White       Paper                        The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT        World      Focus on IBM SONAS ...
White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                   ...
White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                   ...
White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                   ...
White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                   ...
White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                   ...
White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                   ...
White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                   ...
                                                                                                                          ...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

ESG white paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World

233 views

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
233
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
4
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

ESG white paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World

  1. 1.    White   Paper        The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT    World  Focus on IBM SONAS    By Terri McClure      February, 2011                                  This ESG White Paper was commissioned by IBM    and is distributed under license from ESG.      © 2011, Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc.  All Rights Reserved 
  2. 2. White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                                               2 Contents  Introduction: Why Storage Needs to Catch up with Server Virtualization .................................................. 3  The Limits of Traditional NAS in Virtual Environments ............................................................................................ 4  IBM SONAS: The New Face of NAS ........................................................................................................................... 5  SONAS in Real Life: Financial Services .......................................................................................................... 6  SONAS in Real Life: Life Sciences .................................................................................................................. 7  The Bigger Truth ........................................................................................................................................... 8  All trademark names are property of their respective companies. Information contained in this publication has been obtained by sources TheEnterprise Strategy Group (ESG) considers to be reliable but is not warranted by ESG. This publication may contain opinions of ESG, which aresubject to change from time to time. This publication is copyrighted by The Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc. Any reproduction or redistribution ofthis publication, in whole or in part, whether in hard-copy format, electronically, or otherwise to persons not authorized to receive it, without theexpress consent of the Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc., is in violation of U.S. copyright law and will be subject to an action for civil damages and, ifapplicable, criminal prosecution. Should you have any questions, please contact ESG Client Relations at (508) 482-0188.   © 2011, Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 
  3. 3. White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                                               3 Introduction: Why Storage Needs to Catch up with Server Virtualization Todays data centers dont look anything like they did ten years ago. Server virtualization made a huge impact on IT, and its flexibility and agility keep it spreading throughout the data center. Increased use of server virtualization is far and away the top IT priority for users surveyed in ESG’s annual IT spending survey (Figure 1).1 Virtualization means more to IT than just reducing physical space—though eliminating that waste is a huge boon for the bottom line. It means that resources can be directed as needed, on demand, to wherever theyre needed in the infrastructure. That helps organizations stay ahead of new and dynamic application requirements, like those related to cloud and web 2.0.  Figure 1. Most Important IT Priorities 2011 ‐ 2012  Which of the following would you consider to be your organization’s most important  IT priorities over the next 12‐18 months? (Percent of respondents, N=611, ten  responses accepted) Increase use of server virtualization  30% Manage data growth 24% Information security initiatives 24% Major application deployments or upgrades  23% Improve data backup and recovery 22% Desktop virtualization 21% Data center consolidation 21% Business continuity/disaster recovery programs 20% Large‐scale desktop/laptop PC refresh 19% Regulatory compliance initiatives 18% 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35%   Source: Enterprise Strategy Group, 2011. As virtualization spreads from servers into desktops and storage and as private clouds grow, IT is transforming itself. The old stovepiped systems, bounded by physical limits, are becoming dynamic resource pools that IT teams can use in any way they want. The new kind of IT can handle the rampant growth of unstructured data, plus host web 2.0 applications and cloud computing.  ITs transformation will add great flexibility, but it will also eliminate a lot of data center waste. Plenty of data centers are filled with servers and storage bought separately to support applications as they were deployed. But now, much of that capacity is stranded, locked away in siloed systems that are not connected to other servers. Its wasted. In an ideal situation, that capacity can be pooled with other stranded resources and made available to the business. That’s what virtual IT is all about—no more walls or physical boundaries constraining how and where capacity can be used. Virtualization has helped give servers new life and rescue some capacity and resources, but storage has lagged in many respects. Storage technologies are starting to catch up, though, and systems that break down physical                                                       1  Source: ESG Research Report, 2011 IT Spending Intentions Survey, January 2011.  © 2011, Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 
