf. W Europe)  Self-categorisation – in socioeconomic class and for financial satisfaction
    26. 26. The International Longevity Centre-UK is an independent, non-partisan think-tank dedicated to addressing issues of longevity, ageing and population change. Many thanks Jessica Watson Policy and Communications Manager International Longevity Centre - UK jessicawatson@ilcuk.org.uk 02073400440 Twitter: @ILCUK Websites with all outputs: http://www.bristol.ac.uk/geography/research/pfrc/esrc/ www.ilcuk.org.uk
    27. 27. Jane Scobie Director of Communications and Advocacy Helpage International This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing
    28. 28. Jane Scobie Director of Advocacy and Communications www.globalagewatch.org
    29. 29. HelpAge International Our vision is a world in which older people fulfill their potential to lead dignified, active, healthy and secure lives. -
    30. 30. Global AgeWatch Index • First-ever measure of quality of life and well- being of older people around the world • Uses the latest data available from World Bank, WHO, ILO, and Gallup World View • Covers 91 countries representing 89% of the world‟s older people ©Randomwire/Flickr
    31. 31. Global AgeWatch Index - overall rankings
    32. 32. Story behind the Index, meet Katerina • No formal education • No pension • Works very hard • Ill but can‟t afford healthcare • Looks after young children • Invisible and excluded because of her age
    33. 33. Older people are missed out of data collection and analyses They are invisible to policy makers Who sees Katerina?
    34. 34. Proportion of population aged 60+ in 2012 and 2050
    35. 35. What will make a difference
    36. 36. Why an Index? • Start process • To provide a framework that countries can use to explore their response to ageing; goes beyond economics, reflects priorities of people in older age • To benchmarks countries and provide a tool for CSO to measure progress and hold governments to account. • To generate national and global debate, share experience • Make a practical contribution to the “data revolution” called for in the new Post 2015 development framework
    37. 37. What concept underlies the Index? • The Index captures multidimensional aspects of quality of life and well-being of older people; • The Index is built on human development principles which put people and their empowerment at the heart of all social and economic policies; • Indicators and their groupings into several domains reflect views of older people on issues most important to them (from HelpAge/UNFPA‟s „Ageing in the 21st Century‟, 2012).
    38. 38. Four domains and thirteen indicators
    39. 39. Global Rankings Insufficient data coverage for Africa, Middle East and Caribbean – close to 100 countries missing
    40. 40. Evidence generated by the Index • History counts - progressive social welfare policies for all their citizens across the life-course (Nordic European countries) • Money is not everything –„smart‟ age-focussed spending needed. Poor countries have lessons on offer. (Bolivia and Korea: Ensuring access to quality healthcare has been vital in achieving good health outcomes) • Ageing well requires action - social progress doesn‟t guarantee the wellbeing of all (examples of Korea and India) • It’s never too soon to invest in ageing (Sweden and Norway; also Mauritius, and southern Latin American countries invested early)
    41. 41. Regional results: Asia (selected countries)
    42. 42. How the Index is being used • 60,000 downloads, 3000 media hits 62 countries • National research on quality of life older people using micro level data of Kenya, Korea, Bangladesh, China, India UAE, Colombia, Bolivia, Peru and Pakistan • Latin America and ASEAN interest in creating sub-regional Index • Ministry of Health and Social Services of Quebec - Index for the province • CSO e.g. Korea, Bolivia, Colombia, India
    43. 43. Partnerships • World Bank: provision of data on poverty among older people • UN Women: work around data, advocacy and research on older women • Collaboration between Commonwealth Youth Forum Index and Global AgeWatch Index to ensure post-2015 Sustainable Development report responds to all ages • Human Development Report – how capabilities, choices and freedoms experienced in early life interconnect in later life, how to build resilience to vulnerability and peruse „sustained human progress‟ • Gallup World Survey – extending surveys
    44. 44. Next steps • Update and publish Index annually on 1 October, 2014 focus on income security • Evidenced based report and policy briefs based on the Index data • Expand number of countries, disaggregate by gender • Develop stakeholder engagement programme at national level, Index training, expand national report cards • Seek ways to improve index through analysis of micro data and building of feedback – Version 2.0 in 3-5 years time?
