Building private clouds on IBM Power systems

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Building private clouds on IBM Power systems

  1. 1. Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Bob Minns IBM Power Systems Team IBM SWG Competitive Project Office 512-286-7592 bobminns@us.ibm.com Last update: April 21, 2010
  2. 2. Table of ContentsTable of Contents.......................................................................................................................................... 2Executive Summary....................................................................................................................................... 3Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 4Requirements for a Private Cloud................................................................................................................. 5Building Blocks for a Private Cloud ............................................................................................................... 7 Tivoli Service Automation Manager (TSAM)............................................................................................. 7 VIO Server ................................................................................................................................................. 7 IBM Tivoli Monitoring ............................................................................................................................... 7 IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager .............................................................................................. 7IBM Power Systems for Private Clouds......................................................................................................... 8 Virtualization............................................................................................................................................. 8 Stability ..................................................................................................................................................... 8 Support...................................................................................................................................................... 8 Scalability .................................................................................................................................................. 8Using the Private Cloud................................................................................................................................. 9 Self-Service................................................................................................................................................ 9 Request a New Server............................................................................................................................. 10 Monitoring .............................................................................................................................................. 11 Flat Rate Charging ................................................................................................................................... 12Initial deployment of Private Clouds........................................................................................................... 15References .................................................................................................................................................. 16 Whitepapers............................................................................................................................................ 16 Product Information ............................................................................................................................... 16Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 2 of 17
  3. 3. Executive SummaryPrivate Cloud solutions enable IT organizations to respond to new and changing business requirementswhile maintaining control and maximizing the security. Using IBM Tivoli Service Management softwareand Power Systems, customers can implement a complete private cloud environment.Tivoli Service Automation Manager (TSAM) is a key software element to creating and managing a privatecloud environment. The automation provides a “set and forget” process for users of the private cloud.No one is waiting for the software to be copied to the disk and configured. Non-IT users can easilyrequest new virtual servers in the private cloud with the software stacks that they need, with noassistance from the IT staff and no knowledge of the environment. The “out of the box” integrationbetween Tivoli Service Automation Manager (TSAM), IBM Tivoli Monitoring (ITM) and Tivoli Usage andAccounting Manager (TUAM) products provides a complete end to end “private cloud” solution. The ITMagent for the virtual server can be installed and configured as part of the server request. This gives theoperations staff the instant visibility of any problems with the health of the virtual servers within theprivate cloud. The ITM agents for the VIO Server and CEC are configured with the VIO Server to providevisibility of the VIO Server and the underlying hardware platform. The complete environment is beingmonitored and managed as virtual servers are added to the private cloud.Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager (TUAM) provides the functionality for supporting pay-as-you-go orsubscription-based charges for the private cloud users. TUAM provides an easy way for users to viewtheir charges and correlate these charges to the resources that they are using within the private cloud.IBM Power Systems provide the industrial strength virtualization, stability, support and scalability tofully support a private cloud environment.Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 3 of 17
