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How’s a Picture Worth 1,000
Words in Math and Science?
Paula Martin Johnson, M.A.
Education Associate paula.johnson@idra.o...
Talk About It
Discuss with someone…
What do you see?
In a minute, but not yet…
Physically turn to your partner and discuss
the following question.
How has the evolution of thi...
Observe and Report
At your table, discuss some noteworthy aspects of
any similarities and differences that you noticed
bet...
Rules of Engagement
Face your partner(s)
Use eye contact
Listen attentively
Disagree politely
Share connections
Expr...
Session Objectives
Today’s session will demonstrate strategies for
increasing student engagement through the
integrated us...
Turn and Talk
Purpose: Use physical position to facilitate
academic collaboration among
students.
Length: Varies according...
Turn and Talk: Reflection
How does establishing rules for engagement
encourage on-task behaviors?
How does this strategy...
Types of Turn and Talk
Think-Pair-Share
Round Table Discussion
Round Robin
Meaningful Mingle
Chat n Check
Talk to your neighbor about …
0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25
HeightofPlants
Plant Number
Water
Mira...
Visual Literacy
Visual representations of text help a reader see
the information again.
A graphic “re-presentation” allows...
Create Meaning with Visuals
 Interactive Notebooks
 Graphs, charts, diagrams, photos
 Graphic Organizers
 Folding Orga...
Pictorial Representations, Charts
and Graphs
Visual Literacy
Visual information absorbed while simultaneously
listening can improve understanding of spoken
words by as...
Advance Organizers
An advance organizer is information presented by an
instructor that helps the student organize new
inc...
Advance Organizers
Advance organizers make it easier to learn new material of a
complex or otherwise difficult nature, pro...
Advance Organizer Examples
Advance Organizer Example
Graphic Organizers
Graphic organizers are illustrations used to organize and
highlight key content information and vocabul...
Venn Diagrams
My Definition Characteristics
& Attributes
Example Non-Examples
Vocabulary Term
Frayer Model
Filmstrip
Attribute Chart
Check
your answer solution
Attribute Chart

Word or Concept Map
Word or Concept Map
What is it?
What is it like?
What are some Examples?
two expressions
of equal value
state of being
the...
Your Turn!
the ability to interpret, negotiate, and make meaning from
information presented in the form of an image
Graphi...
Word or
Phrase
Greater
Than
Memories & Movement
Sound Meaning“Raise the Roof…” Used to express a larger value;
upwards; ab...
Building Vocabulary
Good Better Best!
Higher Order Thinking Skills
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy &
Critical Questioning
… can the student recall or remember the info...
Great Expectations?
Think of a question that you would pose to your
students… write the question on the handout.
Now revie...
Q-Chart:
Higher Order Questioning
Is Did Can Would Will Might
What
Where
When
Which
How
Why
Raising the Bar:
Setting High(er) Expectations
Reframe the question to offer a higher level of cognitive
thinking for the...
Newsflash!
 Imagine if you will that you are on the local evening
news team.
 This just in… (see your card) has been spo...
Reflection
The purpose of today’s session was demonstrating
strategies for increasing student engagement through
the integ...
Recap: Newsflash!
 Imagine if you will that you are on the local evening news team.
 This just in… (blank) have been spo...
Substantive Conversation
In classes with substantive conversation there is
considerable teacher-student and student-studen...
Input vs. Output
Visual Thinking
Visual Learning
Visual Communication
Visual
Literacy
Decoding (Receiving)
Seeing, identif...
Graphic Organizers
 Choose content that is difficult for students to organize or is
poorly organized
 Develop an outline...
Intercultural Development Research
Association
Dr. María “Cuca” Robledo Montecel, President & CEO
5815 Callaghan Road, Sui...
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How’s a picture worth 1,000 words in math and science

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In most classrooms, the days of memorization-focused teaching are gone. Though, we are still in the midst of a transition to building students’ critical thinking skills. Critical thinking leads students to understand and apply information instead of just remembering facts. Paula Johnson, M.A., an IDRA education associate, describes how teachers can foster critical thinking through the integrated use of: substantive student conversations, visual literacy and higher-order questioning. She also gives examples of how teachers can lead structured and unstructured conversations and how to use graphic organizers and foldables to draw more out of students so that they learn to apply what they are learning to their lives.

Also see the IDRA Classnotes Podcast about this presentation at http://www.idra.org/Podcasts/

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How’s a picture worth 1,000 words in math and science

