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IDTechEx Research: Printed Electronics for the Automotive Industry

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The total market for flexible and printed electronics in automotive applications is expected to reach $5.5bn by 2026, spearheaded by significant growth expected by OLED displays and lighting as well as in-mold electronics applications in the next decade. These slides from IDTechEx focus on these, along with other technologies that benefit from additive processing and flexibility in form factor and will include advances in printed sensors, haptics, thin film photovoltaics and others. Slides cover: Market forecasts for printed electronics in vehicles; Mature markets; Fast growing opportunities; Opportunities in the long term.

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IDTechEx Research: Printed Electronics for the Automotive Industry

  1. 1. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide Printed Electronics for the Automotive Industry Dr Harry Zervos, Principal Analyst, IDTechEx 3
  2. 2. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx | www.IDTechEx.com IDTechEx provides Emerging Technology insight, intelligence and networking, helping clients with their critical strategic business decisions. About IDTechEx – a snapshot view Areas of coverage: 3D Printing Advance Materials & Emerging Devices Energy Harvesting Energy Storage Electric Vehicles & Autonomous Vehicles Internet of Things and People Printed Flexible and Organic Electronics RFID Robotics Sensors Wearable Technology Global and timely analysis through: Subscriptions IDTechEx Market Intelligence Portal Weekly market, technology and company assessments Research Reports Over 70 detailed current studies Custom Consulting Projects Over 300 conducted Global Events Free Web Journals e.g. www.PrintedElectronicsWorld.com Since 1999 we have served clients in 80 countries from our bases in the US, UK, Germany and Japan
  3. 3. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide 7 IDTechEx Research www.idtechex.com/PEAuto Printed and Flexible Electronics in Automotive Applications 2016-2026: Enabling technology toolkits, suppliers and market forecasts
  4. 4. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide Different points of maturity, revenue, profitability and growth Printed, Flexible & Organic Electronics Status Source: IDTechEx report “Printed, Organic, Flexible Electronics 2015-2025” www.IDTechEx.com OLED Displays $15.3 billion Sensors $6.6 billion Conductive Ink $2.3 billion not printed printed • Organic, but not printed • Progression to flexible displays • Little focus on simple, printed OLED displays • Glucose test strips are the majority of the market (20bn units) • Rest is $83 million of different sensor types and applications • PV is main market, followed by touch panel electrodes • Overall growth 3.3% CAGR to 2020 Displays & Lighting E-paper displays (front plane) $400m AC EL displays $80m OLED Lighting $15m Electochromic displays <$2m Logic & memory $8m Power Printed/thin film batteries $5m OPV, DSSC <$1m Printed: $8.8bn (going to $14.9bn in 2025) Use flexible substrates: $6.4bn (going to $23.5bn in 2025) printed 2015 total: $24.5bn
  5. 5. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide 9 Technologies and components in automotive applications that benefit from the advent of printed/flexible electronics and already represent a market of a few hundred million dollars in 2016. Some of the technologies described are mature markets and are not expected to dramatically increase their market share or revenues (e.g. windscreen defoggers) whereas others, such as structural or in-mould electronics, are expected to grow significantly in the next decade. Finally, other technologies such as e-textiles for example, are expected to take a few more years of development before we see them rolled out into automotive applications. Structural electronics and e-textiles are aiming to replace or complement existing manufacturing paradigms and would offer benefits such as cost reduction, lighter weight, flexibility, design freedom etc. A significant opportunity, albeit not a clear market currently, exists in the space for printed sensors, when taking into account the concept of ‘the connected car”. Printed and flexible electronics in automotive applications
  6. 6. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide 10 Printed and flexible electronics in automotive applications revenues de-foggers 4% IME consoles 17% seat heaters 0% OLED lighting 6% OLED displays 70% Automotive FSR 0% TIMs 3% MARKET SHARE FOR DIFFERENT PRINTED AND ORGANIC ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGIES IN AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS IN 2026
  7. 7. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide 11 Where are conductive inks/pastes used in cars? Silver and carbon inks with positive thermal coefficient are used in seat heaters Conductive inks have traditionally been used in read window/mirror and backlight de-foggers (de- misters). They can also be used on sun-roofs.
  8. 8. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide 13 Where are conductive inks/pastes used in cars? Conductive inks are used in sensors such as airbag dispatchers. They can also be used in printing lighting elements on the dashboard. Increasingly, specialized inks are being developed so that they can be injection moulded into overhead consoles and other plastic parts in the car interiors to replace mechanical switches
  9. 9. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide 14 Companies supplying the interior of cars (e.g., see on the left) increasingly want to differentiate their products and innovate and incorporate new technologies in vehicles. In-mould electronics enables embedding electronics into 3D- shaped plastic parts - that have traditionally been fdecorative only- during the injection moulding or thermoforming steps. Such processes reduce complexity, size and weight of parts, leading to more design freedom. In-mould electronics offers a route for doing more in-house and thus keeping more of the value in-house. It also enables companies to offer more elegant solutions by replacing mechanical switches and control knobs with thin, smooth and functional surfaces. Structural or in-mould electronics Image sources: T-Ink, Tactotek
  10. 10. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide 16 Passive matrix OLED displays (PMOLED) are deployed today in car interiors in applications such as instrument clusters, car audio system displays but also in climate-control displays, rear/front-seat status indicators etc. 3.5" white PMOLED display in the 2015 Kia Soul. Where are OLED displays used in automotive applications? Active matrix OLED displays (AMOLED) are also being developed with a variety of display applications targeted, from central stacks and seatback displays to digital rear view mirrors An AMOLED digital rear view mirror in the Audi R18 racing car.