  4. 4. IntroductionThis paper is intended for customers planning to build private cloud solutions with IBM Power Systemsand Tivoli Service Management software. For some time, public cloud offerings have promoted theparadigm of cloud computing and its perceived lower costs to the business. Moreover, cloud computingpromises attributes such as flat rate charging, request driven provisioning and real-time deploymentallowing customers to respond to new and changing business requirements in a timely manner.What is usually ignored is the fact that it is possible to create a private cloud with all of these sameattributes within the existing IT organization at a lower cost1. A private cloud can be more aligned withthe needs of the business and a private cloud provides increased security because it is managed withinan internal, secure environment. Private clouds still give direct control to the end users for quicklyrequesting a fully-functioning solution stack on a new server and the added benefit to the customer ofhaving full control over the private cloud implementation.1 Whitepaper - Building a Dynamic Infrastructure with IBM Power Systems: A Closer Look at Private Cloud TCOBuilding Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 4 of 17
  5. 5. Requirements for a Private CloudThe success of a private cloud implementation within an IT organization is dependent on providing aservice to the internal business users at a competitive cost, compared to the public alternatives. Inorder to do so, a private cloud implementation leverages the following factors to reduce IT costs –Virtualization, Automation and Standardization. Automate Virtualize StandardizeFigure 1: Reducing IT Costs Using a Private CloudVirtualization allows multiple workloads to run on a single physical system, increasing the utilization ofthe physical hardware. This in turn reduces the number of physical systems required to run theseworkloads with savings in lower power, cooling and floor space costs as well as reduced softwarelicenses. Multiple workloads can be consolidated on to fewer, larger physical systems. Due to the natureof consolidation through virtualization one thing is intuitive: the larger the servers, the more workloadsit can be support and the more system resources can be shared between the workloads to improvephysical system utilization levels.Internal labor costs average 41% of the total IT expenses2. To significantly reduce overall costs, everyhour of labor must have as large an impact as possible. Automation helps eliminate repetitive tasks,provides consistent results and improves the service to the end users. There is a larger investment in thesetup of the automation but the payback is provided in each subsequent use of the automated process.2 AMR Research: 2009 Overall Operating Expense Budget – Overall Averageshttp://www.amrresearch.com/Content/View.aspx?CompURI=tcm:7-49849Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 5 of 17
  6. 6. Creating a limited number of standard software stacks reduces the number of differences betweenenvironments and reduces the labor required to create, support and maintain these software stacks.With fewer variations, there are fewer problems to resolve. Therefore, private cloud users expectservers with “golden” or “pre-tested” software stacks so they are using a software stack that has beencreated and tested elsewhere not a brand new combination of software with unknown problems.The following example shows just the time improvement by using virtualization, automation andstandardization to deploy a complete software stack. The manual install time assumes all the software isstaged ready for installation and the systems administrator is waiting for each step to complete beforeinitiating the next step. In reality, a systems administrator will kick off an installation step and thenreturn later to initiate the next stage of the installation. In contrast, it takes approximately 40 minutes todeploy a complete software stack (AIX V6, WAS V6, JEE application and the ITM agent) to a new virtualserver using TSAM (Tivoli Service Automation Manager) in our private cloud solution. In reality, no one iswaiting for the TSAM installation to complete. The private cloud user takes a few minutes to request anew server (a set and forget installation) via the portal and then later receives an email with the systempassword and related information once the new server is accessible via the network. It is completelyhands-off once the request is submitted. 250 200 Total Deployment Time 150 120 (minutes) 100 67% reduction 50 25 40 0 Manual Install Automated Install Submit a request then check later for an email No real waitingFigure 2: Relative Deployment TimesBuilding Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 6 of 17
  7. 7. Building Blocks for a Private CloudCustomers can easily build their own private cloud environment using IBM Power Systems and Tivoliservice management software. Tivoli Service Automation Manager (TSAM)TSAM provides the foundation for creating a private cloud within any enterprise. TSAM is the packagingof two mature Tivoli products – Tivoli Service Request Manager (TSRM) and Tivoli Provisioning Manager(TPM). TSRM provides the front-end while TPM provides the automated provisioning on the back-end.Additional workflows and integration are provided for managing private clouds as part of the TSAMproduct. VIO ServerThe Virtual I/O Server (part of the PowerVM virtualization support for IBM Power Systems) allows thenetwork and I/O to be virtualized for each virtual server. This allows the bandwidth of the physicalnetwork adapters and the fiber channel adapters to be shared by the virtual servers in the private cloud.The VIO Server will be running the ITM agent for the VIO Server for monitoring the health of the VIOServer as well as the ITM CEC agent for monitoring the underlying hardware platform. These two agentsare configured with the initial setup of VIO Server before the private cloud users start requestingservices. IBM Tivoli MonitoringThe operating system ITM agent can be installed and configured as part of the virtual server request.Operations staff can monitor the health of the virtual servers, the VIO Server and the host platformusing