ICCA University Research Projects #ICCA12 MONDAY 22/10/2012

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Presentation held at the 51st ICCA Congress which took place in San Juan, Puerto Rico from 20 - 24 October 2012. For more information on ICCA please visit www.iccaworld.com.

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  • Looking over a wider areas of our research we can say that we have a long history not only in providing events education (the longest history in providing higher education degrees in Australia within the undergraduate Bachelor of Business program, and since then with the Masters of Business program, MBA and a great PhD students). Over the past 10 years many of the event team are associates of – and contribute to the research projects that the Centre for Tourism and Services Research (CTSR Centre for Tourism and Services Research) has been employed to conduct. In respect of the totality of Australian business events (of all types), this has included: - the benchmark National Business Events Study (2005) for Sustainable Tourism CRC (STCRC) - business event evaluation for United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) - annual benchmarking studies for the Association of Australian Convention Bureaux . - In partnership with Arts Victoria, the CTSR developed the 'Encore' software. This allows convention centres and hotels to benchmark their business event performance, enabling accurate assessment of the sector ’ s economic contribution. My own role in Meetings and Conferences started before my academic one. As first conference and training session organiser for a well known car manufacturer (in 1990) to post graduate study, then work as researcher in economic development brought me to my first position as a university lecturer via my organisation of an international conference for a university in 1995. I have continued to be involved in education for and managing events (albeit a lot less frequently) ever since. My reason for moving to Melbourne, Australia, from a very agreeable life in Edinburgh, Scotland, was not the promise of beaches, surfing or sport of associate with Australia. No it was well recorded history of excellent in event education and research at Victoria University – and the knowledge that Melbourne is an excellent host of events of all types.
  • The rationale for establishing Ambassador Programmes is to bid for regularly occurring, roaming international association meetings and conventions take place across the globe. Ambassadors put forward proposals or invitations either as individuals or as part of an informal bidding group. Because of their status, input from these ‘ local ’ leaders has an impact on the decision making about where an international meeting will take place. At the very least, the absence of local support may be a key factor contributing to an unsuccessful bid. Many cities around the world, and a number of national destination marketing organisations and congress centres, attempt to proactively manage local input into the bidding process by setting up Ambassador Programmes. These programmes have developed to suit local financial, political and economic conditions. Some programmes involve intensive relationships with small numbers of ambassadors; whilst others undertake a dedicated team approach managing relationships and activities with 1,000 plus contacts via sophisticated direct marketing methods.  
  • Getz (2003) noted the critical success factors for winning bids Having strong partners in the bidding process Make excellent presentations to decision makers Treat every bid as a unique process Promote the track record of the community in hosting events Assist other organisations to make better bids ICCA guide goes into: The value of ambassador programs Strategic considerations e.g. long-term commitment, alignment of objectives Who to select as an ambassador? Key components of an ambassador program Practical support for ambassadors Stages in the bidding process
  • Cost and time constraints dictated an online survey method Programs offered a mix of new and established programs; small (20) and medium sized (120) programs ICCA facilitated access to ambassador program organisers, organisers sent the link to the online survey to ambassadors for them to complete Reminders were sent to boost the response rate Data analysed using IBM Statistics (SPSS) v. 19
  • 37% of respondents aged 50-59 years (most common response), a further 42.6% of respondents were aged between 30-49 years of age.
  • - Relative to total number of ambassadors in each program, Sawarak is over-represented in the results. Response rates per program: Club Melbourne (22 out of 148 = 15%) Al Safeer (19/120 = 16%) Sarawak (13/20 = 65%)
  • Preliminary observations The professional bodies that ambassadors belong to are important in their decision to participate in the event bidding process 56% of total respondents were members of a national based professional association 69% of total respondents were members of an international professional association More personal motives for bidding do not appear until lower down the list (Rank 5) It is not surprising that career benefits rate so lowly given ambassadors are often at the top of their profession, invited to become members of these programs because of their recognised reputation and networks in a particular field. More surprising is the low rank afforded social benefits. As the ICCA Ambassador Programme guide notes, ‘dinners, concerts, award presentations’ are tools to recognise and reward ambassadors – perhaps other means of reward could replace these social functions.
