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IIIF as an Enabler to Interoperability within a Single Institution

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A presentation given at the International Image Interoperability Framework event held at the New York Academy of Medicine in New York City on May 11, 2016.

Randy Stern
Harvard University

A presentation given at the International Image Interoperability Framework event held at the New York Academy of Medicine in New York City on May 11, 2016.

Randy Stern
Harvard University

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IIIF as an Enabler to Interoperability within a Single Institution

  1. 1. IIIF as an Enabler to Interoperability within a Single Institution Randy Stern Harvard University IT - Library Technology Services Jeff Emanuel, Jud Harward, Rashmi Singhal Harvard University IT – Academic Technology Services Jeff Steward Harvard Art Museums IIIF Conference – May 11, 2016
  2. 2. Source: https://www.google.com/search?q=silo+image&tbm=isch&imgil=RiQOsTIRwam6LM%253A%253B0mzTRDo1jIO2nM%253Bhttps%25253A%25252F%25252Fwww.youtube.co m%25252Fwatch%25253Fv%2525253DqCSSCM5a6QQ&source=iu&pf=m&fir=RiQOsTIRwam6LM%253A%252C0mzTRDo1jIO2nM%252C_&usg=__RCEVEU6xuv- zNCrk2U7dDEqOrDI%3D&biw=1266&bih=778&ved=0ahUKEwi0gfml6p_MAhWKaD4KHe1gD7MQyjcINA&ei=x9QYV_SBE4rR-QHtwb2YCw#imgrc=RiQOsTIRwam6LM%3A Digital content sharing at Harvard - Before
  3. 3. The goal - IIIF at Harvard - After
  4. 4. Use Cases • The Library: An updated page viewer for the Digital Repository Service – with smooth zoom/pan, 2 page view, etc. • HarvardX: Embedded, annotated display of Harvard Library images in HarvardX courses delivered on the edX platform • Canvas course platform: Display and comparison of Library and faculty-uploaded images in on-campus courses web sites • Harvard Art Museums: Create online exhibits and digital tours with museum image content from the digital repository
  5. 5. IIIF – to the rescue • A common API • Opens Harvard library digital content for reuse over the Web • Allows Harvard to reuse external content • ** Breaks down silos within Harvard, and enables reuse of content
  6. 6. Mirador – a IIIF enabled image viewer for the university
  7. 7. Metadata (Titles, Authors, Subjects, etc.) Digital Images Related Authorities Names, Places Annotations & Transcriptions IIIF Presentation API IIIF Image API Linked Open Data Open Annotation OPEN APIs – Harvard entities can reuse and embed each others content • Library • Canvas/edX Course • Museum TMS Databases • Library • Course Image Sets • Museums • Linked Data for Libraries • CATCH annotation store D a t a s o u r c e s
  8. 8. Annotations – a further opportunity The International Image Interoperability Framework Now • Enhance teaching through faculty commentary • Enhance learning through student discussions • Record private observations Future • Enhance research through collaborative annotation • On manuscripts for textual criticism • On images of art objects for conservation and publication • On collections of visual materials to create a research corpus
  9. 9. Mirador – annotations The International Image Interoperability Framework
  10. 10. Image Media Management LTI application The International Image Interoperability Framework Goals • Filling a gap in Canvas • Faculty–contributed content • Shared through IIIF Future • Seamlessly import image media from any IIIF- compliant repository • Further define, and expand access to, annotation capability
  11. 11. Image Media Management LTI application The International Image Interoperability Framework Goals • Filling a gap in Canvas • Faculty–contributed content • Shared through IIIF
  12. 12. Harvard Museums The International Image Interoperability Framework Goals – Enhance desire to view physical objects – Expand options for comparative images in digital tours platform – Prove museums data is interoperable Future – 3D object viewing – 3D object virtual reconstruction – Viewing of complex living documents like curatorial object files and archives
  13. 13. Harvard Art Museums The International Image Interoperability Framework
  14. 14. So now… • “The Book” is live on edX using images from the library digital repository • The library IIIF service exposes millions of images – http://ids.lib.harvard.edu/ids/iiif/5981214/0,0,1200,1200/full/full/native.jpg • The library has a new book viewer for the digital repository – http://iiif.lib.harvard.edu/manifests/view/drs:5981093$7b • Faculty and teaching staff staff can upload, curate, share, and display IIIF-compliant images in their online and residential courses The Book: Histories Across Time and Space Drawing on the rich collections of Harvard’s libraries and museums, learners are invited to explore the book not simply as a container of content, but as a meaningful physical object that has shaped the way we understand the world around us
  15. 15. And it’s being more widely adopted • HarvardX and Harvard’s Academic Technology Group – Are developing additional LTI image display and annotation tools for use in the Canvas and edX course platforms • The Harvard Art Museums – have deployed a beta of IIIF for image access and viewing and have embedded Mirador in a digital tour builder platform
  16. 16. IIIF Interoperability at Harvard Library IT Digital Humanities Faculty HarvardX Harvard Library IIIF – Open Access Mirador – Open Source Mirador embedded in “The Book” Page Turner for the library Digital Repository IIIF APIs – 100,000 book objects for the world Image Viewer for course web sites Image Viewer for the Art Museums Academic Technology Harvard Art Museums
  17. 17. Brief Chronology • 2010 Harvard library technologists tracking IIIF • 2012 – Focus group of faculty, academic technology, library staff and library technology assess options for a new page turner • 2012 – Harvard commits $40M to and funds a IIIF developer • 2013 – “The Book: Histories Across Time and Space” begins development • 2014 – Harvard Library IIIF services for 120,000 books and manuscripts (5M page images) plus 10M still images • 2015 – “The Book” launches, Art museums IIIF manifest service for 250,000 art objects • 2016 – 3 Mirador-based apps launch: Harvard Library Viewer, Image Media Management LTI-Canvas app, Art museums digital tour builder
  18. 18. Harvard IIIF collaborators Harvard Faculty • Prof. Jeffrey Hamburger (working grp, The Book) • Prof Afsaneh Najmabadi (working grp) • Prof. Peter Der Manuelian (working grp) • Prof. Suzanne Blier (working grp) • Prof. Dan Smail (The Book) • Prof. Ann Blair (The Book) • Prof. Leah Price (The Book) • Prof. Thomas Kelly (The Book) • Prof. Beverly Kienze (The Book) Harvard Academic Technology Services • Jud Harward, Dir. Of Research Computing in the Arts and Humanities • Jeff Emanuel, Assoc. Dir. of Academic Technology • Rashmi Singhal, Senior Software Engineer and co-Lead developer of Mirador (with Drew Winget of Stanford) • Arthur Barrett, Sr. Software Engineer • Jazahn Clevenger, Instructional Software Developer • Brandon Bentley, Sr. Instructional Technologist • Alan Wolf, Managing Director HarvardX • Samantha Earp, Executive Director • Robert Lue, Faculty Director Harvard Library • Franziska Frey, Associate Librarian for Preservation, Conservation and Digital Imaging • Willam Stoneman, Curator of Early Books & Manuscripts • Wendy Gogel, Manager of Digital Content and Projects • Kate Bowers, Collections Services Archivist • Barbara Meloni, Public Services Archivist • Kerry Masteller, Reference and Digital Program Librarian • Mary Clare Alternhofen, Librarian for the Fine Arts Library Harvard Library IT • Tracey Robinson, Managing Director • Randy Stern, Dir. Of Systems Development • Chip Goines, Senior Developer, IIIF and Mirador • Dave Mayo, Developer, Mirador • Janet Taylor, Usability Librarian • Julie Wetherill, Systems Librarian
  19. 19. Continued… Harvard Art Museums • Jeff Steward, Director of Digital Infrastructure and Emerging Technology • Tom Lentz, Director Emeritus Harvard Academic Technology Group • Mike Hilborn, Assoc. Dir. of Academic Technology Development • Annie Rota, Director of Academic Technology
  20. 20. Thank you!

