Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Telling Our Stories IDRA at National Indian Education Association Oct 2016

Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad
Ad

Check these out next

1 of 40 Ad

Telling Our Stories IDRA at National Indian Education Association Oct 2016

Download to read offline

Telling Our Stories: Promoting Student Identity and Academic Achievement presentation by Dr. Kristin Grayson (Intercultural Development Research Association, IDRA EAC-South) and Mr. Jacob Tsotigh (South Central Comprehensive Center OU) at the National Indian Education Association conference October 2016.

Telling Our Stories: Promoting Student Identity and Academic Achievement presentation by Dr. Kristin Grayson (Intercultural Development Research Association, IDRA EAC-South) and Mr. Jacob Tsotigh (South Central Comprehensive Center OU) at the National Indian Education Association conference October 2016.

Advertisement
Advertisement

More Related Content

Viewers also liked (19)

Advertisement

Similar to Telling Our Stories IDRA at National Indian Education Association Oct 2016 (20)

More from Christie Goodman, APR (20)

Advertisement

Telling Our Stories IDRA at National Indian Education Association Oct 2016

  1. 1. Telling Our Stories: Promoting Student Identity and Academic Achievement Mr. Jacob Tsotigh South Central Comprehensive Center OU jtsotigh@ou.edu Dr. Kristin Grayson Intercultural Development Research Association, IDRA EAC-South kristin.grayson@idra.org www.idra.org October 2016
  2. 2. Objectives 1. Experience Native storytelling as a cultural component of oral tradition through the voice of the Kiowa people, authentic literature and participant stories 2. Understand culturally responsive pedagogy and techniques 3. Link Native stories to Common Core standards
  3. 3. The Power of Storytelling • We are all storytellers, especially teachers • At the heart of human experience • Our brains are wired for stories • Most powerful tool in teacher’s toolbox • Encourages students to join in repetitive phrases or refrains • Encourages students to create mental pictures
  4. 4. Storytelling • Native storytelling, is an oral tradition which passes on the collective history and culture of a group of people, cultural values and mores • Storytelling is a shared social experience which provokes a response of laughter, sadness, empathy, excitement and anticipation that encourages social and emotional development.
  5. 5. Tribal Nations Peoples Culture Governance Land Culture: traditions, new and old, sustain societies, language, families, art and lifeways (NCAI)
  6. 6. Culture
  7. 7. Some, depending on their cultural perspective, might see this as a man with a gun, or a woman listening in to a group of men having a conversation for men, or perhaps it is a group gathered for a funeral with the remains of the deceased in the box. Depending upon our cultural perspective, we may think and behave differently or interpret the behavior and thoughts of other through the lens of our own culture. Geert Hofstede has identified five dimensions of national cultures. See if you can identify them through the representations that follow. The colors represent the varying lenses through which culture changes our perceptions.
  8. 8. 5 Dimensions of Culture
  9. 9. Traditional gender roles where men are to be tough and assertive and not emotional vs. a culture where gender roles overlap and both men and women are concerned for relationships, caring, and quality of life.
  10. 10. South Central Collaborative for Equity
  11. 11. In individualistic cultures people tend to look after just themselves and/or immediate families vs. societies where people are in strong cohesive groups with life-long loyalties. Individualistic - Collectivistic
  12. 12. 5 Dimensions of Culture Individualistic - Collectivistic
  13. 13. Power Distance
  14. 14. How much people accept inequality in the distribution of power. Power Distance
  15. 15. 5 Dimensions of Culture Individualistic - Collectivistic Power Distance
  16. 16. Time Orientation
  17. 17. Time Orientation Short term: tradition, saving face, past and present vs. future and perseverance, thrift
  18. 18. 5 Dimensions of Culture Individualistic - Collectivistic Power Distance Time Orientation
  19. 19. Uncertainty Avoidance
  20. 20. The degree to which ambiguity is tolerated as opposed to rigid set of rules and procedures Uncertainty Avoidance
  21. 21. 5 Dimensions of Culture Individualistic - Collectivistic Power Distance Time Orientation Uncertainty Avoidance
  22. 22. Indulgence vs. Restraint #6 Indulgence stands for a society that allows relatively free gratification of basic and natural human drives related to enjoying life and having fun. Restraint stands for a society that suppresses gratification of needs and regulates it by means of strict social norms.
  23. 23. Professor Geert Hofstede https://geert-hofstede.com/united-states.html
  24. 24. With storytelling, teachers can… Engage students Emotions that evoke culture Associations with student-group identity Reasoning Critical thinking
  25. 25. Culturally Responsive Teaching 1. Positive perspectives on parents and families 2. Communication of high expectations 3. Learning within the context of culture 4. Student-centered instruction 5. Culturally-mediated instruction 6. Reshaping the curriculum 7. Teacher as a facilitator Include students’ cultural references in all aspects of learning. (Ladson & Billings, 1994)
  26. 26. How to: Culturally Responsive Teaching • Get to know students and families (notes and name cards) • Understand parents’ hopes and concerns (through individual and group drawings) • Set high expectations by respect and value, clear objectives and lesson engagement • Within cultural context - by adapting learning styles in the classrooms that aligned with students’ culture (group vs. individual work)
  27. 27. Other • Student ancestry • Connect tribes with geography and history • Movement • Language • Student names and cultural meanings • Promote and inspire a positive self-image through focus on culture
  28. 28. The Heart of Common Core “At the core of culturally-responsive pedagogy is the idea that education must account for the lived experiences and cultural reference points of students. Culturally-responsive teachers craft the education their particular students deserve – one that acknowledges their voice, validates their concerns and connects to their experiences. In the literacy context, this can mean giving students things to read that are by or about people with whom they can relate and allowing students to write on topics they care about. No text is neutral. There is always voice. When planning literacy instruction, we place our students into a dialogue with the authors and texts we assign. The more text-to-self and text-to- world connections a student can make, the more equitable and powerful the dialogue will be.” – Emily Chiariello, Teaching Tolerance
  29. 29. Storytelling and Common Core: Reading Standards Literature K-5 3 4 5 Recount stories, including fables, folktales, and myths from diverse cultures; determine the central message, lesson, or moral and explain how it is conveyed through key details in the text. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text, including how characters in a story or drama respond to challenges or how the speaker in a poem reflects upon a topic; summarize the text
  30. 30. College and Career Readiness: Writing Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.
  31. 31. Literacy in Social Studies 6-8 9-10 11-12 Integrate visual information (e.g., in charts, graphs, photographs, videos, or maps) with other information in print and digital texts. Integrate quantitative or technical analysis (e.g., charts, research data) with qualitative analysis in print or digital text. Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media (e.g., visually, quantitatively, as well as in words) in order to address a question or solve a problem.
  32. 32. OralTradition of Storytellingis Cultural • To relate history • To teach lessons of values and mores • Can vary by the narrator, the setting, and the audience for which it was told, uses repetition - loses something when written • Themes also emerge among different tribal groups and their stories • What about yours? Such as tricksters, earth, • Can be similar stories for the same theme- such as creation stories
  33. 33. Share your stories
  34. 34. Intercultural Development Research Association Dr. María “Cuca” Robledo Montecel, President & CEO 5815 Callaghan Road, Suite 101 San Antonio, Texas 78228 210-444-1710 • contact@idra.org www.idra.org Our mission is to achieve equal educational opportunity for every child through strong public schools that prepare all students to access and succeed in college. Subscribe to get IDRA news

×