the Tivoli Enterprise Portal Server (TEPS) interface. The user is responsible for the installation ofthe Monitoring Agent by selecting the checkbox when requesting a new virtual server. The installation ofthe operating system ITM agent is a separate step which is performed after restoring the system image.TSAM will then configure the operating system ITM agent to communicate with the correct TivoliEnterprise Monitoring Server (TEMS) as part of this process. IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting ManagerTSAM can be configured to provide daily accounting files for the Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager(TUAM). TSAM provides 3 subscription based metrics – Server Hours, Memory Hours (in MBs) and CPUHours for pay-as-you-go chargeback. The TUAM Reporting Server can be accessed by the end user todisplay these metrics for specific months, specific dates, projects and virtual servers to track their usageof the private cloud.Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 7 of 17
  8. 8. IBM Power Systems for Private CloudsIBM Power Systems are an ideal platform for creating a private cloud. IBM Power Systems provide thenecessary system attributes to support a private cloud environment - industrial strength virtualization,stability, support and scalability. VirtualizationThe PowerVM virtualization is built-in to every system with the same capabilities across the entireproduct line. The virtualization is always on for any IBM Power System environment. As a customer, youcan focus on the applications you need for your business rather than having multiple vendors trying toresolve integration issues with the virtualization technology. StabilityThe private cloud can be used for lots of small applications. Individually, these applications may not be“mission critical” but as the number of applications increases and the size of the private cloud grows,you will need a robust and stable environment. Customers have enjoyed the reliability, availability andserviceability characteristics of IBM Power Systems for large “mission critical” applications and thesesame characteristics are now required for private clouds. The stability of IBM Power Systems has beenhighlighted in a number of third party customer surveys3. SupportThe complete software stack from the hardware to the IBM middleware is developed and supported byIBM. The hardware, firmware, virtualization support and operating system are tested together.Customers can run middleware and key applications from other vendors with the underlying operatingsystem, virtualization and hardware, fully supported by IBM. The single vendor approach is valuablebecause there will always be environment-specific issues that need to be resolved, and with a singlevendor providing support for your private cloud environment, any problems will be resolved quicker. ScalabilitySome applications in the development or the testing phase may not need a lot of system resources toget started and it is easy to stand up a complete environment using a private cloud. Over time, thenumber of users may suddenly increase due to demand or the time of year. For growth and scalability, itis reassuring that the system resources for a Power Systems virtual server can grow from a 1/10 CPU tothe entire system (possibly 256 CPUs with the newly announced high-end POWER7-based systems), ifrequired. These system resources can be added dynamically without interrupting the users or theworkload.3 ITIC: ITIC 2009 Global Server Hardware & Server OS Reliability Survey; July 2009http://itic-corp.com/blog/2009/07/itic-2009-global-server-hardware-server-os-reliability-survey-resultsBuilding Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 8 of 17
  9. 9. Using the Private Cloud Tivoli Enterprise Portal Server Operations Tivoli Usage and Reporting Accounting Server Manager Server Tivoli Enterprise Monitoring Server 3. Monitoring Accounting Data 4. Flat Rate Charging ITM 1. Self Service Agent 2. Request A New Server VIO Self Service Automated Server Portal Provisioning End User PowerVM Hypervisor Tivoli Service Automation Manager IBM Power Systems Private Cloud (Multiple Systems) System AdministratorFigure 3: Using the Private Cloud Self-ServiceTSAM V7.2 provides an easy to use Web 2.0 interface for non-IT users to request virtual servers. Thedifferent components of the interface are the frequent requests (create a project, add a server to anexisting project, remove a server and cancel a project), the status of submitted requests and the statusof the user’s projects.Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 9 of 17
  10. 10. Figure 4: Self Service Portal Request a New ServerThis is the panel for requesting a new server for an existing project (SOF Web Testing in this example).The end date can be specified (in this case, it is indefinite which could be changed at a later date). Thereare two standard software stacks for installation – SOF Investment and SOF Mortgage. These softwarestacks include the operating system (AIX V6.1), application server (WAS V6.1), and a JEE application. Theuser can also install and configure the ITM agent as part of the deployment of the virtual server byselecting the checkbox “Monitoring Agent to be installed”. Multiple servers with the same softwarestack and settings can be requested in a single request. The system resource settings for CPU, memoryand storage are the recommended settings that have been setup by the cloud administrator. The usercan still adjust these settings using the controls before submitting the request. In this case, we have asmall private cloud environment and TSAM is showing that 2 virtual servers are available with thisconfiguration and requested dates.Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 10 of 17
