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Promoting Climate Resilient Rural Infrastructure in Northern Vietnam: Final Workshop - Introduction and Overview of the Project

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The ADB Capacity Development Technical Assistance project Promoting Climate Resilient Rural Infrastructure in Northern Vietnam is demonstrating how non-conventional engineering solutions can strengthen rural infrastructure, resisting the hazards associated with climate change and providing opportunities to enhance community livelihoods. The project focuses on bioengineering as a low-cost alternative to conventional slope stabilization and protection techniques

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Promoting Climate Resilient Rural Infrastructure in Northern Vietnam: Final Workshop - Introduction and Overview of the Project

  1. 1. Promoting Climate Resilient Rural Infrastructure in Northern Vietnam TA 8102-VIE Final Workshop Introduction and Overview of the Project Dr J R Cook
  2. 2. WORKSHOP – A Final Review• Introduction • Project Context • Project Overview
  3. 3. Workshop Aims The aim of this additional workshop is to wrap- up the TA 8102 project with an overview of the technical outputs and to review what the options and recommendations are for taking forward this important initiative.
  4. 4. Workshop Sessions 0830-1000hrs Introduction Coffee/Tea 1015-1200hrs Review of Demonstration Sites Lunch 1330-1730hrs Review of Outputs & Way Forward (1500-1530 Coffee/Tea) 1930hrs Workshop Dinner
  5. 5. The current climatic environment, with its variability and frequency of extreme weather events, makes Vietnam highly susceptible to climate impacts. The risks arising from these impacts are considerably increased when the likelihood of increasing climate threats from future climate change is taken into account. Background
  6. 6. Background Page 6 Climate impacts are already a concern for Vietnam and these are predicted to intensify in the decades to come, threatening sustainable rural development and security of the region.
  7. 7. Climate Impact
  8. 8. Commune bridge March 2013 Commune bridge May 2013 Climate impacts range in scale from small…
  9. 9. Page 9 … to large.
  10. 10. A Key Challenge Large Scale Climate Science Local Climate Resilience Practical Down-scaling Appropriate Adaptation ?
  11. 11. Climate Impacts Adaptation Options Risk Priority Judgement The Difficult Bit Climate Threats Asset Vulnerability
  12. 12. Current standard engineering Approaches Are there more cost- effective ways forward?
  13. 13. Rural road Bioengineering and combined bioengineering and geotechnical options Potentially more cost- effective
  14. 14. Project Introduction The Objective of the overall project is “to increase the resilience and reduce vulnerability of local, critical economic infrastructure in the northern mountain areas of Vietnam to the adverse impacts of climate change and to create a policy framework conducive to promoting resilient northern mountains zone development”.
  15. 15. Overall Project: Five Components Components 1, 2, 4 and 5 are being undertaken separately from component 3 with funding administered by UNDP. Only component 3 is administered by ADB through this TA 8102-VIE.
  16. 16. The Five Components • Component 1: Mainstreaming of climate risk reduction into policy formulation and infrastructure development planning. • Component 2: Capacity development, primarily at the provincial level in the Northern Mountains, to increase understanding about current and emerging climate risks and to promote the use of climate resilience techniques during local planning activities. • Component 3: A meaningful demonstration of low cost, easily implementable measures to reduce the vulnerability of rural infrastructure to extreme climate events using infrastructure to be improved under SRIDP. • Component 4: The dissemination of lessons learned and best practices. • Component 5: Project management.
  17. 17. Three Key Outputs Output 1 Climate change threats and impacts assessed and adaptation options identified. Output 2 Concept and detailed designs developed, communities engaged, and demonstration adaptation activities implemented. Output 3 Strengthened capacity of project stakeholders to assess climate change impacts and select, design and implement bioengineered solutions.
  18. 18. Delivery The delivery of these outputs has been centred around demonstrating a logical process of assessment, design, construction and monitoring of cost-effective climate resilient bioengineering focussed works at 5 locations in 4 sites in three provinces.
