Pandemic Files2009

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IBM Pandemic Event consolidated presentation

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Pandemic Files2009

  1. 1. IBM Global Technology Services Are you ready for a Pandemic? Agenda 10:00 Introduction from the EPS and IBM - Anne Sheehan – IBM 10:05 Implications for Business Activity - Michael Conway – EPS 10:35 The Public Health Side of Pandemic Planning - Gavin Maguire – HSE 11:05 Pandemic preparedness and response - Russell Lindburg – IBM 11:40 Q&A 12:00 Lunch and Refreshments © Copyright IBM Corporation 2009
  2. 2. Implications for Business Activity – Business Continuity Planning in a Pandemic Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  3. 3. MICHAEL CONWAY DIRECTOR RENAISSANCE CONTINGENCY SERVICES EMERGENCY PLANNING SOCIETY (REPUBLIC OF IRELAND BRANCH) Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  4. 4. Set the Scene Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  5. 5. Question Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  6. 6. Human suffering and loss of life would obviously outweigh economic concerns. BUT Life goes on. Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  7. 7. Inevitability A pandemic is occurring, waves will follow and another Pandemic will follow Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  8. 8. So don’t just plan for now and this pandemic Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  9. 9. BCM Definition “Business Continuity Management is a holistic management process that identifies potential impacts that threaten an organisation and provides a framework for building resilience and the capability for an effective response that safeguards the interests of its staff, key stakeholders, reputation, brand and value creating activities.” Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  10. 10. Businesses should develop policies and plans for interruption Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  11. 11. Plans should cover • Personnel/Employee • Environmental • Communications • Technology Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  12. 12. Personnel/Employee – Work and social travel – Quarantine, who pays for quarantine – Communications plan – Advise employees of risks and plans – Managing cross skilling and transfer of knowledge Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  13. 13. Personnel/Employee contd – Agree and advise staff on: • policies relating to Family illness, • self imposed or other quarantine, post holiday quarantine, • Obligation to advise employer of location of holiday etc. – Give Employees a Family Pandemic Plan Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  14. 14. Environmental • Building – Hand rubs – Tissues – Hygiene notices • Transport arrangements to work • Building air handling • Restrictions on entry to building of persons with flu like symptoms Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  15. 15. Communications • Policies for external and internal communications – Detailed Staff instructions – Specific material for customers – Specific material for suppliers Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  16. 16. Technology – Work from home procedures and practices Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  17. 17. Supply Chain, Logistics, Key Suppliers, Key Customers •Management of contractors •E.g. Cleaning staff, catering staff, deliveries and collections, refuse services etc •Contractual Obligations •Develop Policies to operate in Pandemic Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  18. 18. Recommendations • As a minimum every organisation should: – Review/exercise your Incident Management Plans if not done in past 6 months – Verify that contact details are up-to-date – Check out technical and procedural aspects of "Work from home" options – Work closely with your occupational physician/medical advisor – Use video links and teleconferencing to reduce the amount of face-to-face contact and travel – Consider postponing face-to-face training courses, unnecessary travel, and work-related social events Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  19. 19. Key Advice • Establish responsibility for continuity planning • Develop a continuity plan in consultation with employees, customers, suppliers and service providers • Develop and deliver an employee personal plan • Identify critical activities and employees and inputs required • Consider impact of employee absences, disruption of supply chains, and increase or decrease in demand. • Communication, human resource, travel and insurance policies should be put in place to cope with influenza pandemic • Prepare policies to reduce the risk of infection in the work place. Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  20. 20. Things to Do - Take Responsibility: • Bring Pandemic Planning to Board Level • Allocate responsibility for monitoring and managing BCM • Ensure Chain of Command is precise and Clear • Educate Board and Management • Develop Policies to operate in Pandemic Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  21. 21. Things to Do – Technology: • Implement technology for flexible working for employees • Implement technology for flexible working for Customers/Suppliers • Test technology and remote working • Effective telecommunications • Computing capabilities. Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  22. 22. Things to Do – Communications: • Develop communications plan for customers and staff. • Advise employees of the risks and the plans in place. • Policies for external and internal communications • Detailed Staff instruction for operating. Specific material for customers Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  23. 23. Things to Do - Develop Plans: • Plan with key suppliers and customers developing coordinated plans. • Ensure adequate physical security for operating in crisis. Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  24. 24. Summary • Pandemic Planning for Business Continuity is an extension of normal BC Planning. • The prime difference is that the disruption may be national or international rather than local and the impacts and risks will be different • The BC Planning Model still works. Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  25. 25. Resources See list available Implications for Business Activity - Continuity Planning ® Renaissance Contingency Services Ltd ©
  26. 26. The Public Health side of Pandemic Planning by Mr Gavin Maguire 3rd September 2009
  27. 27. Health Service Planning to date HSE began planning for an Influenza Pandemic in late 2005. Influenza Pandemic Steering group formed Expert Group re-established. National plan published in January 2007. Expert Group report published in January 2007. Some elements of this plan were put in place between 2007 and April 2009.
