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Gender in Agriculture for Nutrition and Health

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This poster was presented by Hazel Malapit (A4NH / IFPRI) for the pre-Annual Scientific Conference meeting organized for the CGIAR research program gender research coordinators on 4 December.
The annual scientific conference of the CGIAR collaborative platform for gender research took place on 5-6 December 2017 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, where the Platform is hosted (by KIT Royal Tropical Institute).

Read more: http://gender.cgiar.org/gender_events/annual-scientific-conference-capacity-development-workshop-cgiar-collaborative-platform-gender-research/

Published in: Environment
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Gender in Agriculture for Nutrition and Health

  1. 1. GENDER IN NARRATIVE KEY CONCEPTS CONTRIBUTIONS TO A CGIAR GENDER RESEARCH FRAMEWORK IMPROVED FOOD AND NUTRITION SECURITY FOR HEALTH IMPROVED NATURAL RESOURCE SYSTEMS AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES GENDER RESEARCH QUESTIONS RESEARCH OUTCOMES BY IMPACT PATHWAY IDOs AND CROSS-CUTTING IDOs • How do gender relations influence of the choice of what is produced, what foods to buy, and how safe and nutritious foods are allocated within households? • How do production choices influence women’s work load and their own and their families’ health and nutritional status? • What context-specific strategies can be used to engage women more equitably in markets for nutritious and safe foods? What constraints do women face in the distribution and transportation of their products to markets? • Do men’s and women’s preference for the way food is prepared and the choice of preservation methods have a differential effect on nutrition and food safety? • How should biofortified crops be delivered to meet men, women and girls’ preferences and nutritional needs, support gender- equitable decision-making in production and consumption decisions, and avoid harm to women’s time, work burden and health status? • How can adoption of biofortified crops be promoted by targeting appropriate household decision-makers, including men? REDUCED POVERTY Improved diets for poor and vulnerable people Improved food safety Improved human and animal health Increased incomes and employment Enhanced smallholder market access More sustainably managed agro-ecosystems CROSS- CUTTING ISSUES Mitigation and adaptation achieved Equity and inclusion achieved Enabling environment improved National partners and beneficiaries enabled Increased productivity Agri-food Value Chains Pathway • Producers: will use inputs and capacity to supply biofortified, safe, and nutritious foods • Chain agents: will use methods and tools to assess and enhance nutrients • Consumers or those who make decisions about their diets: will make more informed demand choices regarding nutritious and safe foods • Regulators: will ensure appropriate, effective, food safety systems IMPROVED FOOD AND NUTRITION SECURITY FOR HEALTH IMPROVED NATURAL RESOURCE SYSTEMS AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES GENDER RESEARCH QUESTIONS RESEARCH OUTCOMES BY IMPACT PATHWAY IDOs AND CROSS-CUTTING IDOs SLOs • How can policymakers develop cross-sectoral, gender-responsive policies? • How can policy reform provide support for more egalitarian gender roles that support good health and nutrition? • How does national policy affect the ability of female farmers to have equal opportunity for success in integrated agriculture programs? • What types of integrated policy actions can ensure that women and men benefit equally from integrated ANH programs? • What models can be recommended to partners looking for agricultural programs to address health and nutrition problems among women and children in the 1000 days window of opportunity? Policies Pathway • Policymakers and investors: have greater capacity to access and choose most appropriate sectoral responses and investments based on impact evidence • Intergovernmental agencies: will have stronger evidence- based tools and approaches to transfer to decision makers • Stakeholders (civil society organizations, industry groups): have access to evidence and tools and use them to inform their positions and strategies REDUCED POVERTY Improved diets for poor and vulnerable people Improved food safety Improved human and animal health Increased incomes and employment Enhanced smallholder market access More sustainably managed agro-ecosystems CROSS- CUTTING ISSUES Mitigation and adaptation achieved Equity and inclusion achieved Enabling environment improved National partners and beneficiaries enabled Increased productivity IMPROVED FOOD AND NUTRITION SECURITY FOR HEALTH IMPROVED NATURAL RESOURCE SYSTEMS AND ECOSYSTEM SERVICES GENDER RESEARCH QUESTIONS RESEARCH OUTCOMES BY IMPACT PATHWAY IDOs AND CROSS-CUTTING IDOs • How do the health risks and benefits of agriculture –exposure to agricultural diseases, strategic to manage risks, and the impacts of diseases – vary by gender? • How are gender dynamics and women’s