  19. 19. A Logical Way Forward 1. Impact assessment •Assessing the impact of climate threats on infrastructure, 2. Adaptation planning •Defining adaptation priorities and plans for the most vulnerable assets 3. Adaptation implementation •Implementing the adaptation measures and adjusting over time based on experience and new information
  20. 20. Adaptation planning 1.Reviewthemost vulnerableassets 2.Lookngbackto definetheimpacts whichrequire adaptationresponses 3.Definingthe adaptationoptions 4.Settingprioritities amongoptions 5.Integrating adaptationpriorities 6.Building adaptationpackages intoplansand projects To identify (i) the assets which have been assessed as most vulnerable in the CAM VA process and (ii) the threats to which those assets are most vulnerable For the most vulnerable assets - identify the most significant impacts which will require adaptation responses For each vulnerable assets define a range of adaptation options for the species group, habitats, ecosystems which address the most significant impacts Defining which options (i) are most important, (ii) have the greatest chances of success, (iii) are feasible, (iv) do not have negative effects on other sectors or other adaptations (now or in future). Also, identifying the order of adaptation and needed phasing – or what needs to be done now and what can be left to later Identifying synergies and needed linkages between adaptation priorities. For each priority define key activities Integrate priorities as adaptation packages or projects Prepare strategy for “mainstreaming” into development plans and policies. Preparing Design Management Frameworks for each priority 1. Defining adaptation options which address the impacts 2. Selecting priorities for adaptation 3. Develop adaptation project concepts and plans
  21. 21. Demonstration Sites
  22. 22. Output 1: Assessment
  23. 23. METHODOLOGY FOR QUANTIFIED CLIMATE CHANGE Quantify the amount of rainfall accumulated during historic events Compare the historic 1-day rainfall return periods with the known major land slide/ flash flood events Quantify the amount of rainfall accumulated during future events with climate change Compare the future CC 1-day rainfall return periods with known major land slide events calculate the impact of climate change on rainfall return periods calculate the impact of climate change on design flow Calculate catchment characteristics Estimate design flow using empirical formula
  24. 24. Huoi Ca stream - Area= 31,445 km2 Nam Mau stream - Area= 4,800 km2 Huoi Ang stream - Area= 1,368 km2 Nam Lap stream - Area= 4,243 km2 TYPICAL RESULTS Calculate catchment area
  25. 25. Impact AdaptiveCapacity Very Low Inconvenience (days) Low Short disruption to system function (weeks) Medium Medium term disruption to system function (months) High Long term damage to system property or function (years) Very High Loss of life, livelihood or system integrity Very Low Very limited institutional capacity and no access to technical or financial resources Medium Medium High Very High Very High Low Limited institutional capacity and limited access to technical and financial resources Low Medium Medium High Very High Medium Growing institutional capacity and access to technical or financial resources Low Medium Medium High Very High High Sound institutional capacity and good access to technical and financial resources Low Low Medium Medium High Very High Exceptional institutional capacity and abundant access to technical and financial resources Very Low Low Low Medium High VULNERABILITY = Impact x Adaptive Capacity 25 Determining Vulnerability
  26. 26. 26 Baseline data on road assets Identification of climate-impact hazards and key vulnerable spots
