Collaboration business models - rapport

6,610 views

Published on

Collaboration and Business Models
in the Creative Industry. Exploring heterogeneous collaborations.

Published in: Design
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
6,610
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
31
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
267
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Collaboration business models - rapport

  1. 1. Collaboration and Business Models   in the Creative Industry  Exploring heterogeneous collaborations                                Commissioner:  IIPCreate  Authors:     Remco Kossen         Peter van de Poel         Isabelle Reymen  Date:      March 2010 
  2. 2. Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 2 of 47 
  3. 3. PREFACE  This  report  is  the  result  of  the  IIP  Create  project  "Collaboration  and  business  models  in  the  creative  industry".  Collaboration  and  business  models  are  one  of  the  key  themes  of  the  Strategic  Research  Agenda of IIP Create. IIPCreate is one of the Innovation platforms of ICT Regie, stressing the importance  of  the  creative  sector.  The  report  describes  a)  important  and  relevant  literature,  b)  important  stakeholders, and c) best practices and problems on collaboration and business models in the creative  industry.  The  aim  of  this  report  is  to  inform  and  convince  policy  makers,  knowledge  institutes  and  practice  of  the  importance  of  the  topic  and  indicate  areas  for  further  research  in  the  near  future.  It  should provide the basis information for a proposal and consortium on the topic.  Based  on a request from  IIP Create, Isabelle Reymen from  Eindhoven  University of  Technology  (TU/e)  and  Catholijn  Jonker  from  TUDelft  wrote  a  project  proposal  in  Spring  2009,  which  was  accorded  by  IIPCreate  in  August  2009.  It  was  one  of  the  Ways  of  Working  (WoW)  Projects,  coordinated  by  Anne  Nigten.  The  project  was  performed  from  September  2009  till  March  2010  by  two  master  students  of  TU/e, Remco Kossen and Peter van de Poel, under supervision of Isabelle Reymen.  dr.ir.arch. Isabelle is Assistant Professor Design Processes at the Eindhoven University of  Technology (TU/e) and working in the Innovation, Technology Entrepreneurship, and Marketing  Group (ITEM) of the Department of Industrial Engineering and Innovation Sciences. The  research conducted in the ITEM group relates to the areas of New Product Development, and  Entrepreneurship and Commercialization of New Technology. Education is mainly provided in  the programs "Innovation Management" (Master) and "Technische Bedrijfskunde" (Bachelor).  Entrepreneurship related education activities take place in the Brabant Center of  Entrepreneurship, a collaboration between the University of Tilburg and the TU/e.   B.Sc. Peter van de Poel finished his Bachelor Industrial Engineering and is enrolled in the  Operations Management and Logistic master at TU/e. He plans to graduate this summer.  B.Eng. Remco Kossen finished his bachelor Mechanical Engineering and is enrolled in the  Innovation Management master. He plans to graduate this summer.  We especially like to thank people who made this study possible. First of all, we like to thank Catholijn  Jonker for her support in writing the proposal. Also very important was Anne Nigten for representing the  WoW projects on a higher level in IIPcreate. We like to thank Geleijn Meijer (director of IIP Create) and  Patricia Heukensfeldt Jansen and Frits Grotenhuis working for IIPCreate for their support of our project,  also financially, and for arranging all contract‐related aspects. Content related expertise in the field of  collaboration  and  business  models  was  obtained  from  the  TU/e  Department  of  Industrial  Engineering  and Innovation Sciences, group of Innovation, Technology entrepreneurship and Marketing (www.item‐ eindhoven.nl). Especially Hans Berends and Ksenia Podoynitsyna provided constructive feedback during  the project.     Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 3 of 47 
  4. 4. TABLE OF CONTENTS    Preface..................................................................................................................................................... 3  Summary.................................................................................................................................................. 5  1  Introduction ..................................................................................................................................... 7  2  Research Approach .......................................................................................................................... 8  2.1  Overall Approach .................................................................................................................... 8   2.2  Identification of Important Stakeholders ................................................................................ 8   2.3  Identification of Best practices and Problems ......................................................................... 8   2.3.1  Data Collection ................................................................................................................... 8   2.3.2  Case Selection..................................................................................................................... 8   2.3.3  Data Analysis ...................................................................................................................... 9   2.4  Literature Review.................................................................................................................... 9   3  Literature Review ........................................................................................................................... 10  3.1  Introduction.......................................................................................................................... 10  3.2  The Creative Industry............................................................................................................ 10   3.3  Collaboration ........................................................................................................................ 12  3.4  Business Models ................................................................................................................... 13   3.4.1  What is a business Model? ............................................................................................... 13   3.4.2  Frameworks of Business Models....................................................................................... 13   3.4.3  Type of Business Models .................................................................................................. 16   3.5  Collaboration and Business Models ...................................................................................... 17   3.5.1  Open Business Models: ‘Inside‐out’ and ‘Outside‐in’........................................................ 17  3.5.2  Co‐development partnerships .......................................................................................... 19   3.6  Conclusion ............................................................................................................................ 19  4  Important Stakeholders.................................................................................................................. 20  4.1  Stakeholders Interviewed ..................................................................................................... 20   4.2  Other Stakeholders in the Creative Industry ......................................................................... 22   4.3  Conclusion ............................................................................................................................ 23  5  Best Practices and Problems .......................................................................................................... 24   5.1  Collaboration in the Creative Industry .................................................................................. 24   5.1.1  The importance of having a network ................................................................................ 24   5.1.2  Formalization and contracts & IP ...................................................................................... 24   5.1.3  Communication & trust .................................................................................................... 26   5.1.4  Heterogeneity in Size and Discipline ................................................................................. 26   5.2  Business models in the Creative Industry.............................................................................. 28   5.3  Collaborative Business Models.............................................................................................. 30   5.4  Conclusion ............................................................................................................................ 32  6  Conclusions .................................................................................................................................... 33  7  References ..................................................................................................................................... 35  8  Interview notes .............................................................................................................................. 36  9  Appendices..................................................................................................................................... 37  9.1  Interview Protocol entrepreneur .......................................................................................... 37   9.2  Interview Protocol – information brokers ............................................................................. 39   9.3  Business Models ................................................................................................................... 41     Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 4 of 47 
