The inspection of provision for disabled
pupils and those with special educational
needs: the Ofsted perspective
Charlie H...
The identification of special educational need
Disability and special educational need
A person has a disability when a person has a
physical or mental impairment which ...
Disability and special educational need


Children have special educational needs if they have a learning
difficulty whic...
Disability and special educational need
Children must not be regarded as having a learning difficulty
solely because the l...
The identification of special educational need

The Code of Practice – statutory guidance
Graduated approach to identifica...
The identification of special educational need



Just over one in five pupils - 1.7 million school-age children
are iden...
The types of provision available in England for
disabled pupils and those who have special
educational needs
 Mainstream schools – most pupils with special educational
needs attend mainstream schools alongside other pupils.
 Spec...


Residential special schools provide residential
accommodation as well as education. They are mainly provided
by indepen...
Ofsted inspections of schools

What we focus on through school inspection
and how we carry inspection out
The school inspection framework

Overall effectiveness
Four levels of performance

Four key judgements

1. Outstanding

Ac...
Latest inspection outcomes
Achievement of pupils at the school








The learning and progress
across year groups of different
groups of pupils...
For those groups of pupils whose cognitive ability is such that their
attainment is unlikely ever to rise above ‘low’, the...
Aspects of outstanding achievement


From each different starting point, the proportions of
pupils making expected progre...
Aspects of outstanding achievement


Pupils develop and apply a wide range of skills to great
effect in reading, writing,...
The quality of teaching



The most important role of teaching is to promote learning
and to raise pupils’ achievement.

...
The quality of teaching






Does teaching
engage and include
all pupils?

Are pupils gaining in
knowledge, skills
and...
Quality of teaching in the school

These descriptors should not be used as a checklist. They must be applied
adopting a ‘b...
Outstanding teaching



The teaching of reading, writing, communication and mathematics
is highly effective and cohesivel...
Pupils’ behaviour and safety










The extent to which
pupils’ attitudes help
or hinder their
progress in lessons...
Leadership and management


How well is a culture of
high expectations fostered?

Robust self-evaluation
Well-focussed im...
Leadership and management
Securing pupils’ progress in reading,
writing and mathematics




To what extent does the
curr...
Leadership /management


Do safeguarding
arrangements meet
statutory requirements?

Safe recruitment –single central
reco...
The management of an inspection
The management of an inspection
Her Majesty’s Inspectors (HMI)
Additional Inspectors managed by Inspection Service
Provide...
Inspectors:



spend as much time as possible in classes, observing
lessons, talking to pupils about their work, gauging
...
The frequency of inspection depends on the judgement
at its last inspection and on-going risk assessment.


Mainstream sc...
How we report our inspection findings
Grading of judgements

Reports are short – but schools also have dialogue and feedback
Reports are set out to make clear
how schools should seek to improve
Recommendations
Recommendations
Charlie Henry - The inspection of provision for disabled pupils and those with special educational needs: the Ofsted persp...
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Charlie Henry - The inspection of provision for disabled pupils and those with special educational needs: the Ofsted perspective - IEFE Forum 2014

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Charlie Henry
The inspection of provision for disabled pupils and those with special educational needs: the Ofsted perspective
IEFE Forum 2014

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Charlie Henry - The inspection of provision for disabled pupils and those with special educational needs: the Ofsted perspective - IEFE Forum 2014