  4. 4. White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                                               4 boundaries and offer shared storage clusters—like IBMs SONAS—are helping to transform storage into a shared resource pool.  The Limits of Traditional NAS in Virtual Environments Traditional scale‐up NAS platforms solved a lot of problems when they were invented. They handled client‐server‐based environments with direct server and storage relationships, and enabled file sharing and consolidation. These platforms often supported individual departments, with a system dedicated to each. At that time, petabyte capacities werent on anyones horizon and neither were the huge files that todays environments are producing.  Fast‐growing file systems have proved too much for traditional file‐based NAS. The way traditional, scale‐up NAS systems are architected means that new NAS arrays need to be added as capacity and performance needs exceed  the physical boundaries of the system and the amount of management resources required to provision, monitor, and tune the systems grows exponentially as new systems are added. File data growth is happening much quicker than block data growth and its causing filer sprawl and extremely complex environments, which require more and more load balancing and data migration tasks. These complex environments create a massive operational overhead, and they make effective data protection nearly impossible. Todays data centers are handling new, emerging applications that need high throughput, massive scalability, and petabyte‐scale resources. Those include stream analytics, commercial high‐performance computing (HPC), and web 2.0. And, as sensors, RFID, meters, surveillance systems, and other applications that create massive amounts of data gain popularity, this data needs to be stored in systems that can overcome physical boundaries and scale.  Applications that use geographic information systems (GIS), for example, help businesses ship products and gather information with remote sensors. This all adds up to real‐time expectations for IT environments, and doing business in real time means technology needs to keep up. These applications and data all demand a service‐oriented architecture that can be as dynamic as the environment it’s in and self‐tune, self heal, self‐manage, and self‐balance—and thats not what traditional NAS does.  Scale‐out NAS systems can help users transform their file storage environments into dynamic environments that can keep pace with the application and server environments they need to support. Scale‐out NAS interests the majority of IT professionals, according to ESG research: 40% of those surveyed (IT managers responsible for storage environments) planned to deploy scale‐out systems in the next two years, while 26% were interested in the technology and 18% had started to use it already.2 For current scale‐out storage users, theres a lot to like. For 50% of current users and 36% of planned adopters, improved scalability is the number one reason for use. Other top deployment considerations for current and potential users were improved scalability, faster provisioning, easier management, improved availability, and lower cost of infrastructure. Improved performance in throughput and IOPS also got top marks.  3 Pressure on IT to become leaner and faster is driving interest in technology options like scale‐out NAS. In an ESG survey in November of 2008, 45% of respondents said that internal pressures to reduce overall business costs were driving storage spending. The leading key criterion for choosing storage infrastructures was operational cost, with 50% of respondents choosing that option. And for three years running (2009, 2010, and 2011), users surveyed in ESG’s annual storage spending intentions study indicated that cost reduction initiatives have the biggest impact on IT spending decisions and that the main way to justify IT investments to the business team is with a reduction in operational costs.                                                           2  Source: ESG Research Report, Scale Out Storage Market Trends, December 2010. 3  Source: Ibid.  © 2011, Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 
  5. 5. White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                                               5  Figure 2. Why Users Adopt or Plan To Adopt Scale‐out NAS  Which of the following considerations drove the adoption of ‐‐ or is driving the  interest in ‐‐ scale‐out storage for your organization? (Percent of respondents,  multiple responses accepted) Improved scalability 50% 35% Improved performance (throughput) 39% 32% Lower cost of infrastructure 38% 29% Currently  Faster storage provisioning times 38% using scale‐ 25% out storage  Easier to manage 36% (N=56) 33% Improved performance (I/Os) 32% Plan to use  28% scale‐out  Improved data availability 27% storage  31% (N=122) Reduced operating expenditures 27% 29% Improved storage hardware utilization  25% 26% Improved data management 23% 29% Need to support specific applications 16% 12% 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60%   Source: Enterprise Strategy Group, 2010. IBM SONAS: The New Face of NAS  With its Scale Out NAS solution, (SONAS), IBM has demonstrated its recognition of the future of enterprise storage: a scale‐out architecture, in line with industry trends for price and virtualized clustered file service performance, will be a critical component. That scale‐out architecture must facilitate robust, high‐availability platforms that offer non‐disruptive operations, investment protection, and independent scalability of both capacity and performance throughput.  