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COUNTRY PROGRESS AND
CHALLENGES
Zambia Country presentation
Absalom Sakala
1. Top people and processes you have engaged
with/influenced
• Officials in the Ministry of National Development Planning,...
2. Top change achieved or expected
• The expected reflection of biodiversity in the National Development Plan
and not just...
3. Top lessons about successful mainstreaming
• Mainstreaming as a process is about identifying and seizing opportunities ...
4. Top challenge/problem where you need help
• Sectors working in silos
• Inconsistencies in funding
• Influencing decisio...
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Biodiversity mainstreaming in Zambia: progress and challenges

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In this presentation, Absalom Sakala, a project team member from Zambia, highlights progress made and some of the challenges faced in the country.

He describes how the project engaged with officials in key ministries, but that getting biodiversity concerns into the policies and plans of government ministries and private sector companies can take time.

The slides were presented at the ‘Biodiversity mainstreaming’ workshop held in Sogakope, Ghana, from 1-3 November 2016.

More information: www.iied.org/nbsaps

Published in: Environment
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Biodiversity mainstreaming in Zambia: progress and challenges

  1. 1. COUNTRY PROGRESS AND CHALLENGES Zambia Country presentation Absalom Sakala
  2. 2. 1. Top people and processes you have engaged with/influenced • Officials in the Ministry of National Development Planning, which is spearheading the formulation of the Seventh National Development Plan (7NDP) 2017-2020; • The formulation process of the 7NDP process, resulting in one "team member" from the mainstreaming team, invited to serve on the technical team finalizing the 7NDP; • Government officials from other key ministries such as a Finance, wildlife, agriculture, mines, energy through national stakeholders meeting other follow up sessions
  3. 3. 2. Top change achieved or expected • The expected reflection of biodiversity in the National Development Plan and not just reflected broadly as cross cutting environmental issues; • Contributed to the impetus on putting value on biodiversity through on- going processes of the Biofin and The Nature Conservancy (TNC); • Contributed to increased awareness of biodiversity issues building on the NBSAP formulation process; • Smart planning adoption • Contribution to identification of national and regional priority areas for biodiversity conservation and create information maps which will guide mainstreaming biodiversity into national Plans and integration into provincial and local planning decisions.
  4. 4. 3. Top lessons about successful mainstreaming • Mainstreaming as a process is about identifying and seizing opportunities that present themselves; • The champions of mainstreaming in key institutions are not necessarily the top level policy makers such as Permanent Secretaries or Ministers, but technocrats who buy into the concept can influence decisions (exclusive engagement with MNDP in Second workshop resulted in actual engagement in 7NDP) • To ensure effective mainstreaming of the NBSAP there is need to expand the engagement with both the Ministry of Finance (MoF) and Ministry of National Development Planning. • Mainstreaming requires convincing and commitment among team members • Getting biodiversity concerns into the policies and plans of government ministries and private sector companies is a goal that can take many years to achieve. • Realised that economic valuation of biodiversity assets and ecosystem services are useful tools for engaging ministries of finance and national planning and building a business case for biodiversity.
  5. 5. 4. Top challenge/problem where you need help • Sectors working in silos • Inconsistencies in funding • Influencing decision makers • Developing a ‘business case’ for biodiversity • entrenched ideologies, limited capacity, the challenge of connecting biological sciences with the social and economic discourse used by development planners

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