  5. 5. SUMMARY  This  report  is  the  result  of  the  IIP  Create  project  "Collaboration  and  business  models  in  the  creative  industry".  Collaboration  and  business  models  are  one  of  the  key  themes  of  the  Strategic  Research  Agenda  of  IIP  Create.  The  report  describes  a)  important  and  relevant  literature,  b)  important  stakeholders, and c) best practices and problems on collaboration and business models in the creative  industry.  The  aim  of  this  report  is  to  inform  and  convince  policy  makers,  knowledge  institutes  and  practice  of  the  importance  of  the  topic  and  indicate  areas  for  further  research  in  the  near  future.  It  should provide the basis information for a proposal and consortium on the topic.  Collaboration  in  the  creative  industry  is  indeed  very  important.  There  are  several  reasons  for  collaborations  between partners in the creative industry. For example, creative businesses (ZZP, start‐ ups,  SME,)  often  lack  resources  to  leverage  their  creativity  into  successful  products  whereas  other  (larger)  companies  often  lack  creativity  and  speed  to  exploit  their  IP.  Based  on  our  study,  we  see  heterogeneous  collaborations  in  the  creative  industry  as  collaborations  a)  between  different  type  of  partners: e.g. ZZP, SME, start‐ups versus e.g. large corporations, knowledge institutes, cultural institutes,  b)  between  partners  from  different  disciplines  (different  Beta  disciplines  like  mechanical  engineering,  electrical  engineering  etc.,  but  also  alfa  and  gamma  disciplines),  and  c)  with  different  positions  in  the  value chain/on different topics, e.g. concept development, marketing and customer involvement, supply  chain, etc..  Important problems recognized in collaborations in the creative industry are a) economic valuation of  creative/cultural  value  is  difficult  since  this  value  is  to  a  great  extent  intangible,  which  often  rises  problems with the protection of IP or in the attraction of money; b) differences in culture and approach  between  partners  (e.g.  formality,  hierarchy,  scale).  Since  the  creative  industry  employs  approximately  30% of the Dutch employees, the collaboration problems are not incidental but structural; most of the  interviewees state that it is difficult.   Important  enablers  for  collaborations  in  the  creative  industry  seem  to  be  subsidies  (like  Point  One),  development environments (like Fablab), networks (like social networks), and communication and trust  (versus  formalization,  contracts  and  IP).  Practitioners  invented  numerous  ways  (best  practices)  to  overcome  typical  problems  with  heterogeneous  collaboration.  Many  entrepreneurs  are  involved  in  (large) networks and use strong‐ and weak ties relationships. These relationships enable them to attract  money and raise funds, get (free) juridical advice, and/or start new cooperation’s. Many of them state  that communication and trust are essential in maintaining these networks. Furthermore, entrepreneurs  show a great amount of creativity in creating business models. Some offer a diversified product/service  portfolio to extent the number of possible income channels. Others are involved in numerous subsidy  programs. Some even create unique distribution channels.  Two dominant type of business models could be identified in the creative industry, namely creators, in  which products are created and sold to buyers (physical as well as intangible assets are being sold) and  brokers, facilitating sales by matching potential buyers and sellers, of mainly intangible assets (based on  the  framework  of  Malone,  2006).  Some  other  business  model  related  aspects  we  found  are:  every  model  is  unique;  alignment  of  the  partners'  business  models  is  essential  in  fruitful  collaboration;  and  open  innovation  (inside‐out  and  outside‐in)  stimulates  collaborations  and  enables  new  ways  of  doing  business. Despite the large amount of professional attention to business models, academic literature on  business  models  is  scarce.  We  could  identify  several  frameworks  of  business  models  and  types  of  business  models.  But  insight  on  the  design  and  development  of  business  models  for  (heterogeneous)  collaboration  is  limited,  let  alone  specific  to  the  creative  industry.  Empirical  research  based  on  some  good (and bad) practices may help to create insight in the development of effective business models  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 5 of 47 
  6. 6. and create guidelines to design business models useful in the creative industry. So although some best  practice  exist,  more  research  towards  effective  business  models  for  collaboration  in  the  creative  industry is needed. It should enhance both scientists and practitioners to fully exploit the opportunities  in the creative industry.   Also  guidelines  and  support  is  needed  to  face  the  many  challenges  when  setting  up  heterogeneous  collaborations. This has not been covered widely in the literature, and also in practice, little is known.  Many  of  the  interviewees  acknowledged  that  most  collaborations  are  designed  by  their  gut  feelings.  Insight  in  the  development  and  guidelines  for  the  design  of  business  models  for  different  type  of  (heterogeneous) collaborations is definitely missing. In order to create useful guidelines, many different  streams  in  the  literature  need  to  be  synthesized,  like  literature  on  partnerships,  inter‐organizational  collaboration  and  open  innovation,  and  applied  to  the  creative  industry.  For  research  purposes,  selecting a specific area in the creative industry is thereby needed, e.g. the music industry.   Some specific questions for further research on business models for heterogeneous collaborations are  How to create and appropriate value   ‐ with business models that combine different types of value, not only economic value, but also  immaterial value (like cultural value, social value, knowledge value, idealistic (e.g.  sustainability) value)?   ‐ with a business model that is both innovative and still accepted in the industry? (What  determines a business model success, to be accepted?)   ‐ with (not‐used) IP of larger organizations (Philips Research, TNO,etc.), based on collaboration  between larger organizations and SME/creative ZZP in a win‐win situation? (idea of big player,  make business with small player) (valorisation)  ‐ based on collaboration between creative ZZP/SME and larger organizations in a win‐win  situation? (idea of small player, scale up with large player)  ‐ in interface between big players and users/ZZP/SME? (e.g. platform development between  professional content providers and users)?     How to support value creation and appropriation   ‐ in inter‐organizational business models? (Business models that do not belong to one  organization, but to the value chain; next to the business models of partner organizations.)    Eindhoven University of Technology is interested in studying these questions in the creative industry and  welcomes  collaborations  with  enthusiastic  partners.  We  would  like  to  combine  knowledge  creation  according  to  academic  standards,  with  developing  guidelines  that  can  be  used  for  improving  value  creation and appropriation in the creative industry.  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 6 of 47 