  27. 27. Collection of asset data in numerical format facilitates easier analysis 26. Failure 0 0 0 0 0 0 25. Nat Slope Condition 1 1 1 1 1 1 24. Nat slope vegetation 1 1 1 1 1 1 23. Nat slope-Angle 3 3 3 3 3 3 22. Nat slope-L 3 3 3 3 3 3 21. Ework Vegetation 5 5 5 5 5 5 20. Ework-Condition 1 1 1 1 1 1 19. Ework Material 4 4 4 4 4 4 18. Ework-H 3 3 3 3 3 3 17. Ework-A 3 3 3 3 3 3 16. Ework-T 1 1 1 1 1 1 15. Water Channel 0 0 0 0 0 0 Notes 12. Ditch 4 4 4 4 4 4 13. Road Width (m) 4.5m 4m 4.5m 4m 5m 4.5m 14. Access Condition 0 0 0 0 0 0 Mark Km0 + 000 Km0 + 100 Km0 + 200 Km0 + 300 Km0 + 400 Km0 + 500 ID in map 1 2 3 4 5 6 9. Chainage 0 100 200 300 400 500 10. Structure 0 0 0 0 0 0 11. Cross-section 8 8 8 8 8 8 12. Ditch 4 4 4 4 4 4
  28. 28. Page 28 15. Water Channel 20. Earthwork Condition 25. Natural Slope Condition 0 None 1 Gully/dry watercourse 0 No issues 0 No issues 1 Pipe culvert 2 Unlined stream 1 Minor surface erosion 1 Minor erosion 2 Box culvert 3 Lined ditch/stream 2 Minor slopeface failure 2 Minor surafce failures 3 Bridge 4 river 3 Severe gulleying 3 Significant Upslope Instability 4 Retaining wall 4 Moderate slope failure 4 Significant Downslope Instability 5 Major slope failure 5 Instability across alignment 16. Earthwork Type 11. Cross-section 1 Cut 21. Vegetation 26. Slope failure 2 Embankment 1 Bio-engineered slope 3 Dumped spoil 2 Mature trees/shrub/grass 3 Grass/shrubs 4 Sparse Grass/shrubs 5 Essentially none 17. Earthwork Angle 0 0 22. Natural Slope Length 1 1-10 1 <5m 2 10-20 2 5-20m 3 20-45 3 20-100m 4 45-75 4 100-500m 5 >75 5 >500m 12. Ditch 18. Earthwork Height 23. Natural Slope Angle Notes legend 0 Not required 0 0 0 0 1 Effective 1 0-3m 1 1-10 Buildings 2 Partially Blocked 2 3-6m 2 10-20 3 Blocked 3 6-12m 3 20-45 Bridge 4 Missing 4 12-25m 4 45-75 5 >25m 5 >75 C--------------C Culvert Road 14. Access Condition 19. Earthwork material 24. Natural Vegetation Ditch 1 No issues 1 Silty clay 0 0 S--------------S Stream 2 <10% access affected 2 Silt 1 Mature trees/shrub/grass R--------------R River 3 10-25% access affected 3 Clay 2 Grass 4 25-50% access affected 4 3 Dry cultivation 5 >50% access affected 4 Sparse Grass 5 Irrigated cultivation 10. Structure 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
  29. 29. Options Selected Option Bac Kan (R) Thai Nguyen (C) Thai Nguyen (E) Son La (R) Son La (C) 1.1 Vetiver grass √ √ √ √ √ 1.2 Short local grass √ √ 1.3 Grass seed/mulch/jute √ 1.4 Brush layers √ √ √ √ 1.5 Palisades √ √ 1.6 Live fences √ √ √ 1.7 Fascines √ √ 1.8 Live poles √ √ 1.9 Vegetated check dams √ 1.10 Truncheon cuttings line √ 2.1 Vegetated Rip rap √ 2.2 Vegetated gabions 2.3 Concrete frame + grass √ 3.1 Concrete frame + stone √ 3.2 Mortared stone drain √ √ √ 3.3 Gabions (cascade) √ √ √ 3.4 Gabion mattress √
  30. 30. Output 2: Design and Implementation
  31. 31. Son La River
  32. 32. Thai Nguyen -1
  33. 33. Thai Nguyen 1
  34. 34. Thai Nguyen - 2
  35. 35. Thai Nguyen -2
  36. 36. Son La Slope
  37. 37. Son La Slope
  38. 38. Output 3: Monitoring Evidence
  39. 39. Output 3: Monitoring Evidence 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 4.5 5 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 CoverQuality Monitoring Months Plant Cover K2 K4 K6 K8
  40. 40. Output 3: Key Technical Outputs • TR-14: Effectiveness Audit Report • TR-15: Training Completion Report • TR-16: Construction Completion Report • TR-17: Technical Guidelines for Slope Protection • TR-18: Sample Drawings and Specifications • TR-19: Low-cost Slope Protection: Training Course Content
  41. 41. THANK YOU!

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