  28. 28. With the emergence of Swine Flu in April 2009 the HSE National Crisis Management Team was convened to;- – Refine and implement elements of the plan that were ready. – Review and escalate the elements of the plan not ready. Since its first convening on the 26th April the NCMT has been meeting regularly to co-ordinate preparations.
  29. 29. Regional Crisis Management Teams have been meeting to co-ordinate regional preparedness in accordance with the decisions of the National Crisis Management Team.
  30. 30. Influenza Pandemic Roles and Responsibilities Groups and Teams; – Interdepartmental Committee on Public Health Emergencies, – National Public Health Emergency Team, – Expert Advisory Group, – HSE National & Regional Crisis Management Teams.
  31. 31. The key strategic issues for the project are;- Mass Vaccination – Objective is to prevent people becoming infected with the Swine Flu Virus. – The rate of hospitalisations, sickness, death and absenteeism from work will hopefully be significantly reduced by the mass vaccination programme. – Concern is that the virus could re-assort or shift reducing or eliminating the vaccine effect.
  32. 32. The key strategic issues for the project are;- Mass Vaccination – 7.8m ordered - 2 Doses per person. – Delivery to commence this month. – Vaccinations to commence Mid October. – Logistics are enormously complex. – Significant staff redeployment required. – Purpose designed IT system being put in place.
  33. 33. The key strategic issues for the project are;- Mass Vaccination – Priority groups set and under constant review. – Uptake of Vaccination will be important. – Objective is to cause minimum disruption to commerce and industry as possible during the vaccination programme. – Some waiting times will be unavoidable.
  34. 34. Telephone Hotline/Web based support tool – Automated telephone and web based system to provide support to the public. – Required to offer support to Public and to reduce pressure on Primary Care. – Will be ready by end of October. – Initially will provide diagnosis and identification as to risk group. – Will also offer advise regarding managing ill at home. – Most callers who are diagnosed will be advised to stay at home and only contact their GP if their condition does not improve. – At risk patients will be advised to contact their GP.
  35. 35. Flu Clinics – A new care setting to provide face to face diagnostic and basic treatment services for Pandemic Patients. – Would be activated if GP’s were becoming overwhelmed. – However cannot be activated at the same time as vaccination programme is underway. – Locations identified, staff rosters ready.
  36. 36. Critical Care Surge Capacity – Hospital critical care capacity will be stretched. – Areas outside of Intensive care will have to be used. – More staff need to be trained in ventilation. – Ventilation capacity to be maximised.
  37. 37. Information Management – The MT,NCMT and RCMT’s will require accurate and timely information on what impact the Pandemic is having particularly during a severe wave. – Responsibility has been assigned for the co-ordination of all pandemic information required for crisis management.
  38. 38. Primary and Secondary Care Surge Capacity and Business Continuity – Hospitals and Local Health Office’s have been working through Pandemic Action Checklists for the last couple of years. – These checklists have been updated to reflect the recent considerations of the NCMT.
  39. 39. - The modelling data supporting local planning is currently being updated to reflect emerging understanding of Swine Flu. - All parts of the HSE will suffer staff absenteeism and must plan accordingly. - Disruption to supply chains may arise. - Non essential activities may need to be postponed to facilitate staff redeployment.