SONAS grew out of IBMs General Parallel File System (GPFS), which first debuted out of the Almaden labs in 1993. Its been deployed in some of the worlds largest and most demanding environments, with very large clusters and multi‐petabyte capacity—including at IBM itself. It powers IBMs global storage architecture with more than 400,000 employees. IBM has a pedigree of rolling out highly scalable and available file storage architectures. It initially rolled out Scale Out File Services (SOFS), which was a solution originally offered by IBM Global Services that includes GPFS combined with a variety of IBM software solutions, customized to meet specific user requirements. Recognizing the requirements for flexible and scalable virtual storage environments for file server consolidation and virtual server environments, IBM introduced a streamlined appliance version of the offering that evolved into SONAS. SONAS hides the complexity of delivering a highly scalable virtualized architecture and leverages embedded advanced features based on Tivoli HSM and TSM. Most importantly, it makes scale‐out NAS easy to configure and use in an appliance form factor. SONAS provides a scalable, virtual file storage platform that grows with data, just in time. New processors can be added as storage capacity is added, helping to meet demanding performance requirements. It eliminates a choke  © 2011, Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 
  6. 6. White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                                               6 point found in traditional scale‐up NAS, which creates an inherently highly available system. Added interface nodes contribute to the performance scalability, and performance and capacity scale independently.  SONAS is based on open architectures, which allows for faster time to innovation and reduced risk of lock‐in. It allows consolidation of multiple filers and their management and offers policy‐driven automated file placement and automated life cycle management and migration to tape. In general, it eliminates the management overhead normally found in scale‐up systems. That can let SONAS infrastructures reach petabyte scale and use automated data management. Clustered architecture is inherently highly available. SONAS uses a global namespace, which, when added to clustering, virtualizes the file storage environment and allows for much higher utilization rates in older‐style scale‐up environments. Those traditional NAS environments are also often weak on data protection and availability; SONAS supports those enterprise requirements with its remote replication, point‐in‐time copy, and multiple tiers of storage, all managed as a single instance within the global namespace. SONAS in Real Life: Financial Services Financial services organizations can reap benefits with scale‐out architectures like SONAS, particularly around consolidation for cost reduction and commercial HPC for business enablement. Financial services firms are often dealing with multi‐terabyte, if not petabyte, environments. SONASs file consolidation features can help increase utilization and add resources as a business grows. Managing data growth is an ongoing challenge for IT, and can be an easy way for CIOs to make an impact through reduced administrative costs and improved cycle times. New applications need a new approach for storage. Scale‐out technologies like SONAS provide a platform for consolidation, ease of use, and availability—all of which are essential for financial services firms and their users and customers.  Scale‐out NAS is a solid platform for enterprise applications like databases, ERP, data protection, and virtualization. Its more cost‐effective on several levels:  ! Just‐in‐time scalability: Clustered scale‐out systems can add capacity or performance resources as needed.  Theyre modular, but with dense storage capacity, so users can optimize floor space, power, and cooling.  ! Riding the commodity curve: As users defer purchases of frames, processors, or disks, they can benefit  from the ongoing decline in component prices over time.   ! Higher utilization rates: Virtualized infrastructure means that all storage in the system is addressable by all  nodes with the SONAS global namespace feature. So there arent any hard mappings and, therefore, no  stovepipes. Better utilization means deferred purchases of new capacity.    ! Management savings: A single point of management allows scale‐out NAS deployments that increase  capacity without adding IT headcount.    ! Faster provisioning: Adding processor nodes or new capacity to scale‐out systems is a fairly easy process— in most systems, it is a matter of plugging in the new resources and letting the system self balance  performance and capacity. It all adds up to operational and capital savings, as well as savings on cycle times, which make for better business agility. Scale‐out architectures like SONAS have major throughput advantages. Theyre efficient, but more than that, theyre an absolute requirement to support these new data types and applications. These advantages are compelling. But IBMs SONAS takes it a couple of steps further:  ! Massive scale thats powered by its Clustered Trivial Database (CTDB). Open‐source CTDB is the overall  system manager and that open‐source technology lets it cluster CIFS nodes without client‐side changes.  CTDB uses a large, distributed in‐memory database, combined with intelligent file locking, to eliminate  conflicts within the system.    © 2011, Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 