  11. 11. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide There are a huge variety of uses for thermal interface materials in the automotive industry, which include: Electric vehicle motor drives Audio systems and infotainment systems Automotive lighting Braking and steering systems Electronic control units (ECUs) Thermoelectric generators In the automotive industry, thermal greases are still predominantly used (dispensed with syringes, screen or stencil printed) as interface materials. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) attracted attention as highly thermally conductive fillers for TIMs. The attraction is their extremely high intrinsic thermal conductivity, in the range of 3000–3500 W/m.K at room temperature. Phase Change Materials (PCMs) are also now used in a wide variety of applications, but their reliability and suitability for automotive applications remains to be proven. Where are TIMs used in the automotive industry? 18
  12. 12. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide 20 Where are printed/flexible photovoltaics envisaged in cars? Flexible solar cells are ideal for coverage of 3D surfaces Renogy 100W Monocrystalline Bendable Solar Panel They are envisaged on vehicles coverings parts such as car roofs, while efforts have also been focused on developing transparent photovoltaics that could use an expanded amount of space on a vehicle (.e.g. windows). Ford C-Max Energi concept car: A collaboration with Sunpower Corporation on solar cells and Georgia Institute of Technology on the development of concentrators could allow for the equivalent of a 4-hour battery charge using solar cells alone. Traditionally, rigid crystalline solar cells have been utilized in concepts and demonstrators on car roofs, allowing for power outputs of up to 200W. Companies like Belectric are working to utilize technologies such as OPV and their benefits in versatility in form factor, semi- transparency, etc. for a range of applications. OPV powered solar trees at the German Pavillion in the 2015 Milan Expo
  13. 13. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide Many tier 1 supplier are looking at haptics integration for interiors: Automotive interest in haptics is peaking In automotive, the current efforts to introduce haptics are based around improving the user interface, specifically by introducing tactile feedback on items such as touchscreen displays or consoles on buttons in the car. This makes these components easier and safer to use, and enhances the overall user experience. Another emerging application is the introduction of haptic feedback into the steering wheel, to provide additional notifications or alerts to the driver. This is the creation of a brand new interface, intended to make the driving experience easier and safer. This application has seen only minor trials so far, and will be adopted very slowly, if at all, in the long term. Though automotive applications of haptics have been investigated for over a decade, lead times for a new technology in the automotive industry are typically 8-10 years, meaning that adoption is significantly slower than other target industries such as consumer electronics. Despite the peaking interest in automotive applications, flexible or printed haptics technologies (piezo-polymer, electroactive polumer/EAP based technologies) developed by companies such as Novasentis have yet to be implemented in this sector and are not expected to take up any market share in the next decade Prominent end users: Acura ODMD (On-Demand Multi-Use Display) Etc. 23
  14. 14. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide The idea is to make the entire design process more efficient, replacing complex post processing with a single overmoulding process to attach a full, integrated and lightweight panel. Electronic functionality would be dispersed within the textile, rather than being represented by discrete, localized components that would require additional processing steps to attach. These images show the possibilities throughout the vehicle interior, including the headliner, door panel, interior trim and dashboard options. Future directions 24 E-textiles in vehicle interiors Existing construction Demonstration of the new technique in a Rolls Royce Phantom Source: Place-IT project
  15. 15. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide 26 Discussion - Conclusions The technologies described above and the markets they enable are some of the most important sectors where printed and flexible electronics will benefit the automotive industry in the next decade. Overall the market for printed and flexible electronics is expected to reach $5.5 billion by 2026, primarily driven by the growth of structural/in-mould electronics and OLED display & lighting technologies. Technologies such as force sensing resistors, de-foggers and heated seats will either grow at a very slow rate or remain stagnant due to competitive pressures and limited demand. Others, such as photovoltaics face challenges that will delay adoption despite current research and development works Additional technologies are described below that will eventually impact the automotive sector but are currently not mature enough for adoption. Discussion – conclusions
  16. 16. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide 27 Market forecast for printed/flexible electronics in automotive applications Source: Printed and Flexible Electronics in Automotive Applications 2016-2026 Enabling technology toolkits, suppliers and market forecasts www.idtechex.com/PEAuto
  17. 17. Copyright © 2016 IDTechEx. Use in accordance with distribution licence | www.IDTechEx.com slide Supporting your strategic business decisions on emerging technologies Offices: USA (East Coast): +1 617 577 7890 Germany: +49 3991 669 3591 Korea: +82 31 263 7890 Taiwan: +886 935 553916 USA (West Coast): +1 408 217 0570 UK: +44 1223 812 300 Japan: +81 90 556 61533 www.IDTechEx.com IDTechEx conducts detailed examinations of emerging technologies, which are delivered through our Market Research Reports and Subscription services. Research Our expert analysts deliver custom projects which identify markets, appraise technologies, define growth opportunities and perform due diligence. Consulting IDTechEx conferences and tradeshows match end users with the latest innovations, providing networking, sales and knowledge sharing. Events Dr Harry Zervos – h.zervos@IDTechEx.com

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