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Mining & Biodiversity Conservation Management
February 13, 2014
Mitigation Hierarchy
Mine Albert, Quebec, before
and after reclamation
Mine Albert, Quebec, before
and after reclamation
Trojan Pond, BC
Lumby Mine Tailings
Pond Before and
After
Grizzly bears utilizing a
reclaimed mine area.
Open pit coal mine waste
dump after re-vegetation to
forestry and wildlife ...
Jwaneng Mine and Game
Reserve: Botswana
Privilege to operate – getting
community support is key
•

A 2008 study of 190 oil and gas projects by Goldman Sachs showe...
Towards Sustainable Mining:
Mining and Biodiversity Framework
MAC members accept that a corporate commitment to biodiversi...
Biodiversity Conservation
Management Protocol
The protocol consists of three performance
indicators:
1. Corporate biodiver...
Biodiversity Offsets
Increasing numbers of
companies are making
‘no net loss’ or ‘net
positive gain’
commitments and need
...
Drivers of biodiversity conservation and
offsets

• Maintain access to resources (access to land for
exploration and possi...
Offsets: Restoring Wetlands at Great Salt
Lake
•

The Inland Sea Shorebird Reserve
near Salt Lake City

•

Created by Rio ...
Community Biodiversity Planning in Burkina Faso
• IAMGOLD’s Essakane mine in Burkina
Faso has been working with the local
...
Future challenges
• Implementation
• Additionality, community engagement, measurement and
metrics, long-term management an...
For additional information

Ben Chalmers
Vice President, Sustainable Development
bchalmers@mining.ca
www.mining.ca

21
Mining & Biodiversity Conservation Management
Mining & Biodiversity Conservation Management
Mining & Biodiversity Conservation Management
Mining & Biodiversity Conservation Management
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Mining & Biodiversity Conservation Management

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Written by Ben Chalmers, Vice President, Sustainable Development, Mining Association of Canada

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Mining & Biodiversity Conservation Management

  1. 1. Mining & Biodiversity Conservation Management February 13, 2014
  2. 2. Mitigation Hierarchy
  3. 3. Mine Albert, Quebec, before and after reclamation
  4. 4. Mine Albert, Quebec, before and after reclamation
  5. 5. Trojan Pond, BC
  6. 6. Lumby Mine Tailings Pond Before and After
  7. 7. Grizzly bears utilizing a reclaimed mine area. Open pit coal mine waste dump after re-vegetation to forestry and wildlife end land use.
  8. 8. Jwaneng Mine and Game Reserve: Botswana
  9. 9. Privilege to operate – getting community support is key • A 2008 study of 190 oil and gas projects by Goldman Sachs showed that lead times to production had almost doubled in the previous decade. A follow-up study found that nearly half of the risks facing projects were non-technical in nature, with ‘stakeholder-related’ risks being the single biggest issue. • The costs resulting from delays associated with community conflicts are substantial. A day’s delay for a mineral exploration project costs approximately $10,000. For a major mining project, the costs of every week of delayed production soar to an estimated $20 million in net present value terms. • These risks are recognized by many business leaders. Ernst & Young has consistently rated ‘maintaining a social license to operate’ among the top business risks facing the mining sector over the past six years.
  10. 10. Towards Sustainable Mining: Mining and Biodiversity Framework MAC members accept that a corporate commitment to biodiversity conservation is essential and have agreed to the following commitments to ensure biodiversity conservation is managed effectively by: • Working to positively contribute to biodiversity conservation • Working with key communities of interest to implement responsible policies and practices • Being transparent through public reporting on issues related to mining and biodiversity conservation • Respecting protected areas and working with key COI on the establishment of protected areas • Not exploring or developing mines in World Heritage sites.
  11. 11. Biodiversity Conservation Management Protocol The protocol consists of three performance indicators: 1. Corporate biodiversity conservation commitment, accountability and communications 2. Facility-level biodiversity conservation planning and implementation 3. Biodiversity conservation reporting Level A: • Demonstrated senior management commitment to biodiversity conservation management • Defined responsibilities for implementing the corporate commitment • Implementation of a management system for significant biodiversity aspects • Reporting system for internal and external reporting is in place
  12. 12. Biodiversity Offsets Increasing numbers of companies are making ‘no net loss’ or ‘net positive gain’ commitments and need tools to meet those commitments Example: Rio Tinto and biodiversity - working towards Net Positive Impact
  13. 13. Drivers of biodiversity conservation and offsets • Maintain access to resources (access to land for exploration and possibly for operations) • Strengthen access to capital, e.g., revised IFC requirements • Strengthen privilege to operate • Facilitate adherence to national legislation where this already exists • First-mover advantage in advance of regulation
  14. 14. Offsets: Restoring Wetlands at Great Salt Lake • The Inland Sea Shorebird Reserve near Salt Lake City • Created by Rio Tinto’s Kennecott copper mine in partnership with the US Army • Offsets the loss of 460 hectares of wetlands when the company expanded its tailings impoundment in 1996. • The Reserve is now used by 120,000 shorebirds, waders and other water fowl each year. More than 200 bird species have been recorded.
  15. 15. Community Biodiversity Planning in Burkina Faso • IAMGOLD’s Essakane mine in Burkina Faso has been working with the local community to improve local biodiversity. • Over 100,000 trees have been planted • All native species • Many have special utilitarian or cultural importance to the local population • Although the community forests are only a few years old, the participatory and community-driven process has already proven successful in providing direct benefits as a source of food, fodder, natural pharmaceuticals, wildlife habitat and shade.
  16. 16. Future challenges • Implementation • Additionality, community engagement, measurement and metrics, long-term management and financial security • Costs • Multiple overlay of legislation • Ratios and multipliers • Transaction costs • Integration • Combining financial lender requirements with national frameworks • Severance of liability • Placing a cap on liability under appropriate legal frameworks
  17. 17. For additional information Ben Chalmers Vice President, Sustainable Development bchalmers@mining.ca www.mining.ca 21

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