  7. 7. 1 INTRODUCTION  The  creative  industry  is  an  important  (Dutch)  industry.  Approximately  30%  of  the  Dutch  workforce  is  employed in this area (SRA, 2009). The rise of this new sector over the last years has led to a significant  amount  of  opportunities  for  the  economy  and  its  entrepreneurs.  However,  the  different  nature  and  innovativeness of this industry gave rise to a number of new and difficult challenges (SRA, 2009). As a  result  of  these  challenges,  there  is  a  demand  for  support  in  creating  (new)  business  models  and  for  guidelines for collaboration between the involved parties.   Specific  for  the  creative  industry  are  heterogeneous  collaborations.  The  creative  industry  is  characterized  by  many  Small  &  Medium  sized  enterprises  (SME’s)  and  Freelancers  or  "Zelfstandige  Zonder Personeel" (ZZP)1. They lack resources to leverage their creativity to bring successful products to  the  (global)  market.  Bigger  companies  and  multinationals  do  have  the  possibilities  to  bring  creative  products to the market, however often lack creativity and entrepreneurial spirit. Collaboration between  these  heterogeneous  parties  could  therefore  create  interesting  opportunities  for  both  parties.  Other  heterogeneous  collaborations  can  be  established  with  cultural  institutions,  knowledge  institutes  etc.  Supporting the organization of these  processes of collaboration between heterogeneous  partners and  the  creation  and  appropriation  of  value  for  all  stakeholders  in  these  collaborations  is  of  crucial  importance for the sector. Up till now it is however unclear how to do so effectively and efficiently.   The aim of this study is to identify relevant stakeholders, literature, and best practices and problems on  collaboration  and  business  models  in  the  creative  sector.  The  scope  of  the  study  is  defined  as:  “Collaboration  and  business  models  between  heterogeneous  partners  within  the  creative  industry”2.  The  creative  industry  is  well‐delineated  to  ICT  related  creative  industry.  Only  the  Dutch  situation  is  looked at. The study should be seen as a first step in creating insight and support for business models  and collaborations in the creative industry.   First,  academic  literature  regarding  business  models  and  collaboration  is  reviewed  and  analyzed,  and  described in Chapter 3 of this report. Secondly, important stakeholders regarding business models and  collaboration in the Dutch creative industry have been listed in Chapter 4; their background range from  entrepreneur  of  a  new  venture,  to  consultant  on  business  models  and  subsidy  coordinator  within  a  multi‐national.  Finally,  best  practices  and  problems  regarding  (heterogeneous)  collaborations  and  business models in the creative industry have been analyzed and are reported in Chapter 5, based on  interviews  with  creative  SME’s  and  Freelancers,  cultural  institutions,  multinationals,  consultancy,  and  researchers. The report starts in the next chapter with a discussion of the research approach and ends  with a conclusion summarizing the main findings and discussion of the directions for future research.                                                                    1  ZZP is a typical Dutch term for an entrepreneur without having personnel. It is often one person who  offers products or services and therefore sends a bill to his customers. (www.wikipedia.nl) 2  Samenwerking en business modellen tussen heterogene partners in de creatieve industrie  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 7 of 47 
  8. 8. 2 RESEARCH APPROACH  2.1 OVERALL APPROACH  The  main  goal  of  this  study  is  to  identify  relevant  stakeholders,  literature,  and  best  practices  and  problems  on  collaboration  and  business  models  in  the  creative  sector.  For  each  sub  goal,  the  methodology  to  obtain  it  is  described.  In  general,  the  research  follows  a  design  science  approach  (Romme and Endenburg, 2006), aiming to link research with practice and being focused on contributing  simultaneously to both scientific knowledge as knowledge useful in practice.   2.2 IDENTIFICATION OF IMPORTANT STAKEHOLDERS  At  the  start  of  the  project,  several  names  and  links  were  provided  by  IIP  Create  and  Anne  Nigten,  coordinator  of  the  Ways  of  Working  projects,  as  a  starting  point  to  look  for  important  stakeholders.  These  were  extended  by  desk  research  and  the  "snowball principle",  by  asking interviewees  for  other  interesting  or  important  stakeholders.  It  was  looked  at  stakeholders  in  knowledge  institutes,  consultancy, larger companies, SME and cultural institutions. There are two important limitations to this  method:  (1)  actors  who  are  not  connected  by  any  of  our  sample  will  not  be  located;  and  (2)  it  highly  depends on the pre‐defined list to catch all major players, without isolating sub‐set of actors within the  creative  ICT  industry.  In  total  30  have  been  identified.  This  list  is  far  from  complete,  but  is  at  least  representative of the diversity in the sector. The list should be extended in a dynamic way in the future,  to capture recent developments.   2.3 IDENTIFICATION OF BEST PRACTICES AND PROBLEMS  2.3.1 DATA COLLECTION  To identify best practices and problems on collaboration and business models in the creative industry,  an explorative qualitative research approach was followed, best suiting the limited knowledge available  yet. Interviews  were  the main  source  of  data. Furthermore,  publicly  available  information  on  internet  was used.   For the interviews, a focused (i.e. semi‐structured) interview protocol was used to collect data regarding  the difficulties and best‐practices of collaboration between heterogeneous partners and their business  models.  A  different  set  of  questions  was  used  for  interviewing  entrepreneurs  (interview  protocol  in  Section  8.1,  in  Dutch)  and  for  knowledge  brokers  (in  Section  8.2).  The  former  focuses  on  the  practice  and problems the entrepreneurs (start‐ups, SME's, larger corporations) experience; and asks for other  examples and important stakeholders in the sector. The latter focuses on the problems, challenges and  trends  seen  by  knowledge  institutes  regarding  collaboration  and  business  models  in  the  creative  industry,  their  knowledge  of  good  and  bad  practices  and  also  on  links  to  other  stakeholders  and  important  knowledge.  In  some  interviews  with  entrepreneurs,  some  questions  about  their  business  model  were  added.  As  a  frame  of  reference,  the  Business  Model  Canvas  from  Osterwalder  &  Pigneur  (2009) was used; it is discussed in more detail in the literature chapter.  2.3.2 CASE SELECTION  Based  on  the  identification  of  important  stakeholders  (see  Section  2.2),  a  subset.  was  made  for  interviewing. In total 16 interviews were held. Each interview still brought new insights; saturation was  thus  not  yet  reached,  but  resource  limitations  forced  to  stop  here.  Table  1  classifies  the  interviewees  into the following categories: size of organization (in number of employees or Small/ Medium / Large /  Extra Large), Function of interviewee, expertise of interviewee, artifacts produced by the organization  and the extent to which a company is subsidized. The expertise of the interviewee has three categories:  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 8 of 47 
  9. 9. Entrepreneurial expertise (expertise of the interviewee in starting and running new businesses), Creative  expertise  (involvement  and  knowledge  of  the  interviewee  in  the  creative  industry)  and  Business  Model/Collaboration expertise (expertise of the interviewee when it comes to the creation of business  models in a collaborative setting). The artifacts produced by the organization are knowledge, services, or  physical products.   Name  Size  Function  Expertise of  Artifacts produced by  Subsidized  Interviewee  Interviewee  organization        E.  C  BM /  Knowledge  Services  Products    Col  The Experience  S  Co‐founder  /  0  +  +  60%  40%  0%  0  Economy  Director  Yvonne Kirkels,  L  Ph. D.  ‐  ‐  +  100%  0%  0%  +  researcher  Serious Toys  3  Co‐founder  /  0  0  +  0%  0%  100%  ‐  Director  Waleli  4  Founder  /  +  +  +  0%  60%  40%  ‐  Director  CCF  1  Director  ‐  +  +  0%  50%  50%  +  Verkeersgame  2  Co‐founder  0  ‐  0  0%  0%  100%  0  NYOYN  6  Founder  +  0  +  0%  0%  100%  ‐  De Waag Society  57  Manager  ‐  +  +  %  %  %  +  Mediagilde  2+  Director  0  +  +  0%  100%  0%  +  Cap Gemini  L  Consultant  ‐  ‐  +  0%  100%  0%  ‐  Point One  M  Manager  ‐  ‐  +  0%  100%  0%  +  Prof. Grefen,  L  Professor  ‐  ‐  +  100%  0%  0%  +  researcher   Alice in Eindhoven  1  Director  ‐  +  0  0%  100%  0%  +  TNO  XXL  Consultant  ‐  +  +  33%  33%  33%  0  Patchingzone  M  Founder /  +  +  0  30%  70%  0%  +  Director  TABLE 1: OVERVIEW AND CLASSIFICATION OF INTERVIEWEES  2.3.3 DATA ANALYSIS  The data of the interviews was combined and structured and inductively coded into main themes (e.g.  use of network, importance of IP, communication, trust, business model). Afterwards the results were  compared to the literature.   2.4 LITERATURE REVIEW  Scientific  literature  was  searched  for  the  topics  (heterogeneous)  collaboration  and  business  models.  Most  important  and  most  relevant  papers  were  cited.  This  overview  is  in  no  sense  complete,  but  is,  according to us, a relevant representation of important literature. Mostly, general literature was found,  not specific for the creative industry. For information on the creative industry, mainly (SRA, 2009) was  used.  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 9 of 47 