  1. 1. The inspection of provision for disabled pupils and those with special educational needs: the Ofsted perspective Charlie Henry Her Majesty’s Inspector National Lead for Disability and Special Educational Need The Office for Standards in Education, Children’s Services and Skills (Ofsted) United Kingdom International Exhibition and Forum for Education (IEFE) Riyadh, February 2014
  2. 2. The identification of special educational need
  3. 3. Disability and special educational need A person has a disability when a person has a physical or mental impairment which has a substantial and long term adverse effect on that person’s ability to carry out normal day to day activities. Most but not all children who are disabled have special educational needs.
  4. 4. Disability and special educational need  Children have special educational needs if they have a learning difficulty which calls for special educational provision to be made for them.  Children have a learning difficulty if they:  a) have a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of children of the same age; or b) have a disability which prevents or hinders them from making use of educational facilities of a kind generally provided for children of the same age in schools within the area of the local education authority c) are compulsory school age and fall within the definition at (a) or (b) above or would so do if special educational provision was not made for them. Children must not be regarded as having a learning difficulty solely because the language or form of language of their home is different from the language in which they will be taught.
  5. 5. Disability and special educational need Children must not be regarded as having a learning difficulty solely because the language or form of language of their home is different from the language in which they will be taught. Special educational provision means:  for children of two or over, educational provision which is additional to, or otherwise different from, the educational provision made generally for children of their age in schools maintained by the local authority, other than special schools, in the area  for children under two, educational provision of any kind.
  6. 6. The identification of special educational need The Code of Practice – statutory guidance Graduated approach to identification and provision    School action School action plus Statement of special educational need
  7. 7. The identification of special educational need  Just over one in five pupils - 1.7 million school-age children are identified as having special educational needs.  11.8% at School action  6.5% at School action plus  2.8% with Statements of special educational need  The proportion of pupils in secondary schools identified as having special educational needs without a Statement increased from 13% in 2003 to 19.7% in 2010  Approximately 100,000 pupils are in special schools (1.2%) (including independent special schools) Add presentation title to master slide | 7
  8. 8. The types of provision available in England for disabled pupils and those who have special educational needs
  9. 9.  Mainstream schools – most pupils with special educational needs attend mainstream schools alongside other pupils.  Special units attached to mainstream schools – provide more specialist help but also opportunity for integration.  Special schools – some special schools are for very specific needs, others are for pupils with a wide range of needs. Some are independent special schools.  Hospital schools – provide general education for children undergoing medical treatment, including psychiatric care  Pupil referral units – generally these are for pupils who for behavioural reasons need ‘time out’ from mainstream schools. Pupils increasingly may go to a further education college or some form of alternative provision.
  10. 10.  Residential special schools provide residential accommodation as well as education. They are mainly provided by independent organisations but pupils’ places are usually funded by their local authority.  General further education colleges – for students aged over 16, as with maintained schools most students who have learning difficulties and/or disabilities attend the same college those who do not have these additional needs.  Independent specialist colleges – for those with learning difficulties and/or disabilities who want to carry on studying after 19.
  11. 11. Ofsted inspections of schools What we focus on through school inspection and how we carry inspection out
  12. 12. The school inspection framework Overall effectiveness Four levels of performance Four key judgements 1. Outstanding Achievement 2. Good Quality of Teaching 3. Requires Improvement Behaviour and safety 4. Inadequate Leadership and management The national aim is that every school will be at least a good school
  13. 13. Latest inspection outcomes
  14. 14. Achievement of pupils at the school     The learning and progress across year groups of different groups of pupils in school Pupils’ progress over the last three years Pupils’ attainments compared with national standards Performance of key groups, especially DSEN, those entitled to the Pupil Premium, most able, EAL pupils….    By observing lessons, work scrutiny, checking school records of pupils’ progress, checking rigour of assessment, talking to pupils Proportions making and exceeding expected progress How well different groups of pupils perform as well as one another disabled pupils and those with special educational needs are a priority group
  15. 15. For those groups of pupils whose cognitive ability is such that their attainment is unlikely ever to rise above ‘low’, the judgement on achievement should be based on an evaluation of the pupils’ learning and progress relative to their starting points at particular ages, and any assessment measures held by the school. Evaluations should not take account of their attainment compared with national benchmarks
  16. 16. Aspects of outstanding achievement  From each different starting point, the proportions of pupils making expected progress and the proportions exceeding expected progress in English and in mathematics are high compared with national figures. For pupils for whom the pupil premium provides support, the proportions are similar to, or above, those for other pupils in the school or are rapidly approaching them.  Pupils make rapid and sustained progress throughout year groups across many subjects, including English and mathematics, and learn exceptionally well.  Pupils read widely, and often across all subjects to a high standard.
  17. 17. Aspects of outstanding achievement  Pupils develop and apply a wide range of skills to great effect in reading, writing, communication and mathematics. They are exceptionally well prepared for the next stage in their education, training or employment.  Pupils, including those in the sixth form and those in the Early Years Foundation Stage, acquire knowledge quickly and develop their understanding rapidly in a wide range of different subjects across the curriculum.  The learning of groups of pupils, particularly those who are disabled, those who have special educational needs, those for whom the pupil premium provides support, and the most able is consistently good or better.