  • Once again professional networks are important
  • Broad support from ambassadors for the role their programs play in attracting international meetings/events (though the may be some inherent bias in this finding). These items were answered by all respondents including those who’d not had any involvement in an event bid in the previous two years. Therefore it is not surprising that the ratings for the first two items are lower but overall still in general agreement.
  • Looking over a wider areas of our research we can say that we have a long history not only in providing events education (the longest history in providing higher education degrees in Australia within the undergraduate Bachelor of Business program, and since then with the Masters of Business program, MBA and a great PhD students). Over the past 10 years many of the event team are associates of – and contribute to the research projects that the Centre for Tourism and Services Research (CTSR Centre for Tourism and Services Research) has been employed to conduct. In respect of the totality of Australian business events (of all types), this has included: - the benchmark National Business Events Study (2005) for Sustainable Tourism CRC (STCRC) - business event evaluation for United Nations World Tourism Organisation (UNWTO) - annual benchmarking studies for the Association of Australian Convention Bureaux . - In partnership with Arts Victoria, the CTSR developed the 'Encore' software. This allows convention centres and hotels to benchmark their business event performance, enabling accurate assessment of the sector ’ s economic contribution.
  • ICCA University Research Projects #ICCA12 MONDAY 22/10/2012

    1. 1. 51st ICCA Congress ICCA University research projects Monday, 22 October 2012International Congress and Convention Association. Session sponsored by:Twitter: #ICCA12
    2. 2. Speakers• Martin Robertson, School of International Business, Victoria University - Australia• Lise Lyck, Centre Director - Copenhagen Business School – Denmark• Prof. Helmut Schwägermann – Hochschule Osnabrueck University of Applied Sciences – GermanyInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    3. 3. Ambassador Programmes• Martin Robertson - School of International Business, Victoria University - AustraliaInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    4. 4. Investigating Ambassador Programs:Motives for Bidding for International Meetings and Events Presented by Martin Robertson School of International Business Victoria University 51st ICCA Congress 20-24 October 2012 San Juan, Puerto Rico
    5. 5. Acknowledgements• Research conducted with the support of ICCAWe wish to thank:• Ksenija Polla, Noor Ahmad Hamid and Martin Sirk at ICCA• Suzana Bishop, Melbourne Convention Exhibition Centre• Mike Cannon and Dylan Redas Noel, Sarawak Convention Bureau• Abdulla Yousuf Abdulla, Dubai Convention Bureau
    6. 6. Presentation Overview• Study Background• Literature Review• Research Aim• Method• Results• Where to Next?
