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Circular Economy Task Force

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Three Task Force Papers: Key Issues & Recommendations

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Circular Economy Task Force

  1. 1. www.ieep.eu @IEEP_eu Circular Economy Task Force Three Task Force Papers: Key Issues & Recommendations Patrick ten Brink Director IEEP-Brussels & Head of the Green Economy Programme Think 20: Circular Economy Session 14:45–15:35 Auditorium 2, Floor 2 Monday 29 May 2017 Berlin
  2. 2. The Circular Economy – A Necessity and Opportunity 1. The contribution G20 governments can make to support the circular economy V Rizos, A Behrens, D Rinaldi, and E Drabik (CEPS) 2. Better Products By Design D Benton and S Wilson (Green Alliance) 3. Circular economy measures to keep plastics and their value in the economy, avoid waste and reduce marine litter P ten Brink, JP Schweitzer, Emma Watkins (IEEP), M De Smet (EMF), H Leslie (VUA), F Galgani (IFREMER), with thanks also to T Glaz (Werner Mertz) and J Blériot (HMF) Three Task Force Papers: Complementary Visions How can G20 catalyse the transition to a circular economy, using innovation to conserve resources and address environmental challenges, while realising major economic and employment opportunities?
  3. 3. The contribution G20 governments can make to support the circular economy V Rizos, A Behrens, D Rinaldi, and E Drabik (CEPS) • The G20 should collaboratively work towards agreed terminologies for products and processes relevant to the circular economy (e.g. remanufacturing, refurbishment, product life extension, reparability, reusability, etc.). • On the basis of an agreed framework of terminologies, the G20 should develop and use a common framework of indicators to monitor the performance of countries and companies worldwide. • G20 governments should use public procurement to support the demand for circular products and services, thereby taking into account the benefits occurring during the lifetime of products or services. • G20 governments should support transparency across global supply chains regarding the origins and content of circular products and materials (e.g. through supporting the development of standards and business-to-business labels).
  4. 4. Better Products By Design D Benton and S Wilson (Green Alliance) • Rising demand means that it makes economic sense to get as much value as possible out of natural resources and avoid value being lost as waste. • This also helps consumers, who at the moment often get products that don’t last as long as they should, which is a huge waste of money and resources. • The analysis of three products - smartphones, washing machines, solar panels - reveals how simple problems that frustrate consumers and waste resources could be fixed with product standards for reparability and durability. • Solutions via market rules that keep manufacturers competing over quality. • Leading economies should set ecodesign standards to deliver better products. The G20 can build on its approach to Energy Efficiency to promote resource efficiency and the circular economy, including measures to encourage better design. Proposal 1 Create a G20 dialogue on resource efficiency: Developing a G20 Resource Efficiency Action Plan Proposal 2 Promote better products by design - Including exchanges on ecodesign principles within a G20 Resource Efficiency Action Plan
  5. 5. Circular economy measures to keep plastics and their value in the economy, avoid waste & reduce marine litter P ten Brink, JP Schweitzer, Emma Watkins (IEEP), M De Smet (EMF), H Leslie (VUA), F Galgani (IFREMER), with thanks also to T Glaz (Werner Mertz) and J Blériot (HMF) • We live in the plastic age (the “plasticene”), producing over 300mt of plastic every year globally, 5-15 mt of which flow into already polluted oceans. Seven of the G20 countries were amongst the top twenty contributors to marine litter ranked by mismanaged plastic waste in 2010 (Jambeck et al., 2015). • Plastic remains a key material in the global economy, but low rates of collection, reuse and recycling, emissions of microplastic from product wear and tear, and often insufficient disposal measures are leading to far-reaching environmental, health, social and economic impacts. • The costs of inaction are unacceptably high. Globally there is a growing recognition of the need to address marine litter and rethink our approach to plastics and plastic packaging within the economy. • Measures that enable a transition to a circular economy can avoid waste & reduce marine litter, & contribute to keeping plastics & their value in the economy.
  6. 6. ECONOMY Plastic producers & converters (inc. Packaging) Sectors using plastic e.g. intermediate and final consumption Food and Drink Cosmetics and personal care products Textiles and Clothing Agriculture; Fisheries & Aquaculture Construction Terrestrial transport; Shipping Tourism SOCIETY & its INSTITUTIONS WASTE & WASTE WATER MANAGEMENT Final consumption by citizens ~300mt/yr Recyclers MARINE ENVIRONMENT TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENT Goods Services e.g. accidental releases Landfill Coast,surfacewaters,watercolumn,seabed,ingestionbyspecies Reuse, repair, remanufacture, recycle RETAIL Reuse e.g. microbeads in products; accidental releases; plastic blasting; degradation of buoys; loss of nets e.g. loss of packaging; tyre wear; accidental releases e.g. windblown waste from landfills e.g. litter washed into stormwater drains; microfibres; microbeads; bio-filters e.g. littering; deliberate/illegal waste disposal Raw material inputs: fossil fuels and agricultural material for bioplastics Plastics, the Circular Economy and Marine Litter
  7. 7. The G20 should help catalyse the move to a circular economy for plastics, to keep this material and its value in the economy, via: A. A global impetus for action on plastics and marine litter The G20 should support the implementation of existing global commitments on marine litter B. Circular economy as a framework for change across governance levels: The G20 should promote the transition to a circular economy in order to create a plastics system that works in the long term, with enhanced system effectiveness, increased resource productivity and drastically reduced marine litter. C. Developing and committing to a global roadmap for action on plastics and marine litter The G20 should advocate for a global roadmap for action to address the life cycle of plastics and effectively valorise plastics in the economy whilst mitigating their environmental impacts. D. Developing and committing to a global roadmap for action on plastics and marine litter The G20 should advocate for a global roadmap for action to address the life cycle of plastics and effectively valorise plastics in the economy whilst mitigating their environmental impacts.
  8. 8. G20 can and should catalyse the transition to a circular economy For further discussions: Patrick ten Brink, Jean-Pierre Schweitzer, and Emma Watkins of IEEP (ptenbrink@ieep.eu) Paper 3 and links of Plastic, Marine Litter and Circular Economy Solutions & for the two other Task Force Papers: Vasileios Rizos of CEPS (vasileios.rizos@ceps.eu) Paper 1 and CEPS Task Force on Circular Economy Dustin Benton and Simon Wilson of Green Alliance (SWilson@green-alliance.org.uk) Paper 2 on Product Design, and ACES: Alliance for Circular Economy solutions The costs of inaction are unacceptably high. Encouraged by the opportunities offered by circular economy measures to save resources, and concerned about the growing level of plastic in the oceans, the deterioration of water quality and impacts on biodiversity, health, society and the economy, we call on policy makers, business communities, civil society organisations, scientists and citizens to commit to concrete actions to catalyse a transition to a circular economy and address the marine litter problem. We invite them to submit an individual and joint vision for a circular economy response to marine litter, to help keep plastic and its value in the economy and out of the oceans, and hence realise ecological, social and economic benefits, while meeting our common commitment to SDG 14.1.

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