  18. 18. The quality of teaching  The most important role of teaching is to promote learning and to raise pupils’ achievement.  It is also important in promoting their spiritual, moral, social and cultural development.  Teaching should be understood to include teachers’ planning and implementing of learning activities, including the setting of appropriate homework across the whole curriculum, as well as marking, assessment and feedback.  It encompasses activities within and outside the classroom, such as additional support and intervention.  Inspectors must not favour a particular or preferred approach to teaching or planning lessons.
  19. 19. The quality of teaching    Does teaching engage and include all pupils? Are pupils gaining in knowledge, skills and understanding, especially in literacy and mathematics? Do teachers monitor pupils’ progress in lessons and use the information well to adapt their teaching?    Do teachers use questioning and discussion to evaluate teaching and promote pupils’ learning? Is assessment frequent and accurate and used to set relevant work? Are pupils properly prepared for their next stage in their learning?      Inspectors must evaluate learning over time taking into account: Evidence from school leaders’ lesson observations Work scrutiny Discussion with pupils / parents The school’s own evaluation of the quality of teaching
  20. 20. Quality of teaching in the school These descriptors should not be used as a checklist. They must be applied adopting a ‘best fit’ approach which relies on the professional judgement of the inspection team. Outstanding teaching  Much of the teaching in all key stages and most subjects is outstanding and never less than consistently good. As a result, almost all pupils currently on roll in the school, including disabled pupils, those who have special educational needs, those for whom the pupil premium provides support and the most able, are making rapid and sustained progress.  All teachers have consistently high expectations of all pupils. They plan and teach lessons that enable pupils to learn exceptionally well across the curriculum.  Teachers systematically and effectively check pupils’ understanding throughout lessons, anticipating where they may need to intervene and doing so with notable impact on the quality of learning.
  21. 21. Outstanding teaching  The teaching of reading, writing, communication and mathematics is highly effective and cohesively planned and implemented across the curriculum.  Teachers and other adults authoritatively impart knowledge to ensure students are engaged in learning, and generate high levels of commitment to learning across the school.  Consistently high quality marking and constructive feedback from teachers ensure that pupils make rapid gains.  Teachers use well-judged and often imaginative teaching strategies, including setting appropriate homework that, together with clearly directed and timely support and intervention, match individual needs accurately. Consequently, pupils learn exceptionally well across the curriculum.
  22. 22. Pupils’ behaviour and safety      The extent to which pupils’ attitudes help or hinder their progress in lessons Their attitudes to school, conduct and behaviour during and outside of lessons   The school’s behaviour records and analysis of these Rates, patterns and reasons for exclusions  Pupils’ contribution and response to the culture of the school  Pupils’ respect for the school’s learning environments and resources Types, rates and patterns of bullying and the effectiveness of the school’s actions to prevent and tackle it in all its forms: to include prejudice based bullying and cyber bullying The effectiveness in preventing discriminatory and derogative language Punctuality and attendance     The school’s success in keeping pupils’ safe, within school and in external activities, through risk assessment, e-safety arrangements, action taken following any serious safeguarding incident Pupils’ ability to understand and respond to risk The effectiveness in improving behaviour and attendance The views of parents, staff and governors
  23. 23. Leadership and management  How well is a culture of high expectations fostered? Robust self-evaluation Well-focussed improvement plans Excellent policies, especially for reading, writing, mathematics Ensuring strong commitment to the vision from pupils, parents and governors  How effectiveness is the leadership of teaching and achievement? Quality of pupil progress tracking Professional development Performance management linked to salary progression The sharing of best practice identified, modelled and shared
  24. 24. Leadership and management Securing pupils’ progress in reading, writing and mathematics   To what extent does the curriculum promotes a thirst for knowledge and love of learning? How well do governors hold senior leaders to account? Its breadth & balance and if it meets pupils’ needs, interests, aptitudes Does it foster academic achievement, good behaviour, safety, physical wellbeing and SMSC Ensure strong vision, ethos, strategic direction? Do they know school performance very well and provide real challenge? Ensure pupil premium funding leads to improved achievement? Ensure school engages parents & community?
  25. 25. Leadership /management  Do safeguarding arrangements meet statutory requirements? Safe recruitment –single central record well maintained Excellent child protection policy & practice Safe practices promoted well and a culture of safety, (e-safety) Attendance well managed  Is the school moving towards system leadership? Extent to which leaders at all levels contribute towards school improvement in the local / wider area Partnership working /sharing best practice Sharing advanced skills practitioners, mentoring
  26. 26. The management of an inspection
  27. 27. The management of an inspection Her Majesty’s Inspectors (HMI) Additional Inspectors managed by Inspection Service Providers – many are current headteachers and senior school leaders. An inspection will last two days. The size of the team depends on the size and complexity of the school. For most inspections, the lead inspector will inform the school at noon on the day before the inspection starts. A few inspections are ‘no-notice’.
  28. 28. Inspectors:  spend as much time as possible in classes, observing lessons, talking to pupils about their work, gauging their understanding and engagement in what they are doing, and their perceptions of the school  hear children read in primary schools, and in Years 7 and 8 in secondary schools   scrutinise pupils’ work and look at data involve the headteacher and senior managers fully during the inspection, including during inspection team meetings.
  29. 29. The frequency of inspection depends on the judgement at its last inspection and on-going risk assessment.  Mainstream schools  Special schools  Schools that Require Improvement  Schools that are Inadequate
  30. 30. How we report our inspection findings
  31. 31. Grading of judgements Reports are short – but schools also have dialogue and feedback
  32. 32. Reports are set out to make clear how schools should seek to improve
  33. 33. Recommendations
  34. 34. Recommendations

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