  40. 40. Pandemic preparedness and response Are you ready for this unique threat? Russ Lindburg IBM Business Continuity & Resiliency Services September 3, 2009 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  41. 41. Agenda Pandemic: A unique threat requiring a unique response Five critical areas for workforce continuity planning Are you ready? Assessing your existing plans What you should be doing now How a service provider can help 41 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  42. 42. The world is riskier than it used to be Changing environment More complex regulations Expanding risk exposures Changing industry and regulatory standards Increased global and regional Geographic dispersal requirements Interdependencies Varying regulations per country Supply chain disruption Heightened impact of business disruption Impact of coping with the financial turmoil Greater financial implications of downtime Loss of critical personnel Brand vulnerabilities Loss of key knowledge Data integrity requirements Reduction in attention to significance of risk Reduction in testing recovery plans On top of these threats the potential impact of the H1N1 pandemic adds a new dimension that requires unique planning and a unique response Source: IBM GTS Market Insights Analysis based on Goldman Sachs, “IT Spending Survey: Downturn takes its toll,” March 9, 2009 42 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  43. 43. Pandemic – what to expect Lessons from SARS and H5N1 taught us that the human factor in planning is a critical component for any continuity plan and that organizations were not as well prepared as they thought they were. High rates of illness and death could impact your employees and their families—and your customers, partners and suppliers. You should expect significant disruption to international and national infrastructures and commerce. Employee absenteeism may reach operations-crippling levels. 43 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  44. 44. Industries hardest hit All Industries: High rates of employee absenteeism anticipated, especially in industries like law enforcement, transportation and communication, increasing operational losses Global Financial System Health, Public Safety and companies involved with Social Welfare Trade, Transportation and Tourism Source: International Monetary Fund; The Global Economic and Financial Impact of an Avian Flu Pandemic and the Role of the IMF 44 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  45. 45. Functional areas in corporations hardest hit Areas that require face-to-face interaction -- due to absenteeism and potential travel restrictions Communications – internal and external Transportation and Distribution Corporate Governance Information Technology Source: International Monetary Fund; The Global Economic and Financial Impact of an Avian Flu Pandemic and the Role of the IMF 45 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  46. 46. Difference between Pandemic and Traditional Continuity Plans Most crisis management and business continuity plans focus on a disaster’s impact on sites and equipment. Traditional Business Continuity Pandemic Related Business Continuity Assumes this is only your problem – This is everyone’s problem – customers, competitors, customers and community competitors and surrounding community are infrastructure is unaffected – localized affected by the same event – widespread impact impact Normal staffing levels are available Up to 40% staff absent and unavailable for work Critical business processes supported May need to prioritize critical processes due Normal cyclical peaks and valley’s in to limited staff business May be drastic fluctuations in demand – up or Shorter duration down Limited or no advance notice Longer duration, multiple waves Survival of your company is primary focus Some advance notice Key employees and backups identified Company survival, plus contribution to and assumed to be available community response Risk of large % key employees unavailable 46 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  47. 47. Why existing business continuity plans are unlikely to work Existing business continuity plans are unlikely to be adequate to respond to a pandemic type of disruption. Mismatch exists between Plans developed do not business requirements and Facilities consider the impact across the recovery plans and capabilities industry and/or community Plans are not exercised Network availability can be or maintained at a major bottleneck in appropriate levels of Technology People Network restoring business detail operations Internal and/or external Plans do not effectively communications Information address the impacts of a processes are not crisp regional emergency Dependency on key personnel Major disruptions to availability of not properly addressed in human capital resources not plans previously considered Internal and external dependencies are not adequately identified or properly documented. 47 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  48. 48. Why are interdependencies so critical? Pandemic preparedness strategies must consider interdependencies in order to achieve their intended goals. No organization is an island with its systems or operations. Organizations depend upon the public infrastructure for critical services: – Electricity, Gas, Water, Telecommunications, Transportation. – Services including Police, Fire, Public Safety and Emergency Management. – Medical and Government Services. Companies interact electronically with their suppliers, customers and partners. Many organizations do not fully understand all internal and external interdependencies. 