    7. 7. Study Background• ICCA approached VU as a member university to conduct a cooperative research project• Given the lack of studies on ambassador programs and the role ‘ambassadors’ play in bidding for international meetings and events, it was jointly determined to undertake exploratory research in this area
    8. 8. Literature Review• No academic studies exist on ambassador programs• Limited studies on bidding for events by convention and visitor bureaus (Getz, 2003)• More work on bidding for major/mega sporting events, though still limited• ICCA has produced a guide titled Congress Ambassador Programmes as a ‘how to’ booklet• Limited other intelligence related to the topic
    9. 9. Research Aim To identify the motives of ambassadors in becoming activebidders for international association meetings and conventions
    10. 10. Method• Online survey administered in October 2012• The questionnaire instrument was refined with feedback from ICCA• Three programs surveyed – Club Melbourne, Melbourne – Sarawak Convention Bureau Ambassadors Conference Scholarship Program, Malaysia – Al Safeer, Dubai• Response rate: 19%, 54 respondents to date• Preliminary (topline) results presented here
    11. 11. Results Demographic Profile of Respondents•Gender – 63% male; 37% female•Education – vast majority of respondents (89%)had a postgraduate qualification•Work status – vast majority (78%) employedfull-time
    12. 12. Results• Age
    13. 13. Results Membership Profile of Respondents•Even mix of respondents across all programs,although relative to total ambassador numbersper program, Malaysian respondents are over-represented in the returned sample• The majority of respondents (51%) had beenmembers of their program for less than 2 years;37% members for 2-5 years
    14. 14. ResultsThe majority (67%) had attended one event/functionor more hosted by their program in 2011
    15. 15. ResultsAmbassadors actively attend international meetingsand events (32% attended 7 or more)
    16. 16. ResultsThe majority of ambassadors (61%) were activelybidding for international meetings and events
    17. 17. Results• Respondents who had been involved in bidding for an international meeting/event in the past 2 years, were asked, in reference to their most recent bid, whether or not it was successful. – 77% - Yes – 23% - No• These respondents were then asked using a 7-point scale their reasons for participating in the bid (1 = Not at all important; 7 = Extremely important)
    18. 18. ResultsRank Reason Mean Standard (Measured on 7-point scale) (n= 30) deviation1 Professional body support 5.60 1.652 Prestige or recognition for your professional body 5.60 1.913 Prestige or recognition for your country, region or city 5.40 1.794 Economic benefits for your country, region, city or 5.00 1.89 professional body5 Increased personal or professional profile 4.73 1.986 A prior indication of a high probability of success by the 4.47 1.68 award body7 Government directive/support 4.47 2.018 Personal encouragement by key stakeholders 4.40 2.119 Prestige or recognition for your employer 4.37 2.0410 Corporate support 4.17 2.0011 Career benefits 4.03 2.0912 Potential media coverage 3.90 2.2213 Social or other benefits 3.67 1.99
    19. 19. Results• Regardless of past bidding activity, all respondents were asked on a 7-point scale (1 = Not at all important; 7 = Extremely important), what factors they considered important when bidding for an international meeting/event• They were also asked about their future bidding intentions on a graphic rating scale(1 = Extremely unlikely; 100 = Extremely likely)
    20. 20. ResultsRank Reason N Mean Standard (Measured on 7-point scale) deviation1 Your professional networks 46 6.02 1.242 Resources available to make a bid 45 5.78 1.403 Support from the local meetings industry 46 5.76 1.434 Likely reputational benefits in your field from hosting the 46 5.74 1.45 event5 Profile of the event 45 5.67 1.386 Likelihood of bid success 44 5.25 1.547 Your personal networks 45 5.22 1.688 Likely economic impact of the event 46 5.20 1.499 Available time 44 5.20 1.6210 Cost of bidding 46 4.63 1.9511 Complexity of bid requirements 45 4.51 1.8712 Your role in the event of a successful bid 46 4.48 1.8513 Your level of influence over the event if the bid is 46 4.48 1.96 successful14 Risk of not hosting the event successfully 45 3.80 2.0715 Risk of not bidding 45 2.84 1.76
