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Communicating in an Emergency 
Use social media to follow federal/local 
entities for emergency or alert service 
infor...
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Communicating in an Emergency: National Preparedness & Disaster Recovery Planning Infographic

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So many questions arise when a disaster strikes. Consider these dos and don'ts for communicating before, during, and after a disaster.

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  • Don't depend on a cell phone. After Irma we had no ability to call or text for four (4) days. If we had needed police or fire the only way we had to contact them was with the marine radio on the boat via the Coast Guard.
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Communicating in an Emergency: National Preparedness & Disaster Recovery Planning Infographic

  1. 1. @ Communicating in an Emergency Use social media to follow federal/local entities for emergency or alert service information Make sure all electronic devices are kept charged with easy-to-nd, back-up batteries, and chargers. Program a list of emergency numbers into your phone. Make sure everyone in your family knows how to text and has everyone’s phone numbers. Forward your home phone to your wireless phone if you have to evacuate. Keep phones, tablets, laptops, batteries, chargers, etc. in a dry accessible location. Are my loved ones safe? Use a corded phone plugged directly into a wall jack to place calls if the power goes out. Use 911 for emergency phone calls only. Store non-emergency or information lines, such as 311. Sources: safeandwell.communityos.org hurricanesafety.org/prepare/social-media-and-disaster-preparedness/ verizonwireless.com/news/article/2012/09/wireless-devices-disaster-preparedness.html newscenter2.verizon.com/press-releases/verizon/2012/consumer-emergency-preparedness.html fcc.gov/blog/fcc-and-fema-how-communicate-during-and-after-major-disaster fcc.gov/guides/emergency-communications fcc.gov/emergency-communications-tips ready.gov/family-communications Communications During a Disaster: Five Lessons Learned, Posted Nov 6 2012 by Communications Network Expect your answering machine to work if there is no power. Make non-emergency calls or drain devices by playing games, watching videos, etc. Rely on cordless phones, VoIP phone lines, or phone services that are routed through a modem and provided by a cable provider. Try to text or send pictures to 911. Have at least one cloud-based (e.g., Google) email account. Check social media regularly for updates, warnings, and to post your status information. Automatically assume that losing power means losing online access. Try WiFi access. Let your car run out of gas. You may need a car charger to keep electronics powered up. Forget to store an ICE (In Case of Emergency) number. Wait until an emergency to create an emergency call plan. Rely on locally-hosted or employer email addresses. Repeatedly try to contact the same phone number—wait 10 seconds between attempts or text. Use texting, emailing, and social media to reach friends and loved ones. Use the American Red Cross’s Safe Well program to communicate your status and search for others. Make long phone calls—try to convey only vital information. Forget to check resources available from organizations like the Red Cross, FEMA, DHS. ü O ü O ü O ü O ü O ü O ü O ü O ü O ü O ü O ü O How can I tell my friends and family I’m okay? So many questions arise when a disaster strikes. As we increasingly rely on new technology and instant access to online information, we need to protect our ability to use electronic devices in an emergency. Consider these dos and don’ts for communicating before, during, and after a disaster: DO DON’T What do I need to know? connect with us icfi.com

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