48 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  49. 49. The five “C’s” of successful workforce continuity planning Command and Control How will crisis management decisions be made? Are succession plans in place? How will you interact with local authorities? Counseling Communication How will you track the well- How will you get information to being of your workforce during your workforce and the public? a disruption? How will you collaborate with What resources will you customers, suppliers and provide to help employees and partners? their families? Contingency Connectivity Is workforce recovery included in How will your workforce securely your current continuity plans? access information and Have you cross-trained workers for technology? business critical processes? Will you have sufficient network Do you have alternate workspace if bandwidth for remote access? you primary office is not available? 49 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  50. 50. Pandemic planning & preparedness -- key components Many companies are unsure of where to start, or how well their accomplishments to date measure up to emerging standards and guidelines. Company pandemic strategy, policy and guidelines. Executive sponsorship of pandemic planning. Critical resource identification and tracking. Communication and education plans for employees, customers. Human resource planning and monitoring. Employee impact and mitigation plans. Proximity to healthcare facilities. Supply chain impact and mitigation plans Government interface plans. Linkages to crisis and business continuity plans. Business function and location-specific impact. IT, network, security and workplace infrastructure continuity. Pandemic plan testing, audit and maintenance. 50 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  51. 51. What you should be doing now Plan for the unique challenges a pandemic can bring. Define or update a flexible contingency plan that augments your existing business resilience plans. Rehearse your pandemic plan to ensure it works as intended. Include employees, suppliers, partners, etc. to ensure no gaps exist. Educate your workforce and communicate policies for work-at-home, absenteeism, cross-training, social distancing and safe hygiene. Create or revise policies to meet goals. Track infected or absent employees to assist in well-being and fill critical roles via predetermined succession plans. Review agreements with DR service providers to ensure service levels adequately support pandemic plans. Automate wherever practical to provide virtual office capabilities and alert notifications. Ensure you have planned adequately for network loads. Engage local authorities to obtain up-to-date outbreak information and guidance. 51 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  52. 52. How a service provider can help Getting additional help… Assess and understand the potential impact of a pandemic across multiple facets of your organization Assist with planning and testing Maintain continuity of your business operations through extensive recovery resources and facilities Provide technology and automation to improve overall plan effectiveness Safeguard your brand reputation Demonstrate preparedness and corporate responsibility 52 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  53. 53. Final Thoughts Pandemic is a relatively new stressor in the world of business and industry. Effective pandemic preparedness and response is part of an overall business resilience program. Pandemic is global in scope and is characterized by widespread risk and uncertainty. We are all on a new learning curve – some farther along than others. This is not easy to do – get help if you need it. The hardest part of building a recovery capability is explaining why you didn’t. 53 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  54. 54. Thank you for your time today. For more information, visit: ibm.com/services/continuity Contact: Russ Lindburg +1-630-568-7516 lindburg@us.ibm.com 54 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  55. 55. Trademarks and notes IBM Corporation 2009 IBM, the IBM logo, ibm.com, System i and System p are trademarks or registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. If these and other IBM trademarked terms are marked on their first occurrence in this information with the appropriate symbol (® or ™), these symbols indicate US registered or common law trademarks owned by IBM at the time this information was published. Such trademarks may also be registered or common law trademarks in other countries. A current list of IBM trademarks is available on the Web at “Copyright and trademark information” at www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml Adobe, the Adobe logo, PostScript, the PostScript logo, Cell Broadband Engine, Intel, the Intel logo, Intel Inside, the Intel Inside logo, Intel Centrino, the Intel Centrino logo, Celeron, Intel Xeon, Intel SpeedStep, Itanium, IT Infrastructure Library, ITIL, Java and all Java-based trademarks, Linux, Microsoft, Windows, Windows NT, the Windows logo, and UNIX are trademarks or service marks of others as described under “Special attributions” at: http://www.ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml#section-special Other company, product and service names may be trademarks or service marks of others. References in this publication to IBM products or services do not imply that IBM intends to make them available in all countries in which IBM operates. BUP03005-USEN-02 55 © 2009 IBM Corporation
  56. 56. IBM Global Technology Services Thank You Q&A © Copyright IBM Corporation 2009

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