    21. 21. Results Reason N Mean Standard (Measured on scale – 1 to 100) deviationI intend to bid for an international meeting/event in the next 12 51 63.71 28.94monthsBeyond the next 12 months, I intend to bid for an international 52 70.12 21.97meeting/event in the next 2-3 years • Finally, ambassadors were asked to rate their level of agreement (on a graphic rating scale 1 =Strongly disagree; 100 =Strongly agree) with a series of summary statements regarding the value of ambassador programs
    22. 22. Results Reason N Mean Standard (Measured on scale – 1 to 100) deviationMy membership of an ambassador program has assisted me in 54 68.61 25.63bidding for international meetings/eventsMy membership of an ambassador program has assisted me in 53 62.02 23.39winning bids for international meetings/eventsAmbassador programs have an important role to play in 54 78.15 17.76ensuring destinations attract international meetings/eventsThe results indicate strong support for the value ofambassador programs in securing internationalmeetings and events
    23. 23. Where to next?• Analysis of the data collected will continue (including responses to a number of open-ended questions)• A research report will be drafted for comment by ICCA (end of November)• The research team will publish the findings of the study in a journal article to address the lack of academic studies on ambassador programs• Now the online survey has been developed, potential to administer the survey to other ambassador programs to facilitate cross-program and cross-country comparisons
    24. 24. Questions??? Project team•School of International Business, Victoria University – Dr Leonie Lockstone-Binney – Dr Paul Whitelaw – Martin Robertson – Dr Rodney Con Foo – & Dr Ian Michael, Zayed University, Dubai • For project queries contact: leonie.lockstone@vu.edu.au
    25. 25. Our Event Knowledge in Location
    26. 26. Sustainability in the meetings industry• Lise Lyck - Centre Director, Centre for Tourism and Culture Management - Copenhagen Business SchoolInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    27. 27. Chinas Outbound Meeting BusinessTeam effort:•Prof. Helmut Schwägermann, HochschuleOsnabrück.•Prof. Lan Xing, Shanghai Institute ofForeign Trade (SIFT)•Dr. Ding Yi, SIFTInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    28. 28. 51st ICCA Congress China’s Outbound Event Business- and how it will affect ICCA members Interim Report of a joint Research-Project of Hochschule Osnabrück (HSOS) and Shanghai Institute of Foreign Trade (SIFT) San Juan, 22. October 2012International Congress and Convention Association. Session sponsored by:Twitter: #ICCA12
    29. 29. What you will hear today1. Who we are2. Meetings, MICE or Business Events?3. Aim and Methodology of the Research Project4. Analysis of potential Driving Factors for outbound Event Activities5. Competitiveness and Brands of Nations/Destinations6. SummaryInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    30. 30. 1. Who we areSince 1993,Hochschule Osnabrueck,Faculty of BusinessManagement & Social Sciencesoffers Event Managementwith a focus onBusiness Events.We are a Pioneer in Germanyand the only German university,which has exported its EM-ProgrammeInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    31. 31. International Event ManagementShanghai (IEMS)Since 2004 we offer the Double-degree Bachelor ProgrammeInternational Event Management Shanghai (IEMS)We are the only Sino-Foreign Event Management Programme in China!as a joint venture between• Hochschule Osnabrück and• Shanghai Institute of Foreign Trade (SIFT)• in Shanghai for Chinese students• More than 350 Graduates so far• 50 % of curriculum by German lecturers• http://www.wiso.hs-osnabrueck.de/iems.html?&L=1International Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    32. 32. First Graduation Ceremony 2008
    33. 33. Exchange Students in Osnabrück
    34. 34. The Research Team• Prof. Helmut Schwägermann, HS Osnabrück, ICCA-member since 1986 (ICC Berlin, ConEcon Management Berlin, HS Osnabrück)• German Programme Director of IEMS• Prof. Lan Xing, SIFT, vast experience in the Chinese and International Exhibition and Event Industry• Chinese Programme Director of IEMS• Dr. Ding Yi, SIFT, researcher with an international background/educationInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    35. 35. 2. Meetings, MICE or Business Events?Business Events (B2B-Events) are events for participants, (targetgroups) who visit these events for professional reasons.Business Events include•association meetings and other NPO-meetings•corporate events as well as•trade fairs and exhibitionsThe reasons, we chose the broader approach (BE):1.We find these events often in a combination (meeting plusexhibition)2.Most ICCA members (Destinations, Venues, Agencies, etc.) are notonly interested in Association Meetings, but in international BusinessEvents of all kind!International Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    36. 