Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Critical theme: tackling
inequality and
unsustainable consumption
Dario Kenner
whygreeneconomy.org
20 April 2016
What I will cover today
1) Why we need to look at the inequality of
unsustainable consumption within countries
2) Targetin...
Targeting the richest
Targeting the richest
• Frequent flyer levy
• Luxury taxes
• Personal carbon budget
Factoring in the environment into policies that aim to reduce
inequality
A governments could use
additional revenue from
t...
Redistribution
• Green Citizen’s income?
• Green conditional cash
transfers?
Summary
1) Need to look at unsustainable consumption within
countries
2) Society wide changes needed. Priority should be t...
Contact
Dario Kenner whygreeneconomy@gmail.com
For some the green economy is the answer to the world's economic and
enviro...
Reducing inequality and unsustainable consumption
Reducing inequality and unsustainable consumption
Reducing inequality and unsustainable consumption
Reducing inequality and unsustainable consumption
Reducing inequality and unsustainable consumption
Reducing inequality and unsustainable consumption
Reducing inequality and unsustainable consumption
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Reducing inequality and unsustainable consumption

1,670 views

Published on

On 20 April, 2016, IIED hosted a discussion meeting to look at how organisations and researchers can develop policies that could reduce inequality and lessen the impact of over-consumption on the environment.

The 'critical theme' event also looked at some potential policies that could successfully target extreme consumption.

The seminar was introduced by IIED seniorn researcher Essam Yassin Mohammed, and included this presentation by independent researcher Dario Kenner on 'Reducing inequality and unsustainable consumption'.

In 2013 Kenner launched the Why Green Economy? website (http://whygreeneconomy.org/) with the aim of providing a space to share ideas on a new economic model to tackle climate change and protect the environment.

More details: http://bit.ly/1VEEaAs

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Reducing inequality and unsustainable consumption

  1. 1. Critical theme: tackling inequality and unsustainable consumption Dario Kenner whygreeneconomy.org 20 April 2016
  2. 2. What I will cover today 1) Why we need to look at the inequality of unsustainable consumption within countries 2) Targeting the richest at a time of carbon inequality 3) Policies to reduce inequality and unsustainable consumption together
  3. 3. Targeting the richest
  4. 4. Targeting the richest • Frequent flyer levy • Luxury taxes • Personal carbon budget
  5. 5. Factoring in the environment into policies that aim to reduce inequality A governments could use additional revenue from taxing the richest to: • Invest in renewable energy • Resources for adaptation • Provide free and green public services • Promote the circular economy.
  6. 6. Redistribution • Green Citizen’s income? • Green conditional cash transfers?
  7. 7. Summary 1) Need to look at unsustainable consumption within countries 2) Society wide changes needed. Priority should be to target the richest but difficult at time of extreme inequality. 3) Policies to reduce ecological footprint of the richest in the global north and global south 4) Factor the environment in to policies that aim to reduce inequality
  8. 8. Contact Dario Kenner whygreeneconomy@gmail.com For some the green economy is the answer to the world's economic and environmental crises, while for others it is a false solution. The website Why Green Economy? is a space to share ideas from across the world on a new economic model to tackle climate change and protect the environment. whygreeneconomy.org This presentation is based on two pieces of research published by the Global Sustainability Institute at Anglia Ruskin University: Reducing inequality and carbon footprints within countries (February 2016) The inequality of overconsumption: the ecological footprint of the richest (November 2015)

×