  7. 7. White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                                               7  ! Automated storage tiering across a broad class of performance tiers, including tape, for increased TCO.   SONAS is one of the few systems on the market today in which clients can take advantage of lower TCO  with automated life cycle management and migration to tape. Financial services firms often use commercial HPC applications like Monte Carlo simulations, which require high performance to run algorithms that calculate business risks. SONAS provides inherent advantages for these requirements. The SONAS operating system provides parallel data throughput, which is uniquely suited for high‐throughput environments. Financial analysis needs speed so data can be quickly fed into applications that perform simulations.  Better scale‐out technology has a direct impact on bottom line results in the form of faster trade execution and shorter business cycles. Traders can see upside potential, plus cut down on their exposure to downturns, with the near real‐time portfolio analysis that SONAS enables. Plus, enhanced firm performance means that analysts can act quickly, leading to faster, better decisions as well as millions of dollars in added profit. Scale‐out solutions like IBM SONAS can help financial service firms increase their number of daily trades through its optimized, balanced performance technologies. In addition to maximizing profitability, IBM SONAS can help shorten fraud detection time, thereby reducing firms’ exposure for security breaches.  SONAS in Real Life: Life Sciences Efficient storage infrastructures are key for life science workflows. Consolidation and flexibility can make users’ data much faster to access and more available in research situations. Using the modular architecture of SONAS adds deployment speed, which lets new capacity get provisioned, absorbed into the cluster, and put to work quickly. Storage can then be fully virtualized. Theres no need to re‐layout the LUNS, balance loads, or migrate data to optimize for new capacity. SONAS also adds flexibility for life sciences. It lets IT adjust the ratio of interface nodes to storage nodes so that tiers are denser and less expensive. SONAS also supports policy‐based geo‐clustering, which puts data closest to where its most often accessed, which can mitigate latency issues. The business impact of a scalable, flexible storage infrastructure is ever more important to life sciences, as bioinformatics efforts compile huge amounts of data. Bioinformatics aims to combine intense computing and analytics with scientific data to understand biological processes, such as the mapping of amino acid sequences, protein interactions, evolution modeling, or drug design and discovery.   Successful bioinformatics depends on speed—the faster users can perform analyses, the faster they can make discoveries for drugs, treatments, and more. That speed also helps life science workers rule out what doesnt work and achieve a better time to discovery to continually build and modify new theories. But the bandwidth bottleneck of traditional scale‐up NAS inhibits the movement of data to the analysis applications. The feeding of data is closely related to HPC performance and requires massive throughput. Using scale‐out NAS to solve that bottleneck could take 30‐60% off of processing time, according to statistics ESG has gathered in the field. Scale‐out goes beyond bandwidth scaling, too, to scale storage capacity in a way that keeps pace with storing scientists results. Other areas of life sciences, like medical imaging, are also moving into new platforms as they mature and expand. The images created by devices are very dense and contribute to increasingly huge data volumes in the industry. Electronic patient record systems add to that data and to the challenges of IT professionals in health care. One type of medical test—the computed tomography (CT)—generates 128 MB for a single patient study. Other tests, like radiography, mammograms, and MRIs, can lead to 20 TB of patient data a year in a large facility. And thats only the beginning, as pathology and cardiac applications mature and high‐definition scanning comes onto the horizon. Many of these organizations will look to scale‐out capabilities to keep this data under control. Managing at scale is what SONAS was designed to do. Storing those scientific data and medical images in a single scalable system is inherently more efficient than managing many storage stovepipes.  © 2011, Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 
  8. 8. White Paper: The Evolution of NAS in a Virtual IT World                                                                                               8 The Bigger Truth  Its not a matter of if, but when, organizations shift to scale‐out platforms—todays economics demand it. IT cant keep doing business the same old way, with data center waste coming from point product deployment and stovepiped infrastructures. Virtualization is helping solve some of those problems on the server side and products like SONAS help solve the storage side of the equation with its dynamic resource allocation and consolidation of file storage services.  The performance and throughput requirements of todays new application and data types are staggering compared to those of a decade ago. Older scale‐up systems cant support those requirements. But scale‐out NAS does, and goes further to help businesses thrive with high performance and availability.  The shift to scale‐out architectures is inevitable. Scale‐out is core to building virtualized, services‐oriented data centers and over time will replace scale‐up platforms that have become too rigid and expensive to scale and manage. They simply cant keep up. Services‐oriented architectures need flexibility. They need an architecture that can allocate resources where and when theyre needed, self‐tune and self‐balance, support geo‐distributed environments, and scale to petabytes in a single system image. IBMs SONAS meets those demands.                               © 2011, Enterprise Strategy Group, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 
  9. 9.                                                                                      20 Asylum Street  |  Milford, MA 01757  |  Tel:508.482.0188  Fax: 508.482.0128  |  www.enterprisestrategygroup.com  

×