  10. 10.   3 LITERATURE REVIEW  3.1 INTRODUCTION   This  chapter  shows  the  results  of  a  literature  review  which  aims  to  describe  the  specific  factors  and  elements  that  relate  to  (heterogeneous)  collaborations  and  business  models  in  the  creative  industry.  Although this review does not pretend to be exhaustive, it aims to cover as many relevant aspects as  possible. Note that the goal has been to include as many relevant aspects as possible, not to describe all  characteristics in the utmost detail.   The  reviews  start  with  the  definition  and  characterization  of  the  creative  industry  (Section  3.1).  The  subsequent section provides a brief overview of specific elements that relate to collaboration (section  3.2). Section 3.3 is solely devoted to the definition and use of business models; special attention is given  to the business model of Osterwalder and Pigneur (Osterwalder and Pigneur, 2009). Section 3.4 focuses  on the interrelation between collaboration and business models. The final section (Section 3.5) provides  a conclusion.  3.2 THE CREATIVE INDUSTRY   The creative industry is an important (Dutch) rising industry. This rise is mainly caused by the increased  production  flexibility  (largely  due  to  the  increased  IT  technologies)  and  the  growing  reflexivity  in  consumption  (SRA,  2009).  This  reflexivity  in  consumption  implies  that  customers  buy  products  that  engage  their  personal  identity.  Apple  users,  G‐Star  wearers,  or  2nd  hand  shop  customers  all  identify  themselves with the image and status of the brand. Or, to put it differently: “(the) creative life‐styles (of  customers) will affect private and community life, work styles and citizenship” (SRA, 2009, p. 10). As a  result,  creativity  is  an  important  input  into  all  sectors  where  “design  and  content  form  the  basis  of  competitive advantage in global economics markets” (Flew, 2002).    The  Creative  Industries  Task  Force  Mapping  Document  was  one  of  the  first  documents  that  distinguished and defined the creative industry (Smith, 2001). It defined creative industries as “activities  which have their origin in individual creativity, skill and talent and which have the potential for wealth  and job creation through generation and exploitation of intellectual property”. Besides this often cited  definition (see e.g. (Cunningham, 2002, Flew, 2002) the creative industry is also defined as follows “(the  creative industry) contains all who are creating in relative autonomy, operate in a social network, live a  local ecosystem and deliver their goods where they can on the world” (IIPCreate, 2010). This ‘all’ in the  preceding definition is often referred to as the ‘creating’ class. This class is characterized by members  that behave similar and who can be seen as autonomous. “They optimize experience and expectation,  and  strive  towards  total  acceptance  of  invisible  technology  in  ambient  intelligent  environments”  (IIPCreate, 2010; SRA, 2009, p.10).   The  creative  industry  is  defined  by  the  ICTInnovatie  Platform  as  including  gaming,  social  software,  Artificial  intelligence,  disclosure  cultural  and  personal  heritage,  new  media,  wearables  and  ambient  technology. This study uses an adapted version of this definition.  In  this  study,  the  creative  industry  is  defined  as  including  gaming,  disclosure  cultural  and  personal  heritage, new media, wearables and ambient technology. In this study, specific attention is paid to ICT  related companies.  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 10 of 47 
  11. 11.       Important Challenges in the Creative Sector                FIGURE 1: IMPORTANT CHALLENGES IN THE CREATIVE SECTOR The creative industry differs from the so called cultural industry. Cunningham mention that it differs at  least on two factors (Cunningham, 2002, p. 7). First, “content creation will become more important than  it  is  in  the  current  content  industries.    Distribution,  not  production,  is  where  most  profit‐making  currently  occurs”.    Second,  “the  creative  industries  will  be  characterized  increasingly  by  their  being  inputs  into  other  (service,  but  also  manufacturing  and  even  primary)  industries”.  As  a  result  of  these  (and more) differences, the industry faces several challenges of which some are introduced below.  Gap between idea generation and production. The first challenges the creative industry is facing, is  related to the existence of a gap between idea generation and production. Despite the numerous ideas  generated, the economic exploitation is often limited (SRA, 2009, p. 6). This is mainly caused by the fact  that engineers and designers ‘cannot find each other’ and due the existence of broken links in the  knowledge chain (SRA, 2009, p. 22).    Lack of creativity versus lack of resources. Small companies often lack resources to leverage their  creativity into successful products. Larger companies on the order hand often lack the creativity and  speed to exploit their IP.  As a result, smaller and larger businesses need cooperate together to create  and develop products. This co‐creation however is often hindered due to the large differences between  the cooperating companies.   Valuing creativity? A third challenge can be found in the changing nature of the value system. Instead of  tangible assets, intangible assets (R&D, creativity, and people) increasingly represent company’s value.  But how do, for example, “investors value such things as research and development; intellectual capital;  organizational capital (e.g., business strategies and networks); reputational capital (brand recognition);  and information technology?” (Tepper, 2002, p. 165). Buiguis et al. (2000, p. 42) state that “(although)  we want to quantify this capital (...) on a generally understood format this ambition is, however, (often)  frustrated by the multidimensionality of intangible knowledge capital (…)”.  Protection of creativity. Another problem is related to the protection of creativity. Buiguis et al. (2000, p.  48) distinguishes  4 stages of control of property. They argue that intangibles are the most abstract of  the  4  stages  implying  that  they  are  the  most  hard  to  control  and  hence  to  protect.  As  a  result,  cooperating companies starting exchanging intangibles are quite prudent and often use large, detailed  contracts  to  protect  their  own  intangibles  (often  IP).  Furthermore,  they  depend  heavily  on  the  legal  system.  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 11 of 47 
  12. 12. Attracting  money.  Most  businesses  in  the  creative  industry  face  difficulties  in  attracting  traditional  money via bank loans. As a result, they need to attract venture capital not only to grow their business  but even to start them (Bilton, 2007, p. 120).   As a result of all these challenges, it is not surprisingly that Tepper mentions “unquestionably, many of  the old governing assumptions about economic life are changing” (2002, p. 166). As a result, traditional  (IP) cooperation‐ and business models can no longer be applied and become out‐dated. Not surprisingly,  Tepper states on the same page that “perhaps (the) most crucial is the need to link our research and our  strategies for “measuring” the creative industries to realistic, tangible, and practical policy goals”. The  remainder of this literature review is therefore devoted to the search for these new researches and  strategies either in the creative industry or in collaborations.     3.3 COLLABORATION   Collaboration is well defined by Anderson (1995, p. 58) as ‘a strategic mode of integration in which two  or more organizations co‐operate on parts or all stages of production, from the initial phase of research  to marketing and distribution. Collaborative agreements can be short‐term or long‐term and encompass  a  spectrum  of  co‐operation  that  lies  between  outright  merger/  acquisition  and  arms‐length  market  transaction’.   The rationale behind collaborations can vary. Among others, De Man (2004) mentions getting access to  market,  increasing  efficiency,  getting  access  to  new  competencies,  and  the  sharing  of  R&D  risks  as  potential  drivers  for  collaboration.  Arku  (2002)  identified  the  reasons  for  collaborations  while  accounting  for  the  size  of  the  company.  He  showed  that  one  of  the  largest  reasons  for  smaller  companies  to  collaborate  is  to  get  access  to  technological  know‐how  or  to  specialized  skills.  Main  reasons  for  larger  companies  seems  to  be  to  penetrate  new  geographical  markets  or  to  product  markets.    FIGURE 2: MOTIVATION FOR COLLABORATION  If people start to cooperate, whether it is intra‐ or inter organizational, they need to adapt to the new  situation  and  get  training  to  understand  the  cooperating  partner.  Cross‐functional  training  can  help  them to become aware of their own standards and culture and that of the others. Not surprisingly, an  extant body of literature is devoted to the topic of team composition, cross functional training, cultural  diversity.   In  this  study,  collaboration  between  heterogeneous  partners  is  defined  as  collaboration  between  organizations of different sizes; e.g. multinationals (Philips) versus ZZP or Medium‐ and Small Businesses  (NYOYN,  Serious  Toys)  and  of  different  kind,  e.g.  start‐ups  with  knowledge  or  cultural  institutes.  The  focus is on heterogeneous partners in the creative industry.    Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 12 of 47 
