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Economics of promoting personalresponsibility for improved public  health – saving costs or costing                       ...
WelcomeBaroness Sally Greengross                                      ILC-UK                             #responsiblehealt...
Active Ageing: Live Longer and                             Prosper                       Professor David TaylorProfessor o...
Active Ageing: Live Longer and ProsperPresentation for The Actuarial ProfessionStaple Inn Hall, High Holborn, April 25th 2...
This presentation addresses• Population ageing as a desirable form of social  and economic development, central to  demogr...
Impairment                      Primary              Comorbidities                               prevention              D...
From WHO’s 2012 World Health Day global brief
Years of life lost per 100,000 population aged 60+, by condition (WHO 2012)
Years lost to disability by cause per 100,000 population over 60 (WHO 2012)
Key issues• As life expectancies      • What policies and  increase, what              strategies are most  happens to hea...
Some answers?• There is robust  evidence that, as life  • The traditional use of                            measures such ...
Pro-active policy options                                  •   Not waiting for minor problems to                          ...
The NHS has often relied on scandal to drive improvement, and there is acase for believing this to be desirable in an open...
Pharmaceuticals in the 21st century•   We have already changed the    links between conditions such    as T2 diabetes and ...
Actuarial risks and uncertainties (?)• Calculating future LEs and HLEs, and understanding  the determinants of working lif...
Conclusions• Continuing population ageing will challenge all  communities in the next century. But it will not in  itself ...
David.Taylor@Pharmacy.ac.ukDr Jennifer Gill and I are grateful to Alliance Boots for thecompany’s financial and other supp...
Panel Debate and Q&A                      Tricia Kennerley   Group Healthcare Public Affairs Director                     ...
Panel Debate and Q&A• What are and should be the philosophical and political underpinnings of public  health policy?• Are ...
Economics of promoting personalresponsibility for improved public   health – saving costs or costing                      ...
ILC-UK and the Actuarial Profession Debate: The Economics of Promoting Personal Responsibility for Improved Public Health ...
ILC-UK and the Actuarial Profession Debate: The Economics of Promoting Personal Responsibility for Improved Public Health ...
ILC-UK and the Actuarial Profession Debate: The Economics of Promoting Personal Responsibility for Improved Public Health ...
ILC-UK and the Actuarial Profession Debate: The Economics of Promoting Personal Responsibility for Improved Public Health ...
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ILC-UK and the Actuarial Profession Debate: The Economics of Promoting Personal Responsibility for Improved Public Health – Saving Costs or Costing Society? Supported by Alliance Boots

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ILC-UK is delighted to be working with Alliance Boots and the University College London School of Pharmacy to explore why public health has just got ‘personal’ and if such a trend will yield cost savings or cost some groups of society or sections of the economy more than others.

The event will also mark the launch of a report produced by Professor David Taylor and Dr Jennifer Gill from the UCL School of Pharmacy, supported by Alliance Boots entitled ‘Active Ageing: Live longer and prosper? Towards realising a second demographic dividend in 21st century Europe’.

The debate will focus on the balance between encouraging individual accountability and accepting collective responsibility for achieving longer lives and the consequent implications for health outcomes and cost.

The Coalition Government (like its predecessors) is trying to move away from the ‘nanny state’ towards ‘nudging’ people in the direction of choosing healthier behaviours.

Few people would question the desirability of encouraging more informed personal decision making to prevent avoidable illness. But too much reliance on individual choice and responsibility could fail those most at risk and potentially impose needless costs and losses on individuals, their families and the wider community. Promoting the behavioural and cultural changes needed to deliver better public health and keep NHS and social care costs as affordable as possible remains a pressing and complex challenge.

Subject areas to discuss will include:

The philosophical and political underpinnings of public health policy, including: social solidarity, fairness, entitlement, risk and personal responsibility. Are we in danger of unravelling the principle tenets of the Beveridge model welfare state in ways which may not only disadvantage the most vulnerable, but may in time increase financial pressures on other sectors of society?

Determining the boundaries of personal and societal level responsibility, and the legitimate as opposed to illegitimate need for publicly funded care and support. In areas ranging from smoking cessation to reducing the threat of an obesity driven diabetes epidemic, communities have to make tough choices between limiting risks and accepting the consequences of personal, social and corporate freedom.

The impact of current trends and possible future policy decisions in areas ranging from the costs of health and life insurance to the price of pensions for individuals and society.

The role of private employers in promoting and requiring healthy living.

The winners and losers if the trend towards personal responsibility continues, with particular regard to older people and disadvantaged groups and what impact could this trend have on the cost of care?