    45. 45. Next steps Please use it and help us create a better world for everyone
    46. 46. Thank you!
    47. 47. Tim Fassam Head of Public Affairs Prudential This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing
    48. 48. Please follow the below link for information on the Global Aging Preparedness Project http://gapindex.csis.org/ This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing
    49. 49. Panel Debate and Q&A This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing
    50. 50. Lunch This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing
    51. 51. Panel Debate Rodd Bond, Director, Netwell Centre This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing
    52. 52. Improving the Well-Being of Older People Considerations on a Capability Approach to ‘Ageing and Justice’. 31th March 2014 Understanding wellbeing in old age across the world: lessons from across the ‘developed/developing’ country divide Age International, PRFC, ILC-UK Debate Rodd Bond mriai Netwell Centre, Dundalk, Ireland
    53. 53. Settlement Global economy Demographic change Climate change Our Future Sustainability context Connection / belonging
    54. 54. Resource Reconfiguration Service quality Front-line Empower organisational edge (client) for greater self- management Equitable access Financial balance Based on Tony O’Brien slide (HSE) at Trinity Sumer School 2012 Shifting the edge Public Service Reform
    55. 55. Care & Cure Private services Family 1. Cross sectoral alignments 2. Pathway integration Person Public services Community/Voluntary empower and connect the citizen 3. Convergence over time Shifting the centre: the citizen Person at the heart
    56. 56. Learning Productive Leisure 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 10090 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 10090 Economics of longer living A changing lifecourse
    57. 57. Connection: Rural transport & urban mobility Confidence: Sense of safety & security Empowerment: Better access to better information Alignment & Convergence: Health, housing and care Shareable places for all: Recognise frailty Lifecourse: Inter-generational solidarity Energy for change: Older people as a resource Buildings and outdoor spaces Housing Transport Respect and inclusion Social participation Civic participation/employment Information and communication Community and health services WHO: Age-Friendly Cities An integrated agenda for change
    58. 58. Data sources – Gallop doesn’t do it ? Emerging measures / connectivity Digital inclusion ? Possibly conflicting directions – employment vs care – and choice ? Data resolution – neighbourhood level – issues hidden within cities? Measures and metrics A look at Ireland
    59. 59. Capability Approach ‘When evaluating well-being ( a flourishing life ) – the most important thing is to consider what people are actually able to be and do’. The Capability Approach focuses directly on the quality of life that individuals are actually able to achieve. This quality of life is analysed in terms of the core concepts of ‘functionings’ and ‘capability’. •Functionings are states of ‘being and doing’ – ie well nourished, having shelter, literate, … •Capability refers to a set of valuable functionings that a person has effective access to. Thus a person’s capability represents the effective freedom of an individual to choose between different functioning combinations – between different kinds of life – that he/she has reason to value. Amartya Sen Capability Set (functionings available to choose from) Personal ‘utilisation function’ (Depending on interpersonal differences; physiology, and physical and social environment) – ability to convert. Functionings achieved Resources (Characteristics of goods available) Utility (Subjective well- being)
    60. 60. We need a framework • Our problems evaluating the implementation of existing and innovative policies and practices (measures and indicators) ? • Our problems framing a coherent agenda across older persons’ employment, inclusion, welfare, health, access and justice/rights ? • What to do ? – To enhance our well-being – quality of life – Within resource constraints - effectively and sustainably – Attractively, accessibly, safely – quality of environment • How to govern / plan / collaborate / partner / co-design etc ….. (doing it together) ? • How to know were going in the right direction (information needs )?
    61. 61. Panel Debate Dr Jack Watters, Vice President of External Affairs, Pfizer Ken Bluestone, Policy Adviser, Age International This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing
    62. 62. Panel Debate and Q&A This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing
    63. 63. Understanding wellbeing in old age across the world Monday 31st March 2014 This event is kindly supported by Age International #worldwellbeing

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