  13. 13. 3.4 BUSINESS MODELS   3.4.1 WHAT IS A BUSINESS MODEL?  ‘Business  model’  is  a  frequent  used  and  misused  term  in  literature  and  today’s  business.  There  are  however,  many  different  definitions  in  literature.  Here  are  some  examples  of  what  different  authors  think is a business model;  • A business model describes the rationale of how an organization creates, delivers and captures  value.(Osterwalder, 2009)  • A concise representation of how an interrelated set of decision variables in the areas of venture  strategy, architecture, and economics are addressed to create sustainable competitive  advantage in defined markets.(Morris et al., 2005)  • A business model is an abstract representation of some aspect of a firm’s strategy; it outlines  the essential details one needs to know to understand how a firm can successfully deliver value  to its customers. (Magretta, 2002)  • The business model provides a coherent framework that takes technological characteristics and  potentials as inputs, and converts them through customers and markets into economic  outputs. (Chesbrough and Rosenbloom, 2002)  • We define a business model as a representation of a firm’s underlying core logic and strategic  choices for creating and capturing value within a value network. (Shafer et al., 2005)  What we can learn from these different definitions is that business models perform two important  functions; (1) they create value; (2) they deliver value to a customer; and (3) they capture the value and  turn it into economic output.  In  this  study,  a  business  model  is  defined  as  a  set  of  assumptions  about  how  a  firm  creates  and  appropriates value for all its stakeholders (Dorf and Byers, 2005).  3.4.2 FRAMEWORKS OF BUSINESS MODELS  In literature many authors have defined a business model framework wherein they argue to capture all  the aspects of a business model. There are many different frameworks which vary slightly in structure  and  attributes.  A  framework  very  often  used  is  the  one  of  Morris  et  al.  (2005)  and  Osterwalder  and  Pigneur (2009). This section will discuss both frameworks   3.4.2.1   F RAMEWORK OF  M ORRIS   To develop a useful framework, it must be reasonable simple, logical, measurable, comprehensive and  operationally meaningful. Therefore the authors proposed a framework which consists of three specific  levels of decision making; (1) the foundation level; (2) proprietary level; and (3) Rules level. These levels  represent  the  different  managerial  purposes  of  the  model.  The  foundation  level  addresses  basic  decisions that all entrepreneurs must make (e.g. how to create value? For whom to create value?). The  proprietary  level  purpose  is  to  enable  development  of  unique  combinations  among  decision  variables  that should result  in marketplace  advantage.  This  level  makes  it  possible to  customize  the  framework  and  focus  on  how  value  is  being  created  within  the  6  decision  variables,  which  will  be  discussed  hereafter.  The  rule  level,  enables  the  framework  to  be  useful,  and  delineates  guiding  principles  governing execution of decisions made at level one and to. (Morris et al., 2005)  Morris (2005) specified 6 different factors, which can be applied on the 3 levels discussed above. They  differentiate between;  1. Factors related to offering (how do you create value?)  2. Market factors (whom you create value for?)  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 13 of 47 
  14. 14. 3. Internal capability factors (what is your source of competence?)  4. Competitive strategy factors (how do you competitively position yourself?)  5. Economic factors (how do you make money?)  6. Growth/exit factors (what is your time, scope and size ambitions)  The  business  model,  thus  results  in  a  matrix  with  18  different  sections,  wherein  a  unique  business  concept can be developed or described. The latter is done for Southwest Airlines, as illustrated in Figure  3. This hopefully gives some insights in how this method works.    FIGURE 3: CHARACTERIZING THE BUSINESS MODEL OF SOUTHWEST AIRLINES (MORRIS ET AL., 2005)  3.4.2.2   B USINESS  C ANVAS BY  O STERWALDER    Another  recent  developed  framework  by  Osterwalder  and  Pigneur  (2009)  is  applied  very  often  in  practice because it is plain and simple. Their so called ‘business model canvas’ (Figure 4) allows to easily  describe  and  manipulate  business  models.  It  consists  out  of  nine  basic  building  blocks  that  show  the  logic of how a company intends to make money. The Business canvas and the nine building blocks are  illustrated and discussed below.  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 14 of 47 
  15. 15.   FIGURE 4 BUSINESS MODEL CANVAS (OSTERWALDER & PIGNEUR, 2009)  1.  Customer  Segments  (CS):  An  organization  serves  one  or  several  customer  segments.  It  can  serve  a  mass market which is often the case in the consumer electronic market. It can however also serve niche  markets which are most likely to be found in an intensive supplier‐buyer relationship as is the case in the  car industry. More types of customer segmentation can be distinguished like Segmented, Diversified and  Multi‐sided platforms customer segments.    2.  Value  Propositions  (VP):  A  business  seeks  to  solve  customer  problems  and  satisfy  customer  needs  with  value  propositions.  Value  proposition  can  for  example  focus  on  the  newness  of  the  product,  its  performances,  the  associated  risk  reduction, or  its  customization. Furthermore,  they  can  either  be  quantitative or qualitative.  3. Channels (CH): Value propositions are delivered to customers through communications, distribution,  and  sales  channels.  They  involve  different  phases  like  the  creation  of  product  awareness  or  the  convincement  of customers to actually  buy the product. Channels  can  either be direct or indirect and  either be an owned channel or a partner channel.  4.  Revenue  Streams  (RS):  Revenue  streams  result  from  value  propositions  successfully  offered  to  customers. These can come from direct asset sale, usage fees, licensing, brokerage fees or advertising.  Furthermost, pricing can be different depending on the type of revenue stream. Pricing can be dynamic  (i.e.  prices  change  based  on  market  conditions)  such  as  auctions  real‐time  market,  yield  management  and negotiation. Prices can also be fixed (i.e. predefined prices are based on static variables) such as list  price, product feature dependent, customer segment dependent and volume dependent pricing.  5.  Key  Resources  (KR):  Key  resources  are  the  assets  required  to  offer  and  deliver  the  previously  described elements. These can be physical, intellectual, human, and financial.  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 15 of 47 
  16. 16. 6. Key  Activitities  (KA):  describes  the  most  important  things  a  company  must  do  to  make  its  business  model  work.  Mostly  key  activities  are  categorized  as  follows:  production,  problem  solving  (i.e.  new  solutions for individual customers) and platform/network (e.g. Ebay, Microsoft and Visa credit card)  7.  Key  partnership  (KP):  This  aspect  describes  the  network  of  suppliers  and  partners  that  make  the  buisness model work. Companies forge partnerships for many reasons and partnerships are becoming a  cornerstone of many business models. Overall there are three motivations for creating partnerships: (1)  optimization  and  economy  of  scale,  which  is  the  most  basic  form  of  a  partnership  and  is  designed  to  optimize  the  allocation  of  resources  and  activities;  (2)  Reduction  of  risk  and  uncertainty  is  another  motivation to partner with other companies; and (3) few companies own all the resources to perform  the activities, so they partner to get acquisition of particular resources and activities.  Osterwalder (2009) furthermore distinguishes four types of partnerships: Strategic alliciances (between  non  competitors),  Coopetition  (strategic  partnership  between  competitors),  Joint  Ventures  and  Buyer‐ supplier relationship.  8. Cost structure (C$): this describes all costs incurred to operate a business model. Low costs structures  are  more  important to  some  business  models  than  to  others. Therefore,  you  can  distinguish  between  two broad costs structures: Cost driven and value driven. Many companies, however fall somewhere in  between.  9: Customer relationship (CR): Customer relationships are established and maintained for each specific  segment. These relationships may differ widely; it can be a relationship that can be defined as personal  assistance, co‐creation or self‐service for example.  3.4.3 TYPE OF BUSINESS MODELS  Some literature tried to investigate the types of business models there are. One example is the research  of Malone et al. (2006). They differentiate two dimensions of what a business does. The first dimension  is about – what types of rights are being sold? – which give rise to 4 basic business models;   (1) ‘the creator’ – buys raw material or components from suppliers and transforms or  assembles them to create a product sold to buyers;  (2) ‘The distributer’ – Buys a product and resells essentially the same product to someone  else;  (3) ‘The landlord’ – Sells the right to use, but not own, an asset for a specified period of  time;  (4) ‘The Broker’ – Facilitates sales by matching potential buyers and sellers. (Malone et al.,  2006)  The Second dimensions is about ‐ what kind of asset is involved? – Which also gives rise to 4 other  dimensions: (1) Financial Assets; (2) Physical Assets; (3) Intangible Assets; and (4) Human Assets. This  results in a total of Sixteen Business models Archetypes as illustrated in Table 2.  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 16 of 47 
