Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Just Add Water: Approaches to Smart Agricultural Water Management

184 views

Published on

Presentation by Rachael McDonnell, Sonali Senaratna Sellamuttu, Petra Schmitter

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Just Add Water: Approaches to Smart Agricultural Water Management

  1. 1. Just Add Water: Approaches to Smart Agricultural Water Management Rachael McDonnell, Sonali Senaratna Sellamuttu, Petra Schmitter Building a research-for-development partnership for thriving drylands in a changing climate Madrid, 6th Dec 2019
  2. 2. IWMI - Tackling Global Water Challenges
  3. 3. • Water runs through every action track of the GCA report • Water is the first and worst hit resource by climate change • Water is vital and connects sectors Global Commission on Adaptation - 2019 Chapter 2 Food Security and Smallholder Livelihoods a) Help small-scale producers and most vulnerable manage risks b) Policy coherence by making agriculture climate smart Chapter 4 Water - actions tracks a) Harness the power of nature and expand water infrastructure b) Cope with scarcity by using water more productively c) Prepare for a changing climate by planning for floods and droughts https://gca.org/global-commission-on-adaptation/report
  4. 4. Tackling climate change and water in Myanmar o Vulnerable to climate change [Global Climate Risk Index– ranked 2nd of 187 countries in 2016]. o Both droughts and floods negatively affect livelihoods and economic development
  5. 5. Change in Rainfall by 2050, 2070 and 2090 for rcp8.5 scenario • 7 RCMs- Percentage of Annual rainfall change between 1986-2005 and 2031-2050, 2051-2070 and 2071-2090 respectively
  6. 6. 1) Use water more productively https://via.farm/
  7. 7. 2) Increasing water availability Caveats on small reservoirs • Under the driest climate scenarios, small reservoirs perform marginally less well (< 4- 8%)1 • Small reservoir tend to underperform due to weak institutions, sedimentation, poor site selection, inadequate maintenance2 Small reservoirs hold significant untapped potential in sub-Saharan Africa1 Sources: 1 Giordano et al.(2012); 2Saruchera and Jonathan Lautze (2019); 3Amarasinghe et al. (2016); 4Owusu et al. (2017) Manage aquifer recharge (MAR) is a promising storage alternative for smallholders Managed aquifer recharge can • Utilize rains, floods, treated wastewater • Replenish groundwater & enhance baseflows in rivers • Reduce saltwater intrusion & land subsidence Widespread suitability in Africa, dependent on3 • Landscape characteristics • Soil and aquifer properties • Availability of surface water 32% of Northern Ghana4 suitable for MAR Bhungroo MAR structure 369 million people reached $20 billion revenue annually 22 million hectares irrigated
  8. 8. Click to edit Master text styles Irrigation development potential SSA: • Large-scale: 15.2 million hectares1 • Farmer-led (MP): 29.7 million hectares2 185 million people reached $22 billion revenue annually Many technologies remain out of reach of smallholder farmers. Women and resource-poor farmers are particularly disadvantaged. Sources: 1 You et al. (2011); 2Xie et al. (2014)
  9. 9. 3) Bring innovations such as solar irrigation under smarter water management Sources: 1 Schmitter et al..(2018), Mansoor et al. (2019)
  10. 10. On-grid systems: Sell solar ‘as a crop’ to mitigate overexploitation of groundwater & enhance incomes1 Off-grid systems: Can provide energy access, food and livelihood security, access to water2 Benefits of the model • Reliable day-time energy for irrigation • Feed-in tariff for selling excess electricity to the grid • Supplementary, counter-seasonal incomes for farmers • Diversified, cleaner power grids Benefits of the model • Reduced prohibitive upfront costs • Relatively equal distribution of risk amongst gov., lender and borrower • Tailored financing to farmers’ needs (e.g., repayment schedules) Pilot on- and off-grid solar solutions Sources: 1 Shah et al. (2018); 2 Otoo et al. (2018)
  11. 11. Rachael McDonnell r.mcdonnell@cgiar.org Sonali Senaratna Sellamuttu s.senaratnasellamuttu@cgiar.org Petra Schmitter p.schmitter@cgiar.org

×