  11. 11. Figure 5: Request a New Server MonitoringIt is easy to determine what servers are being used for which projects just by selecting the individualprojects. The panel shows the virtual servers that are being used for the SOF Web Testing project –sofpw1 and sofpw2. The bright green button shows that the ITM agent is installed and configured,providing the statistics (for Memory, CPU and Disk) to the right of the Server Name. A virtual server canbe selected and the icons shown above the servers can be used for backing up the server, restoring aserver backup, removing a server, starting a server, stopping a server, restarting a server and resettingthe server password,Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 11 of 17
  12. 12. Figure 6: Monitoring Servers in a Project Flat Rate ChargingTUAM provides 4 levels for the Accounting Structure. The accounting structure can apply across theentire IT organization not just the “private cloud” environment. The accounting structure will varyslightly from customer to customer. For this example, we are highlighting the capabilities of subscriptionbased chargeback for the private cloud using the integration between TSAM and TUAM. Chargeback istypically to a financial entity (a department for our purposes) within the enterprise for each accountingperiod (month). The four levels here are Chargeback Department, Requestor, Deployment Instance (byTSAM Project) and the Virtual Server Name (Hostname).Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 12 of 17
  13. 13. Figure 7: Accounting Structure for ChargebackIn this example, the private cloud user can access the Reporting Server for TUAM to check theaccumulated private cloud charges for his entire department for the month of February. It is possible toalso view the breakdown of charges for the lower levels.Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 13 of 17
  14. 14. This invoice shows the monthly charges for the department (dept99) for our sample company. It showsthe flat rates for the 3 TSAM metrics – TSAM Server Hours, TSAM Memory (in MBs) Hours and TSAMCPU Hours. The charges for the month are the resource usage multiplied by the flat rates. With theTUAM reporting Server, it is possible to drill down within the invoice to show the breakdown of resourceusage by virtual server hostname. This helps resolve any disagreement between the charges for themonth and the resources used. The rates used are for example only. TUAM can also be used fordetermining the real cost of the computing resources in the private cloud to ensure that the ITDepartment is close to breaking even while providing realistic flat rates to the private cloud users.Figure 8: Invoice for Private Cloud ChargesBuilding Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 14 of 17
  15. 15. Initial deployment of Private CloudsAs with any new technology, confidence is gained by introducing on a small scale and expanding its useas more experience and skills are acquired. The resources in a private cloud can be automaticallyprovisioned as well as de-provisioned. This lends the best usage of private clouds to smaller, less criticalapplication environments that need computing resources for short or fixed periods of time. The addedbenefit on the back-end of the project is that the computing resources can just as quickly be released,maximizing the reuse of the available computing resources for other projects. An ideal environment forintroducing private clouds is development or test environments that need resources for short periods oftime to test new levels of software before full deployment in a production, mission critical or qualityassurance (QA) environment.Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 15 of 17
  16. 16. References WhitepapersBuilding a Dynamic Infrastructure with IBM Power Systems: A closer Look at private Cloud TCO ftp://submit.boulder.ibm.com/sales/ssi/sa/wh/n/pow03043usen/POW03043USEN.PDF Product InformationTivoli Service Automation Manager – Product Website http://www.ibm.com/software/tivoli/products/service-auto-mgr/IBM Tivoli Monitoring – Product Website http://www.ibm.com/software/tivoli/products/monitor/IBM Tivoli Usage and Accounting Manager – Product Website http://www.ibm.com/software/tivoli/products/usage-accounting/IBM Power Systems – Product Website http://www.ibm.com/systems/power/Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 16 of 17
  17. 17. © Copyright IBM Corporation 2010IBM CorporationSoftware GroupRoute 100Somers, NY10589USAProduced in the United StatesApril 2010All Rights ReservedIBM, the IBM logo, DB2, Tivoli, WebSphere, AIX, Power Systems and PowerVM are trademarks or registered trademarksof International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both.Java and all Java-based trademarks are trademarks of Sun Microsystems, Inc. in the United States, other countries,or both.Other company, product or service names may be trademarks or service marks of others.The information contained in this documentation is provided for informational purposes only. While efforts were madeto verify the completeness and accuracy of the information contained in this documentation, it is provided “as is”without warranty of any kind, express or implied. In addition, this information is based on IBM’s current product plansand strategy, which are subject to change by IBM without notice. IBM shall not be responsible for any damagesarising out of the use of, or otherwise related to, this documentation or any other documentation. Nothing contained inthis documentation is intended to, nor shall have the effect of, creating any warranties or representations from IBM (orits suppliers or licensors), or altering the terms and conditions of the applicable license agreement governing the useof IBM software.References in these materials to IBM products, programs, or services do not imply that they will be available in allcountries in which IBM operates. Product release dates and/or capabilities referenced in these materials may changeat any time at IBM’s sole discretion based on market opportunities or other factors, and are not intended to be acommitment to future product or feature availability in any way.Building Private Clouds on IBM Power Systems Page 17 of 17

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