  17. 17.     Financial  Physical  Intangible  Human  3 Creator  Entrepreneur  Manufacturer  Inventor  Human Creator   (Kleiner Perkins)  (GM)  (Lucent Bell Labs  Distributor  Financial Trader  Wholesaler/Retailer  IP Trader  Human Distributor4  (Merril Lynch)  (wall Mart)  (NTL Inc.)  Landlord  Financial Landlord  Physical Landlord  Intellectual  Contractor  Landlord  (Citygroup)  (Hertz)  (Accenture)  (Microsoft)  Broker  Financial Broker  Physical Broker  IP Broker  HR Broker  (Charles Schwab)  (eBay)  (Valassis)  (EDS)  TABLE 2: BASIC BUSINESS MODEL ARCHETYPES (MALONE ET AL. 2006)  3.5 COLLABORATION AND BUSINESS MODELS   More information on business models for (heterogeneous) collaborations can be found in the literature  of  open  innovation  and  open  business  models,  and  co‐development  partnerships.  Co‐development  partnerships are used more and more to improve innovation effectiveness (Chesbrough and Schwartz,  2007). For this way of working, innovative business models are in need, which embody mutual working  relationships between two or more parties, and which can promote innovation effectiveness. Note that  this literature is mainly focused on the viewpoint of large corporations, and not from the viewpoint of  the SME or ZZP.   3.5.1 OPEN BUSINESS MODELS: ‘INSIDE‐OUT’ AND ‘OUTSIDE‐IN’   Open Business Models are derived from an article written by Chesbrough (2003) who introduced Open  Innovation. Traditional business models center around the idea of developing products around internal  technologies. However, by using external parties, R&D expenses can be reduced, innovation output can  be  increased,  and  partnering  can  open  up  new  markets  that  may  otherwise  have  been  in  accessible.  “Open  Business  Models  can  be  used  by  companies  to  create  and  capture  values  by  systematically  collaboration with outside partners. This may happen from the ‘outside‐in’ by exploiting external ideas  within  the  firm,  or  from  the  “inside‐out”  by  providing  external  parties  with  ideas  or  assets  lying  idle  within the firm” (Osterwalder and Pigneur, 2009).  An  Open  Innovation  environment,  companies commercializes its  own  innovation  and  ideas,  as  well as  innovation and ideas from other firms. Boundaries between a company and its environment are porous,  enabling innovations to move easily ‘inside‐out’ (i.e. from the firm to its environment) or the other way  around  from ‘outside  in’.  ‘Outside‐in’  innovation  occurs  when  firms bring,  external  ideas,  innovations,  technology, or IP inside the boundaries of the firm, and with the help of these externalities, apply this in  new products or services. Since companies focus on their core‐competence, these ‘outside‐in’ processes  are  increasingly  happening  in  industry.  ‘Inside‐out’  innovation  occurs  when  firms  license  or  sell  their  ideas, innovation, technology, or IP. Licensing models, joint ventures, and spin‐offs are most used within  these Open Business Models.                                                                    3   These  models  are  illegal  in  the  US  and  most  places  today  because  they  involve  selling  human  beings.  They  are  included here for logical completeness.  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 17 of 47 
  18. 18.   FIGURE 5 ‐ OPEN INNOVATION (CHESBROUGH, 2003)  For our study, heterogeneous collaborations between small and big firms are very interesting, how do  their  business  models  look,  or  should  like?  There  are  two  generic  patterns;  the  previous  discussed  ‘outside‐in’  and  ‘inside‐out’  Business  Models  with  typical  characteristics  (Osterwalder  and  Pigneur,  2009) (Table 3)  TABLE 3 ‐ DIFFERENCE BETWEEN OUTSIDE‐IN AND INSIDE‐OUT BUSINESS MODELS (OSTERWALDER & PIGNEUR, 2009)  Outside‐In Pattern  Inside‐Out pattern  Key  Partners:  External  Organizations,  sometimes  from  Value  Propositions:  Some  R&D  outputs  that  are  completely  different  industries,  may  be  able  to  offer  unusable  internally  –  for  strategic  or  operational  valuable  insights,  knowledge,  patents,  or  ready‐made  reasons – may be of high value to organizations in other  products to internal R&D groups  industries  Key  Assets:  Building  on  external  knowledge  requires  Key assets: Organizations with substantial internal R&D  dedicated  activities  that  connect  external  entities  with  possess much unutilized knowledge, technology, and IP.  internal business processes and R&D groups  Due  to  sharp  focus  on  core  businesses,  some  of  these  otherwise  valuable  intellectual  assets  sit  idle.  Such  businesses are good candidates for an ‘inside‐out’ open  business model.  Key Resources:  Taking advantage of outside innovation  Revenue Streams: By enabling others to exploit unused  requires specific resources to build gateways to external  internal ideas, a company adds ‘easy’ additional revenue  networks  streams.  Costs: It costs money to acquire innovation from outside    sources,  But  by  building  on  externally‐created  knowledge  and  advanced  research  programs,  a  company  can  shorten  time‐to‐market  and  increase  its  internal R&D productivity  Channels:  Established  companies  with  strong  brands,    strong  Distribution  Channels,  and  strong  Customer  Relationships  are  well  suited  to  an  Outside‐in  open  business  model.  They  can  leverage  existing  Customer  Relationships  by  building  on  outside  sources  of  innovation  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 18 of 47 
  19. 19. 3.5.2 CO‐DEVELOPMENT PARTNERSHIPS  Collaborations can have serious positive effects but can also bring serious hazards. Chesbrough (2007)  identified four essentials aspects which affect the successfulness of a co‐development partnership;  1. Objectives of the partnership  2. Asses the capabilities you require  3. Business model alignment  4. Future collaborations  The most used objectives which drives partnerships are: increase profitability, shorten time to market,  enhance  innovation  capability,  create  greater  flexibility  in  R&D  and  expansion  of  market  access.  Each  objective  involves  different  implication  for  co‐development  (co‐creation)  and  partner  selection.  And  therefore, it is difficult to generalize business models, because each partnership is different.  Another aspect is the type of capability a company’s needs. Needs can be classified by their importance  for a company. Chesbrough and Schwartz (2007) classified them into three categories: Core, critical and  contextual. Core capabilities are vital to a company’s running business. Partnerships in this category are  the most important, and it is important to manage these (mostly none to very few) partners as best as  possible.  Partnerships  which  affect  critical  capabilities  are  important,  but  not  core  to  the  overall  business, however it may be core to the other partner. Contextual capabilities are necessary but not of  value adding for a business. Partnerships involving creativity are as discussed before often hard to value,  and for that reason also hard to put them into a certain category.   A  source  of  many  problems  within  collaborations  can  be  the  misalignment  of  the  partner’s  business  model. “Aligned Business Models are complementary; if you execute your model well, your partner will  benefit, and vice versa” (Chesbrough and Schwartz, 2007). By assessing a partner’s business model and  comparing it to yours, one can create alignment and develop more valuable partnerships (Chesbrough  and Schwartz, 2007).   Last, by thinking of future opportunities and not only the current needs you enhance the successfulness  and efficiency of collaborations. As Jeff Weedman, Vice President of P&G, once said: “The second deal  takes 1/2 the time of the first deal. The third deal takes 1/3 the time, and so on. And subsequent deals  are not only faster, they tend to be more profitable” (Chesbrough et al., 2006)  3.6 CONCLUSION   This  chapter  identified  a  number  of  challenges  and  characteristics  of  the  creative  industry.  Among  others,  this  industry  is  characterized  by  valuation  difficulties  and  a  lack  of  resources.  These  characteristics give rise to specific challenges for small creative companies, for example when it comes  to  IP  protection  and  the  attraction  of  money.  One  method  to  overcome  these  challenges  is  to  create  (structural) collaboration ties with other companies since it can lead to new market‐ and competencies  access. For these heterogeneous collaborations, specific business models might be needed.    Despite the large amount of professional attention to business models, academic literature on business  models  is  scarce.  We  could  identify  several  frameworks  of  business  models  and  types  of  business  models.  But  insight  on  the  design  and  development  of  business  models  for  (heterogeneous)  collaboration  is  limited,  let  alone  specific  to  the  creative  industry.  Empirical  research  may  help  to  identify  specific  structures  and  patterns  in  the  business  models  with  heterogeneous  collaboration.  So  although some best practice exist, more research towards effective business models for collaboration in  the  creative  industry  is  needed.  It  should  enhance  both  scientist  and  practitioners  to  fully  exploit  the  opportunities in this challenging area.   Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 19 of 47 
