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Assessing Institutional Innovations to promote women-led informal seed systems in Eastern India

This presentation was given by Ranjitha Puskur (IRRI), as part of the Capacity Development Workshop hosted by the CGIAR Collaborative Platform for Gender Research. The event took place on 7-8 December 2017 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, where the Platform is hosted (by KIT Royal Tropical Institute).

Read more: http://gender.cgiar.org/gender_events/annual-scientific-conference-capacity-development-workshop-cgiar-collaborative-platform-gender-research/

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Assessing Institutional Innovations to promote women-led informal seed systems in Eastern India

  1. 1. Assessing Institutional Innovations to promote women-led informal seed systems in Eastern India Ranjitha Puskur, Swati Nayak, Manzoor Dar 7 Dec 2017, Amsterdam
  2. 2. Reasons for discontinued use of STRV 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Late maturing Requires high skill Low yield Insufficient land Seed not available/accessible Sahbhagi dhan % of respondents 0 10 20 30 40 Not pest/disease resistant Requires high skill Early flowering or maturity Seed not available/accessible Low yield Swarna sub1 % of respondents
  3. 3. Reasons for not cultivating STRV 0 20 40 60 80 100 Requires high skill Not aware of the establishment practices Insufficient land Not aware of variety/seed availability Seed not available/accessible Sahbhagi dhan % of respondents 0 20 40 60 80 100 Not aware of the establishment practices Low yield Not aware of variety/seed availability Insufficient land Seed not available/accessible Swarna sub1 % of respondents
  4. 4. 49.2 52.2 62.2 020406080100 Others Farm saved/Farm produced 64.9 52.3 68.0 0 20 40 60 80 100 Improved Improved (STRV) Traditiona l Seed Source Plots of female headed households Plots of male headed households *Plotwise data
  5. 5. Women-led Seed System Models M1: Community-based seed reinvestment model Location: Odisha Leading agencies: Multiple NGOs & Dept. of Agrlculture  Individual seed production  Women SHG-led aggregation  Obligatory contribution to community seed reserve  Women SHG-led seed dissemination  No financial transaction  Informal institutional arrangements through Women self-help groups M2: Village level seed bank and seed business model Location: Uttar Pradesh Leading agency: RGMVP  Individual seed production  Seedbank at SHG Village Organization level  Seedbank-led aggregation  Voluntary contribution to seed reserve  Financial transactions  Connected to local market M3: Private company led seed production and aggregation engaging WSHGs Location: Uttar Pradesh Leading agency: GEAG  Individual farmer level production  Village Resource Committee (VRC) managed  Women SHGs involved and engaged in seed collection and processing  VRC led aggregation  Branding and marketing (As truthfully labelled M4: Farmer Producer Company (FPC) Location: Uttar Pradesh Leading Agency: GDS  A multi commodity FPC  Some women members in FPC  Individual production and member led aggregation  FPC governed seed production and marketing  Governing body for operations
  6. 6. Research questions • How do the different institutional models with diverse ways and extent of engaging women contribute to their economic empowerment and entrepreneurial capacity? • What factors influence sustainability and viability of the various models? How are they affected by the gender gaps in access to resources and services? Do collectives play a role in addressing the challenges? • How does women’s engagement in seed systems influence and be influenced by the intra household/community gender relations, social and cultural norms and, behaviour and attitudes in different socio-economic and cultural contexts? Does this vary by caste or economic status of the households? • What is the efficacy of these institutional innovations in improving access to good quality affordable seed? What are the key challenges and opportunities in scaling out such models?
  7. 7. • Mixed methods – Survey – FGDs, KI Interviews with Seed VC actors
  8. 8. Pic credit: Vinaynath Reddy

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This presentation was given by Ranjitha Puskur (IRRI), as part of the Capacity Development Workshop hosted by the CGIAR Collaborative Platform for Gender Research. The event took place on 7-8 December 2017 in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, where the Platform is hosted (by KIT Royal Tropical Institute). Read more: http://gender.cgiar.org/gender_events/annual-scientific-conference-capacity-development-workshop-cgiar-collaborative-platform-gender-research/

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