Agenda from the event
16:00
Registration
16:30
Welcome, Baroness Sally Greengross
16:40 – 18:25
Presentations and responses from:
Prof. David Taylor
Prof. Nick Bosaonquet
Tricia Kennerley
Martin Green

Published in: Health & Medicine, Business
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ILC-UK and the Actuarial Profession Debate: The Economics of Promoting Personal Responsibility for Improved Public Health – Saving Costs or Costing Society? Supported by Alliance Boots

  1. 1. Economics of promoting personalresponsibility for improved public health – saving costs or costing society? 25 April 2012 #responsiblehealth This event is kindly supported by Alliance Boots
  2. 2. WelcomeBaroness Sally Greengross ILC-UK #responsiblehealthThis event is kindly supported by Alliance Boots
  3. 3. Active Ageing: Live Longer and Prosper Professor David TaylorProfessor of Pharmaceuticals and Public Health Policy School of Pharmacy, UCL #responsiblehealth This event is kindly supported by Alliance Boots
  4. 4. Active Ageing: Live Longer and ProsperPresentation for The Actuarial ProfessionStaple Inn Hall, High Holborn, April 25th 2012David TaylorProfessor of Pharmaceutical and Public Health PolicyThe UCL School of Pharmacy
  5. 5. This presentation addresses• Population ageing as a desirable form of social and economic development, central to demographic, epidemiological and care transition• Recent trends in life expectancy and healthy life expectancy• Key policy issues, including those relating to the current and future role of (community) pharmacy and pharmaceuticals in the contexts of primary, secondary and tertiary prevention• Challenges and opportunities relevant to the Actuarial Profession and its future
  6. 6. Impairment Primary Comorbidities prevention Disability and Secondary Disability dependence prevention TertiaryHandicap Frailty prevention
  7. 7. From WHO’s 2012 World Health Day global brief
  8. 8. Years of life lost per 100,000 population aged 60+, by condition (WHO 2012)
  9. 9. Years lost to disability by cause per 100,000 population over 60 (WHO 2012)
  10. 10. Key issues• As life expectancies • What policies and increase, what strategies are most happens to health likely to contribute to expectancies? increased healthy life• Is population ageing expectancy without inevitably associated undermining public with a relative loss of interests in sustainable economic competivity? economic development?
  11. 11. Some answers?• There is robust evidence that, as life • The traditional use of measures such as EDRs expectancies increase, is unhelpful and age specific disability misleading. Given the right rates decline macro-economic and• There is limited social policy environment, evidence of improved health in later life could lead to ‘disability/morbidity productivity gains which compression’, even outweigh the costs of without focused population ageing policies in place
  12. 12. Pro-active policy options • Not waiting for minor problems to develop into major ones • Cascading where possible preventive and ‘maintenance’ care ‘down’ from medical environments into lower cost settings – actively seeking new paradigms • Investing in new technologies likely to protect health and prevent disability throughout unnaturally long lives • Providing good quality social care for everyone living with Bevan, Dilnot, a Matron and a disabilities with ways which wholesome patient reward independence and self reliance and do not foster ‘learnt helplessness’
  13. 13. The NHS has often relied on scandal to drive improvement, and there is acase for believing this to be desirable in an open societyPerhaps the true scandal today is that while we are preoccupied with atbest questionable claims about the efficiency savings the NHS will have tomake in the next few years and improbable projections of the costs ofdiabetes and dementia in future decades, what may in reality be being cutis already low spending on long term social care for the minority of olderpeople who have lost their independent living abilities
  14. 14. Pharmaceuticals in the 21st century• We have already changed the links between conditions such as T2 diabetes and mortality. But 20th century drug innovations will be used to significantly better effect in the 21st century• 21st century pharmaceutical innovations will foster not only ‘personalised medicine’, but better mass protection against conditions currently prevalent in Female life expectancy, England 1975-2005 later life. This may impact on HLE more than overall LE
  15. 15. Actuarial risks and uncertainties (?)• Calculating future LEs and HLEs, and understanding the determinants of working life expectancy• Evaluating the risks associated with disability and long term care insurance provision, and contributing to the design of sustainable products and policies• Factoring in the effects of ongoing bio-pharmaceutical innovation on health and the human ageing process, nationally and globally
  16. 16. Conclusions• Continuing population ageing will challenge all communities in the next century. But it will not in itself present unaffordable barriers to the future provision of good quality health and social care, or increased general prosperity• We need to leave behind ambiguous, needlessly negative, attitudes towards both population ageing and the use of medicines in modern societies• Pharmacists and all other established health sector stakeholders could help introduce appropriate ways of serving older communities more (cost) effectively than is currently possible
  17. 17. David.Taylor@Pharmacy.ac.ukDr Jennifer Gill and I are grateful to Alliance Boots for thecompany’s financial and other support for our work, and toILC-UK colleagues for their contributions to its dissemination
  18. 18. Panel Debate and Q&A Tricia Kennerley Group Healthcare Public Affairs Director Alliance Boots Martin Green Chief Executive English Community Care Association #responsiblehealthThis event is kindly supported by Alliance Boots
  19. 19. Panel Debate and Q&A• What are and should be the philosophical and political underpinnings of public health policy?• Are we in danger of unravelling the principle tenets of the Beveridge model welfare state in ways which may not only disadvantage the most vulnerable, but may in time increase financial pressures on other sectors of society?• How do we determine the boundaries of personal and societal level responsibility, and the legitimate as opposed to illegitimate need for publicly funded care and support?• What is the role of the wider health community such as pharmacies and employers in promoting the healthy living agenda?• How can we ensure the white paper on social care responds to the challenge of greater life expectancy and delivers a social care system which provides high quality care and support for all?• How can we ensure a life course approach to active ageing and living longer?
  20. 20. Economics of promoting personalresponsibility for improved public health – saving costs or costing society? 25 April 2012 #responsiblehealth This event is kindly supported by Alliance Boots

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