  20. 20. 4 IMPORTANT STAKEHOLDERS  One  goal  of  this  study  was  to  identify  important  stakeholders  in  the  field  of  business  models  and  collaboration  in  the  creative  industry.  This  chapter  describes  the  stakeholders  and  briefly  discusses  them.  They  range,  from  small‐  to  larger  businesses  and  from  commercial  (profit)  focused  towards  research focused  organizations,  as  also  depicted  in  Table  1. A  selection  of the  important  stakeholders  has been interviewed.  4.1 STAKEHOLDERS INTERVIEWED  The stakeholders which have been interviewed are mapped to the extent they are subsidized and to the  artifacts they produce (i.e. physical products, services or knowledge), see Figure 6.      Independent  Serious  Verkeersgame  Toys  Cap Gemini  NYOYN  CCF  Experience economy  Waleli  Mediagilde  Waag Society  Sander Limonard (TNO)  Patchingzone  Subsidized  Alice  Paul Grefen  Point one  Eindhoven  Yvonne  Kirkels  Physical products  Services Knowledge     FIGURE 6 ‐ MAP OF STAKEHOLDERS INTERVIEWED   For  all  the  stakeholders  who  have  been  interviewed,  a  brief  description  is  given  below  (listed  in  alphabetical order);  Alice in Eindhoven ‐ Han le Blanc is director of the Alice in Eindhoven, a platform which aims to stimulate,  represent and promote the creative industry in the region.  Cap Gemini ‐ Bas van Oosterhout works at CapGemini and offers consultancy services to listed company  when it comes to new business models.  Creative Conversoin Factory – Hans Robertus is director of the CCF. The CCF aims to valorize unused IP  from Philips to (starting) entrepreneurs, offering all kinds of support to the entrepreneurs. Its director is  Hans Robertus., also in search these entrepreneurs who can receive all kind of coaching. At the moment  CCF has 2 projects in the pipeline.  De  Waag  Society  –  Frank  Kresin.  This  nonprofit  company  coragnization  aims  to  develop  creative  technology  for  the  creative  industry.  They  develop  concepts,  pilots  and  prototypes  for  the  market,  half  under own label, half as a subcontractor.  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 20 of 47 
  21. 21. Fontys  /  TU/e  Yvonne  Kirkels  Ph.D.  researcher.  Her  study  focuses  on  the  role  and  importance  of  knowledge brokers in a network, in the creative indusrtry.  Mediagilde  –  Auke  Ferweda.  Mediagilde  situated  in  Amsterdam  is  a  new  media  incubator  that  coaches  and facilitate starting entrepreneurs.  NYOYN  –  Bart  van  Gogh.  Like  Serious  Toys,  NYOYN  develops  interactive  learning  material  for  children.  Their main product ‘Sound Steps’ has been sold several times and it is expected larger sales volumes are  sold  in  the  near  future.  Bart  is  an  experienced  business  man.  The  IP  in  their  products  is  licensed  from  Philips.  Patchingzone – Anne Nigten. Patchingzone is a transdisciplinary laboratory for innovation where Master,  doctor,  post‐doc  students,  and  professionals  from  different  backgrounds  create  meaningful  contents.  Anne  Nigten  applies  the  process  patching  approach  as  a  main  methodology  for  creative  research  and  development.   Point One – Ronald Begeer. Point one is an innovation program originated by the Dutvh higtech induestry,  knowledge  institutions  and  the  Ministry  of  Economic  Affairs.  It  translates  the  worldwide  developments  from nano‐electronics, embedded systems and mechatronics into social relevant problems.   TNO  ‐  Sander  Limonard  works  at  the  research  institute  TNO  at  the  Information  and  Communication  Technology Department. His main research focuses on new business models in new media ventures.  TU/e  ‐  Paul  Grefen  In  his  book  ‘Mastering  E‐business,  IT  enabled  business  models’  Prof.  Paul  Grefen  of  TU/e explains the domain  of e‐business in a well structured  way, covering the complete spectrum from  business aspects to technology aspects, including attention for business models.   Serious Toys ‐  Willem Fontijn is cofounder of Serious Toys and former employee of Philips Research. They  operate  in  the  e‐learning  market  focusing  on  interactive  products  for  kids.  They  bought  IP  from  Philips  which is the core of their main product ‘TagTile’.  The  Experience  Economy  –  Albert  Boswijk.  The  goals  of  the  Experience  Economy  are  to  become  the  leading body of expertise in Europe in the field and to close the gap between theoretical concepts and an  integrative  body  of  knowledge.  They  aims  to  study,  develop,  and  improve  methodology  for  implementation of experience strategies and concepts.  Verkeersgame ‐  Together with his companion, Olivier Verstappen aims to become a competitive player in  the  online  training  market  of  travel  licenses  by  offering  real  life  car  simulation  tools  (and  theory  questions).  Waleli ‐ Situated in Amsterdam, Waleli’s founder Syte Hamminga aims to develop a commercial hit using  wireless technology. In able to found his multiple projects he offers unique brainstorm services directed at  creating multiple applications for their IP.  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 21 of 47 
  22. 22. 4.2 OTHER STAKEHOLDERS IN THE CREATIVE INDUSTRY  Besides companies and persons who have been interviewed, there are other interesting stakeholders as  well. Other stakeholders can be separated into two parts; (1) stakeholders who are interesting because  of their knowledge about business models and/or knowledge about heterogeneous collaborations; (2)  stakeholders  who  have  experience  on  heterogeneous  collaboration  in  practice.  This  list  is  far  from  complete, but should be seen as a first inventory, which can be used in future to set up collaboration.   Name  Knowledge  Practice  Description  Andrew Bullen  X    IIPCreate EU coordinator (for EU projects)  ASMI  X    AMSI ‐ the Amsterdam Centre for Service Innovation ‐  is  focusing  on  research  and  education  in  "management  of  innovation  in  service  firms  and  service organizations"  Jeroen van Mastrigt   X    HKU – reserach on design models for interdisciplinary  teams.   Kai Pattipilohy  X    Diversion aims to create useful and  creative products  for  the  society  thereby  focusing  on  social  innovative  products.   EXER    X  EXER  is  a  company  specializing  in  leisure  and  cultural  event organization  Liesbeth Jansen    X  Director of the westergas fabriek ‐ livinglabs  Redesign me    X  Redesign  is  a  co‐creation  platform  enabling  business  to join forces in creating products.  Shapeways    X  3D printing company which allows consumers to print  their  own  creative  physic  products.  Because  they  created a community, they are able to develop cheap  3D  printing  solutions.  This  company  is  a  spin‐off  by  Philips.  Volle kracht    X  Small design firm, with an interesting business model  ICT Kring Delft  X  X  ICT  Krings  Delft  aims  to  connect  ICT  knowledge  and        experiences in the regio.  Martijn Kriens  X  X  The  idea  of  iCrowds  is  that  by  letting  many  people  collaborate  through  social  software  it  is  possible  to  create exceptional results. Much more than the results  of just a bunch of individuals working together.  Novay  (Telematica  Instituut  X  X  Novay connects businesses, knowledge institutes‐ and  Twente)  partners, and governmental instititutions to foster ICT  innovations.    Syntens  X  X  Syntens  is  a  network  of  advisors  that  assists  businesses  in  their  innovation  processes.  Remco  Bakker of Syntens focuses on the ICT industry and on  the creation of business models.    TABLE 4: OVERVIEW OF STAKEHOLDERS    Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 22 of 47 
  23. 23. 4.3 CONCLUSION  The list of stakeholders shows a large variety of persons and organizations relevant in one way or the  other to the topic of this study. Further research should definitely focus on some specific sub‐sector or  type  of  collaboration  in  order  to  deliver  useful  guidelines  to  improve  practice  and  create  academic  insight.  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 23 of 47 