36. Types Of Events Business Events Consumer Events 2. Trade fairs, exhibitions 4. Sport events1. Events of associations and 3. Corporate events other non-profit organisations - - Competitions / championships Trade fairs - Board meetings / - management meetings - Trainings Exhibitions− Congresses, conferences, - - Staff meeting / employees - Olympic games World exhibitions seminars - Etc. meetings− Board meetings, - Sales force meetings 5. Cultural events committee meetings - Incentives (competitions &− Congresses, conferences, travel) - Theatre plays seminars - Product presentations - Musicals, opera, operettas- Annual meetings - Dealers meeting - Concerts- Other educational events, - House fairs (corporate - Circus, varieté shows trainings exhibitions) - Art exhibitions- Political party conventions - Roadshows - Religious events (church- Election campaigns - Education trainings congress, mass)- Trade union conferences - Press conferences- Government conferences - Shareholder meetings 6. Social events, parties (NGO / INGO) - Open door event- press conferences - Etc. - Dancing balls / galas- Etc. - Opening events - Sponsoring / charity events - Street district / city parties - Discos - Weddings - Other private events 36 © Prof.Helmut Schwägermann, HS Osnabrück
    37. 37. 3. Research Aim and MethodologyResearch Question:How will the development of China`s Market forBusiness Events affect the international EventIndustry with a focus on ICCA members?International Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    38. 38. Research ScopeWe will research•the characteristics and development of the Chinese marketfor meetings and other business events•And analyse potential driving factors for global eventactivities•and ask for the regional/national distribution of theseactivities.•Finally we will end up with some strategic advices to ICCA-member as how to cope with this emerging market.International Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    39. 39. Our Research Statements:We expect that….1. Chinese Event Business will affect the Meeting Industry sooner than many of you think (Case: Trade Fair sector in China!)2. More individual or group of delegates/visitors will take part at international meetings/business events worldwide3. More Chinese decision makers (e.g. Board members in Intl. Associations or Corporations) will be influencing international meetings and the selection of destination4. More China-based or influenced business events will be going abroad, starting with incentive travel to Asian countries5. Countries with a high general and/or specific (BE) competitiveness will be gaining most from this developmentInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    40. 40. Phase-Model ICCA-China Research©
    41. 41. 4. Analysis of potential Driving Factors for outbound Event ActivitiesAs we started recently,we have many indicators and interesting data,Examples and case studies.But as of nowthis is more or lessa patchworkInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    42. 42. In order to predict the Future,Volume you have to analyse Past and Presentof BE Scenario Ain China BVolume ofOutgoing CBusiness Business Events Scenario A in China B Outgoing Event Activities C Past 2012 Future 2020+ © Prof. H. Schwägermann, Osnabrück / Berlin / Shanghai
    43. 43. We have identified potential Driving Factors for Outbound BE = Our Research Fields©
    44. 44. Are these Driving Factors relevant?(Co-relation and Factor-analysis)• Reveal the (co-)relation between the potential driving factors and the development of the outbound event business. Strong (A)? Medium((B)? Weak/Non-Existing(C)? A?DrivingFactor x B? C? Chinese Outbound BusinessInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    45. 45. ICCA China: Growth of 125 % in ten years The Association Meetings Market 2002-2011(no official Chinese statistics yet!) 17 The Association Meetings Market 2002-2011 4. Number of meetings per country Rank Country 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 1 U.S.A. 599 619 666 704 712 751 779 833 779 759 2 Germany 326 354 427 453 484 581 527 593 605 577 3 Spain 297 310 404 364 346 400 451 433 521 463 4 United Kingdom 320 333 328 417 430 413 447 432 481 434 5 France 293 300 390 378 413 398 474 428 414 428 6 Italy 301 329 360 337 357 408 427 457 410 363 7 Brazil 117 137 179 199 228 228 267 306 277 304 8 China-P.R. 134 88 232 235 285 304 307 324 324 302 9 Netherlands 175 192 238 244 236 246 288 298 241 291 10 Austria 115 153 168 201 241 251 234 261 227 267 11 Canada 196 174 216 212 222 267 300 249 252 255 12 Switzerland 159 173 170 206 201 213 224 241 262 240 13 Japan 219 209 226 256 264 307 325 306 332 233 14 Portugal 113 135 153 155 161 216 204 214 207 228 15 Republic of Korea 118 95 162 143 178 164 219 209 197 207 16 Australia 172 173 189 191 210 218 208 201 254 204 17 Sweden 141 148 162 164 189 173 200 227 217 195 18 Argentina 54 60 96 106 109 140 156 170 195 186 19 Belgium 118 101 128 151 155 172 186 179 212 179International Congress and 115 20 Mexico Convention Association 126 144 122 144 150 170 145 160 175.Twitter: #ICCA12 21 Poland 68 65 101 124 119 125 141 142 116 165 22 Finland 115 122 126 116 142 140 163 149 161 163