Editor's Notes

  • Harvard has been able to leverage the promise of interoperable APIs by replicating the IIIF/Mirador design pattern across multiple functional areas sharing core Image API and digital repository services. Sharing knowledge, expertise, and digital content, and Mirador, multiple “heads” have sprouted: a viewer application for the HarvardX course “The Book”, a new Harvard Library Viewer, faculty image collections embedded in the Canvas course platform, and walls of images in the Harvard Art Museums. What did it take to enable this level of collaboration in a large distributed organization?
  • Not just silos – worse! – some silos were broken - ancient book viewer, course platform migration left tools behind…
  • Interoperability through commons APIs
  • Mirador – a platform for bring together multiple sources
  • The academic technology group (ATG) identified a need among faculty teaching staff, and students for the ability to to manage and access images and associated metadata for teaching and learning. Harvard’s previous learning management system, called “iSites,” had a feature called the ”Slide Tool” that handled this requirement. Canvas, however, lacks such a feature. ATG took advantage of this gap in Canvas’s coverage to develop a IIIF-compliant, interoperable (LTI) application for the management and display of images.

    This application supports IIIF for image and collection access, and seamlessly integrates with Mirador, IIIF-compliant digital collections, and LTI-compliant learning management systems, including both Canvas and edX, all of which are used for teaching and learning at Harvard.
  • The academic technology group (ATG) identified a need among faculty teaching staff, and students for the ability to to manage and access images and associated metadata for teaching and learning. Harvard’s previous learning management system, called “iSites,” had a feature called the ”Slide Tool” that handled this requirement. Canvas, however, lacks such a feature. ATG took advantage of this gap in Canvas’s coverage to develop a IIIF-compliant, interoperable (LTI) application for the management and display of images.

    This application supports IIIF for image and collection access, and seamlessly integrates with Mirador, IIIF-compliant digital collections, and LTI-compliant learning management systems, including both Canvas and edX, all of which are used for teaching and learning at Harvard.
  • This is a screenshot of a user created digital tour showing comparative images in the Mirador viewer module in the Harvard Art Museums digital tour builder platform. The images are from two different repositories. The image on the left is from the Harvard Art Museums collections (http://www.harvardartmuseums.org/collections/object/156951). The image on the right is from the Digital Commonwealth (https://www.digitalcommonwealth.org/search/commonwealth:bk128t37w).
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