  24. 24. 5 BEST PRACTICES AND PROBLEMS  From  the  interviews,  best  practices  and  common  pitfalls  have  been  identified  and  from  some  interviewees, insight in their business model was obtained. The first section discusses most important  issues  on  collaboration  which  are;  (1)  the  importance  of  having  a  network;  (2)  problems  related  to  formalization, contracts, & IP; (3) communication and trust; and (4) heterogeneity in size and discipline.  The  next  section  discusses  business  models  used  within  the  creative  industry  and  will  give  case  descriptions  when  appropriate.  Subsequently,  business  models  for  (heterogeneous)  collaboration  are  discussed. The chapter ends with some conclusions.   5.1 COLLABORATION IN THE CREATIVE INDUSTRY  5.1.1 THE IMPORTANCE OF HAVING A NETWORK  Many of the interviewees mentioned the importance of having a network. A network allows you to tap  into new knowledge, and it can create brokerage opportunity by linking people, firms, or technologies to  create new products.   Tap into different knowledge / competences  TU/e researcher Yvonne Kirkels mentioned the importance of tapping into knowledge beyond  your network. A network can generate interesting opportunities via strong and weak ties. She  defined strong ties as direct friends whereas weak ties are defined as connections via a ‘friend  of a friend’.   An example of a weak tie relation that enabled a business to grow can be found at NYOYN. A  good  friend  of  the  director  Bart  was  well  connected  to  a  private  investment  network  that  provided NYOYN the necessary money to start its business. Waleli had the opportunity to use a  strong  tie  relation  to  fund  its  business.  The  person  that  funded  his  business  believed  in  the  entrepreneurial experiences of Siete Hamminga and bought business shares.  Create brokerage opportunities  Mediagilde recognizes that linking people to other people enables business opportunities. They  create brokerage opportunities by connecting people within their network and strive to arrange  for financial support for 60% of their clients. A group that businesses find hard to approach is  talented  students  with  potential  entrepreneurial  skills.  Mediagilde  aims  to  close  this  gap  by  proactively search for talented students via the launch of business cases and campus activities.  Yvonne  Kirkels  also  mentions  this  gap  by  explaining  the  role  of  brokers  in  closing  structural  holes. A structural hole exists when businesses are in need for collaboration but unable to find  each other. A broker can bring these businesses together and close the hole. Han Le Blanc of  Alice  Eindhoven  indicated  that  development  environments  like  Fablab  are  also  very  much  stimulating collaborations and supporting innovation.  5.1.2 FORMALIZATION AND CONTRACTS & IP  Almost all interviewees mention the Intellectual Property challenges in the creative industry.   This is not  surprising  since  IP  is  one  of  the  most  valuable  assets  of  an  organization  and  companies.  However,  protecting IP leads to various problems that seem to be strengthened by the type of industry and the  extent to which creative companies collaborate with larger organizations.   Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 24 of 47 
  25. 25.   Type of industry  Most creative companies manufacture services or products of which the technique is hard to  protect.  This  is  according  to  Auke  Ferwerda  (Mediagilde)  mainly  because  most  creative  companies are to a large extend software based or use techniques that can be used by anyone  (like  GPS  or  RFID).  The  main  added  value  of  creative  companies  can  be  found  in  the  combination of techniques or in the uniqueness of their applications. As a result, companies try  to  protect  these  combinations  or  applications  but  this  is often  difficult.  Furthermore,  it  takes  considerable time before a patent is granted. As a consequence, creative software companies  often put more emphasis into being first to the market, than to secure their IP.   A  good  example  of  this  IP  securing  versus  time  dilemma  can  be  found  in  the  area  of  Iphone  application  development.  Almost  all  software  companies  are  able  to  manufacture  all  existing  Iphone programs.  However,  the  value  is not situated in  the  program itself.  Instead,  the  main  value is created by the company that brings the products earliest to the market.  Note  that  for  creative  companies  of  which  the  IP  is  mainly  positioned  in  the  hardware,  like  NYOYN  or  Serious  Toys,  IP  protection  is  a  much  bigger  issue  than  for  software  companies  (Gogh, 2009; Hietbrink, 2009). These, and more characteristics of this industry will be discussed  in more detail in one of the next sections.  Extra IP problems due to heterogeneous collaborations  Due  to  the  complexity  of  protecting  (creative)  IP,  larger  companies  depend  heavily  on  specialized  lawyers.  Philips,  for  example,  has  an  internal  Intellectual  Property  and  Standards  department  employing  more  than  300  professionals  worldwide.  To  put  this  into  contrast,  De  Waag  Society has one  fulltime  internal  lawyer  assisting  in  IP  issues  and  contract  formulation.  Juridical advice can however also be attracted externally. Mediagilde paid about 50.000 euros  to have a set of highly detailed contracts covering all relevant IP issues.   Typically  these  companies  expect  smaller  companies  to  act  at  the  same  juridical  level  and  specialism as they start to cooperate. However, smaller companies and starting entrepreneurs  often  lack  people,  time  and  money  to  face  these  complicated  IP  issues  as  noted  by  Bart  van  Gogh (NYOYN). And although in some cases larger partner companies are willing to share their  resources most small companies  fail to respond adequately to the juridical demand of larger  companies.  A  typical  example  of  this  problem  is  illustrated  by  NYOYN.    NYOYN  was  one  of  the  first  companies  starting  to  work  with  IP  of  Philips.  Philips  however  approached  NYOYN  multiple  times  as  if  they  were  a  big,  established  multinational  company  by  sending  them  multiple  contracts (30+ pages). NYOYN in turn failed to respond adequately to these contracts since they  did  not  have  the  time  and  knowledge  to  read  and  understand  them  in  detail.  As  a  result,  NYOYN almost decided to quit their cooperation with Philips and to not use its IP.   Although both Philips and NYOYN acknowledge this problem and state that they both learned  their  lessons,  other  companies  also  address  this  issue.  Serious  Toys  owner  Wilbert  Hietbrink  stated that IP negotiations are often very time consuming, and force them to shift their focus  which slow down their product market introduction.    Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 25 of 47 
  26. 26.   5.1.3 COMMUNICATION & TRUST  There are many operational variables which affect a successful collaboration. However only a couple of  these have been mentioned  frequently in  our interviews of which Good communication and Trust the  most.  Many of our interviewees acknowledged these aspects and gave examples of its importance in  successful collaborations.   Good communication  According to Waleli and Mediagilda, communication is one of the most important ingredients in  successful collaboration. Especially in the first stage of the collaboration with external parties, it  is of significant importance to identify the mutual needs and expectations.  Siete Hamminga also emphasized the importance of clarity, honesty, realistic and openness in  communication. Therefore, Waleli communicates in the first stages of a partnership about what  to expect, and for which price. This way of doing business leads to clarity further downstream  the supply chain.  Trust  Trust is a second and essential ingredient in any true collaboration. Trust between partners is  most important, you can gain trust by being realistic, honest and clear all the time. Hamminga  gained confidence by its investors by winning an important entrepreneurial competition in the  Netherlands, and due to his realistic view of its own business.   Trust  can  also  be  gained  by  proof  of  ability,  which  can  be  either  be  shaped  by  previous  successful experiences or by acknowledgements of third parties. Van Gogh has been asked to  be  one  of  the  leaders  of  NYOYN  since  he  showed  15  year  experiences  in  an  international  construction company.   Another way to gain trust is the acknowledgment of your work by a third party as mentioned by  Auke  Ferwarde.  When,  for  example,  ideas  or  products  have  been  promoted  on  sites  like  Engadget  or  Gizmodo,  they  have  been  acknowledged  by  important  gadget  gurus  and  already  received marketing attention.   From  this  section  it  can  be  concluded  that  communication  shapes  the  collaboration  process.  Good  communication in pre‐stages of a co‐development will pay‐off in the end. Furthermore, trust between  companies  is  another  essential  ingredient  in true collaboration,  and  can  be  gained  by proof  of  ability,  and by being realistic, honest, and clear all times.  5.1.4 HETEROGENEITY IN SIZE AND DISCIPLINE  Heterogeneity  between  firms  is  another  important  determinant  in  successful  collaborations.  Heterogeneity can  either  be specified  by  size (e.g. small companies  vs  big  companies)  or by discipline  (e.g. artistic vs Commercial). This paragraph will address both forms of heterogeneity and supports them  with examples out of our 16 interviews.   Small vs. Big (trust vs. Legal)  Many interviewees stress the problems which occur while collaborating with external parties.  One example has already been given which described how NYON got overloaded with contracts  by  the  legal  department  of Philips.  Because of  the  difference  in size,  Philips  is  able  to  have  a  specialized department which can arrange all legal issues. A company like NYON, which consists  Collaboration and Business Models in the Creative Industry  Page 26 of 47 

×