    46. 46. China‘s exhibition industry has developedmuch earlier than the meeting industry!• All international trade fair companies have subsidiaries in China• Some of them organise more and more important exhibitions in China than at home• China is going to be the most important exhibition place worldwideInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    47. 47. Asia covers 20% of all exhibition space Table 1 - Venues and indoor exhibition space in 2011 - Number & CapacityInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12 Venues and indoor exhibition space in 2011 - Number of venues by Table 2 - Source: ufi size (in sqm)
    48. 48. China‘s share: 68% Figure 4: China’s share of Asia’s total available exhibition space, 2004-2013 7 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 6 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 5 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 4 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 R est 3 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 C h in a 2 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 1 ,0 0 0 ,0 0 0 0 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 Source: BSG research & analysisInternational Congress largest exhibitions centres in Asia are Eight of the top ten and Convention Association located in China. The.Twitter: #ICCA12 two largest venues outside of China are IMPACT in Thailand (137,000 m2) and ufi Source: 2
    49. 49. Exhibitions in China 2010/11 grow by 18 %!International Congress and Convention Association. Source Statistics and Analysis reportTwitter: #ICCA12 of China Exhibition Industry 2011
    50. 50. Economy and TradeInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    51. 51. Growing Economy (GDP) indicate morechances for Business EventsInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12 Source: ChinaInNumbers BFC_Q1 2012
    52. 52. China‘s Export = Business Relations1. US 2. HK 3. Japan 4.SK 5. Germany 6. Netherlands...International Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12 Source: ChinaInNumbers BFC_Q1 2012
    53. 53. China‘s Import = Business relations1. Japan 2. South Korea 3. US ..... 6. GermanyInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    54. 54. Yuan is getting stronger:Events outside China getting less expensiveInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    55. 55. FDI-Outflows Are Growing Quickly Since 2005.Might overweigh inflows soon?International Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12 Source: ChinaInNumbers BFC_Q1 2012
    56. 56. Chinese Direct Investment (FDI) in the US:Cas study Lenovo: will need meetingsInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    57. 57. Innovation, R&D, Co-operation betweenUniversities• The more co-operation between international universities and R&R Institutios, the more meetings will be held in the respective countriesInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    58. 58. Patent applications as indicator for R&D-activities and more meetingsInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12 Source: ChinaInNumbers BFC_Q1 2012
    59. 59. Chinese Outbound Tourism to Europe(contradicting data and definitions (HK & Macao)35.9 million touriststravelled from China in2011. Of these, 24.7million travelled withinNortheast Asia, while11.1 million (31.0%)travelled to long hauldestinations.Chinese tourist arrivalsto Europe in 2011totalled 3.9 million,representing 34.8% ofthe Chinese long hauloutbound market.International Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12 Source: ETC- July 2012 Trends and Outloo
    60. 60. 2011: 70 Mio. Outbound Tourists,3,2 Mio. for outbound meetingsInternational Congress and Convention Association. Source: Annual Report of China Outbound Tourism DevelopmentTwitter: #ICCA12 published 2012 by Beijing Tourism Education Press