  1. 1. How’s a Picture Worth 1,000 Words in Math and Science? Paula Martin Johnson, M.A. Education Associate paula.johnson@idra.org Intercultural Development Research Association
  2. 2. Talk About It Discuss with someone… What do you see?
  3. 3. In a minute, but not yet… Physically turn to your partner and discuss the following question. How has the evolution of this utensil affected humanity?
  4. 4. Observe and Report At your table, discuss some noteworthy aspects of any similarities and differences that you noticed between the two conversations. Select a member to share your observations regarding the activity.
  5. 5. Rules of Engagement Face your partner(s) Use eye contact Listen attentively Disagree politely Share connections Express reactions/emotions Ask follow-up questions
  6. 6. Session Objectives Today’s session will demonstrate strategies for increasing student engagement through the integrated use of: Substantive Student Conversations Visual Literacy Higher-Order Questioning
  7. 7. Turn and Talk Purpose: Use physical position to facilitate academic collaboration among students. Length: Varies according to task
  8. 8. Turn and Talk: Reflection How does establishing rules for engagement encourage on-task behaviors? How does this strategy help students become better at expressing their understanding?
  9. 9. Types of Turn and Talk Think-Pair-Share Round Table Discussion Round Robin Meaningful Mingle Chat n Check
  10. 10. Talk to your neighbor about … 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 HeightofPlants Plant Number Water Miracle Gro Peters Spectrum Osmocote Fertilizer Comparison Chart
  11. 11. Visual Literacy Visual representations of text help a reader see the information again. A graphic “re-presentation” allows readers to see relationships, understand organization, connect ideas, and make abstract ideas concrete.
  12. 12. Create Meaning with Visuals  Interactive Notebooks  Graphs, charts, diagrams, photos  Graphic Organizers  Folding Organizers
  13. 13. Pictorial Representations, Charts and Graphs
  14. 14. Visual Literacy Visual information absorbed while simultaneously listening can improve understanding of spoken words by as much as six fold. (Science Daily, 2009)
  15. 15. Advance Organizers An advance organizer is information presented by an instructor that helps the student organize new incoming information. This is achieved by directing attention to what is important in the coming material, highlighting relationships, and providing a reminder about relevant prior knowledge.
  16. 16. Advance Organizers Advance organizers make it easier to learn new material of a complex or otherwise difficult nature, provided the following two conditions are met: 1. The student must process and understand the information presented in the organizer—this increases the effectiveness of the organizer itself. 2. The organizer must indicate the relationship among the basic concepts and terms that will be used.
  17. 17. Advance Organizer Examples
  18. 18. Advance Organizer Example
  19. 19. Graphic Organizers Graphic organizers are illustrations used to organize and highlight key content information and vocabulary Critical elements:  Teacher provides direct instruction on how to develop various graphic organizers  Organizers are student created
  20. 20. Venn Diagrams
  21. 21. My Definition Characteristics & Attributes Example Non-Examples Vocabulary Term Frayer Model
  22. 22. Filmstrip
  23. 23. Attribute Chart
  24. 24. Check your answer solution Attribute Chart 
  25. 25. Word or Concept Map
  26. 26. Word or Concept Map What is it? What is it like? What are some Examples? two expressions of equal value state of being the same x + 7 = -4 3x-2=x+10 Balance of things Equation 10+7-5=17-5
  27. 27. Your Turn! the ability to interpret, negotiate, and make meaning from information presented in the form of an image Graphic Organizers Interpreting Graphs Organizing Data Hands-On Activities
  28. 28. Word or Phrase Greater Than Memories & Movement Sound Meaning“Raise the Roof…” Used to express a larger value; upwards; above Vocabulary Instruction through Total Physical Response
  29. 29. Building Vocabulary Good Better Best!
  30. 30. Higher Order Thinking Skills Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy & Critical Questioning … can the student recall or remember the information? … can the student explain ideas or concepts? … can the student use the information in a new way? … can the student distinguish between the different parts? … can the student justify a stand or decision? … can the student create new product or point of view?
  31. 31. Great Expectations? Think of a question that you would pose to your students… write the question on the handout. Now review the Q-Chart and Critical Thinking Question Stems. Where would the question fall in terms of complexity and higher order thinking skills?
  32. 32. Q-Chart: Higher Order Questioning Is Did Can Would Will Might What Where When Which How Why
  33. 33. Raising the Bar: Setting High(er) Expectations Reframe the question to offer a higher level of cognitive thinking for the student. When could this type of questioning be used to cognitively challenge students? Be prepared to share.
  34. 34. Newsflash!  Imagine if you will that you are on the local evening news team.  This just in… (see your card) has been spotted in a classroom.  You have only 1 minute before your anchor (speaker for the group) goes on the air.  Viewer’s have lost sound. Design a broadcast using only visuals that you can successfully share with them in under one minute to convey important information about your topic?
  35. 35. Reflection The purpose of today’s session was demonstrating strategies for increasing student engagement through the integrated use of:  Substantive Student Discourse  Visual Literacy  Higher-Order Questioning
  36. 36. Recap: Newsflash!  Imagine if you will that you are on the local evening news team.  This just in… (blank) have been spotted in a classroom.  You have only 1 minute before your anchor (speaker for the group) goes on the air.  Oh no!! Viewer’s have lost sound. What information can you share with them in under one minute in order for them to be successful using only visuals?
  37. 37. Substantive Conversation In classes with substantive conversation there is considerable teacher-student and student-student interaction about the ideas of a substantive topic. The interaction should be reciprocal, utilize probing questions, and promote coherent shared understanding.
  38. 38. Input vs. Output Visual Thinking Visual Learning Visual Communication Visual Literacy Decoding (Receiving) Seeing, identifying, and deconstructing images for meaning Encoding (Producing) Putting ideas together to create a visual representation of understanding
  39. 39. Graphic Organizers  Choose content that is difficult for students to organize or is poorly organized  Develop an outline for the key ideas/concepts in the target information  Select an appropriate format  Construct both a completed teacher version and an incomplete copy of the student version to use during instruction
  40. 40. Intercultural Development Research Association Dr. María “Cuca” Robledo Montecel, President & CEO 5815 Callaghan Road, Suite 101 San Antonio, Texas 78228 210-444-1710 • contact@idra.org www.idra.org Assuring educational opportunity for every child @IDRAedu www.linkedin.com/company/ interculturaldevelopment- researchassociation facebook.com/IDRAed pinterest.com/idraedu www.slideshare.net/ IDRAedu flickr.com/ photos/idraedu Sign up to receive IDRA news by email at www.idra.org/Receive_IDRA_News

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