decision-making power associated with improved child and women’s nutrition outcomes? • How can programs increase men’s support for women’s important roles as guardians in their families’ health and nutrition? • How can agricultural development interventions enhance women’s status while avoiding harm to women’s time and health? • How can programs proactively include and empower women so that they can harness resources for their own and their families’ health and nutrition? • What social and cultural adaptations need to be made for programs to be effective in specific contexts? • What gender-responsive tools and methodologies can be developed to evaluate the impact of nutrition-sensitive agricultural programs Development Programs Pathway • Development program implementers (governments and NGOs): will use research evidence to improve targeting, design, and evaluation of ANH programs • Public health program implementers: will design appropriate and effective disease control and surveillance programs based on risk and benefit evidence REDUCED POVERTY Improved diets for poor and vulnerable people Improved food safety Improved human and animal health Increased incomes and employment Enhanced smallholder market access More sustainably managed agro-ecosystems CROSS- CUTTING ISSUES Mitigation and adaptation achieved Equity and inclusion achieved Enabling environment improved National partners and beneficiaries enabled Increased productivity Agri-Food Value Chains Impact Pathway Policy Impact Pathway Development Programs Impact Pathway • Developing indicators, tools, and approaches for measuring women’s empowerment in agriculture (Project WEAI, “Reach, Benefit, Empower” framework) • Expanding gender-agriculture-nutrition pathways to include other links to other human health issues (FP5) • Incorporating gender into research from a food systems/diets perspective • Expanding focus of cross-cutting research to explicitly include equity and empowerment as well as gender GENDER: A social category usually associated with being a man or woman that encompasses economic, social, political, and cultural attributes, opportunities, roles, and responsibilities EQUITY: The principle that people should be treated as equals; guided by the principles of equal life chances, equal concern for people’s needs, and meritocracy EMPOWERMENT: Expansion of people’s ability to make strategic life choices, particularly in contexts where this ability has been denied Pathways between gender, nutrition, and health: • Impact of gender-based differences on nutrition- and health-related outcomes • Improving nutrition through women’s empowerment • Avoiding unintended consequences of women’s well-being and empowerment Women have always been at the forefront of A4NH’s research in nutrition and health. Children of nutrient-deficient women are more likely to experience poor development, morbidity, and mortality, and women are more likely than men to suffer from nutritional deficiencies. Phase I research demonstrated that gender matters for both women’s nutritional status and the pathways linking agriculture to nutrition and health. In Phase 2, A4NH will focus on gender research at the CRP and flagship levels, and expand the focus of its cross-cutting research to include equity and empowerment, guided by the Gender, Equity, and Empowerment (GEE) unit. RESEARCH PRIORITIES Flagship 1: Food Systems for Healthier Diets • Value chain interventions for achieving improved nutrition • Investigating how gender interacts with different points in the food chain, including food choices • Importance of gender in understanding countries’ food systems Flagship 2: Biofortification • Integration of gender in hypothesis development, data collection, and analysis • Re-analysis of previously collected data through a gender lens • Including the Women’s Empowerment in Agriculture Index (WEAI) in assessment studies of biofortified crops Flagship 3: Food Safety • Integration of gender issues in aflatoxin research • Importance of involving women in food safety interventions and supporting women to engage in formal markets • Development of tools and metrics to assess food safety that consider bender- based barriers to technology adoption Flagship 4: Supporting Policies, Programs, and Enabling Action through Research • Exploring new platforms to empower women in agriculture • Developing new approaches to sensitize men about gender roles and equity Flagship 5: Improving Human Health • Gender differentials in exposure to health risks • Gender differences in health benefits from agriculture • Gender-inclusive decision-making for agricultural intensification • How to engage men to support better health outcomes Strategic Cross-Cutting Gender Research • Building evidence on key conceptual and methodological questions • Developing and validating indicators, tools, and metrics to measure impact along the gender-nutrition-health pathways • Adapting and validating a project-level Women’s Empowerment in agriculture Index through the Gender, Agriculture, and Assets Project, Phase 2 (GAAP2)

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