    61. 61. 2011: Asia 51,6 mio., Europe 2,3 mio.,America 1,5 mio.International Congress and Convention Association Source: Annual Report of China Outbound Tourism Development>.Twitter: #ICCA12 published 2012 by Beijing Tourism Education Press
    62. 62. For Germany, China will be the most important sourcemarket for tourists in Asia soon
    63. 63. Growing Chinese Influence in International Associations.Case study Prof. Jianan LiThe International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ISPRM)International Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12 http://www.isprm.org/?CategoryID=232&ArticleID=93
    64. 64. 5. Countries/ Destinations:Image/ Selection Process/ Strategy• Which countries will be affected most?• What is the Image/Brand of your country?• Is the Chinese Destination Selection Process different?• Do You ICCA members (Destinations and other Suppliers have a clear Regional Strategy?• And what about China?International Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    65. 65. A positive nation brand provides a crucialcompetitive advantage.How is your country rated?International Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    66. 66. benefited the U.S. in that respect, and raised the country’s governance ranking over Spain, Italy and Ireland.” Anholt- GfK R oper Nation B ra nds I ndex S MAnholt-GfK Roper Nation Brand Index Overall B rand Ranking ( Top 10 of 50 Na tions) 2011 2010 1 United States United States 2 Germany Germany 3 United Kingdom France 4 France United Kingdom 5 Japan Japan 6 Canada Canada 7 Italy Italy 8 Australia Switzerland 9 Switzerland AustraliaInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    67. 67. Destination Selection Factors: Price andlocation seem to be most important factorsInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12 Source: The China and Asia Meetings Industry Research Report 2011
    68. 68. Summary• Chinas Business Events sector has grown enormously in the last years• Many related factors (Driving factors?) have shown a similar tendency• But: how will China influence the international Event Industry in the years to come?• Our findings will be presented at the next GA 2013 in ShanghaiInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    69. 69. 51st ICCA Congress Thank you! Thanks to ICCA for their support! Further Supporters and Sponsors are welcome!International Congress and Convention Association. Session sponsored by:Twitter: #ICCA12
    70. 70. Scholarship student• Alison Bottcher – Victoria University; AustraliaInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    71. 71. DEVELOPING A SUCCESSFUL BID PERTH, WESTERN AUSTRALIAAlison Bottcher22 October 2012
    72. 72. ABSTRACTPURPOSE: to analyse the competitive bidding process and the critical areasthat need to be addressed in order to produce a successful bidMETHODOLOGY: In order to best respond, a secondary analysis of existingcase studies was conducted. This was then used to develop a comprehensive bidin response to a hypothetical tender document for a scientific conference.FINDINGS: Our research derived a possible way for Western Australia tosuccessfully respond to a bid. Several critical success factors were identified: • meeting specific site requirements • presenting an effective destination brand • having strong support and financial partnerships • providing a unique conceptPRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Higher ratios of successful bids could beachieved by addressing the critical success factors identified.
    73. 73. LOCATION• Branding• Accessibility• Track record for hosting events• Facilities• Pre and Post Tour options
    74. 74. SITE REQUIREMENTS• Nature of conference/event• Number of attendees/delegates• Audio Visual Requirements• Accessibility• Room requirements • Meeting rooms • Conference halls • Banquet facilities • Breakout rooms
    75. 75. PARTNERSHIPS AND SUPPORTGovernment and industry support • Tourism Australia • Tourism Western Australia • Perth Convention Bureau • Meetings Industry Australia • ICCA•Sponsorship
    76. 76. ORIGINALITY• Theming• Education Programs/Topics• Flexibility • Treating bid uniquely • Responding directly to specific requests of tender document/organisation
    77. 77. Scholarship student• Dominika Fudala – Copenhagen Business School - DenmarkInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    78. 78. Round table discussions• Input and feedback on current research projects• Ideas and suggestions for future research projectsInternational Congress and Convention Association.Twitter: #ICCA12
    79. 79. 51st ICCA Congress Thank you!International Congress and Convention Association. Session sponsored by:Twitter: #ICCA12

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