Trading or Sharing? Emergingopportunities and challenges for cross-border higher education         IAU 13th General Confer...
Cross-Border Higher Education:“. . . forms of education that areprovided by one country in another –and situations where s...
Models of Cross-Border Education•   Franchising of programmes•   Distance education•   Joint and dual degree programmes•  ...
Reasons for providing countries and     HEIs to offer HE abroad:•   To attract highly skilled workers•   To reach new mark...
Reasons for host countries and HEIs toallow foreign programmes being offered            in their country:• Stem study abro...
Directions of Cross-Border HE:•   North to South (vast majority)•   Developed to developed (e.g. Charles    Sturt Universi...
Current Trends in Cross-Border HE:•   Increasing government awareness and    policy development•   Developing countries: e...
The future of Cross-Border HE?• Cross-border HE is likely to grow, but also likely to  change in form.• Emerging markets (...
Issues Arising: Quality Assurance• There is a need for better qa mechanisms and  recognition of international qualificatio...
Collaboration vs. Competition• How can you ensure that cross-border HE is undertaken  in partnership, even if competition ...
Sustainability• Are the goals of equity and capacity  building being replaced in favour of  revenue generation?• Argument:...
Equal Partnership or Colonisation? • Is Cross-Border Higher Education   a new form of colonisation?  (J. Currie, A. Hickli...
Equal Partnership or Colonisation? The University of Washington’s motto:  “To learn more than we teach,  and leave more th...
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Utrecht sb- rosa becker

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Utrecht sb- rosa becker

  1. 1. Trading or Sharing? Emergingopportunities and challenges for cross-border higher education IAU 13th General Conference Utrecht, 17 July 2008 Dr Rosa Becker Senior Researcher The Observatory on Borderless Higher Education
  2. 2. Cross-Border Higher Education:“. . . forms of education that areprovided by one country in another –and situations where students enrol inhigher education abroad”.
  3. 3. Models of Cross-Border Education• Franchising of programmes• Distance education• Joint and dual degree programmes• International branch campuses• Foreign-backed universities © The Observatory on Borderless Higher Education
  4. 4. Reasons for providing countries and HEIs to offer HE abroad:• To attract highly skilled workers• To reach new markets & students• Revenue generation• To increase mutual understanding• Internationalisation of the institution• To strengthen their international reputation
  5. 5. Reasons for host countries and HEIs toallow foreign programmes being offered in their country:• Stem study abroad rates• Contribution to local capacity building and quality improvement• Stimulate the local economy• Attract international students• Develop research & development co-operation
  6. 6. Directions of Cross-Border HE:• North to South (vast majority)• Developed to developed (e.g. Charles Sturt University (AUS) in Canada, Carnegie Mellon (US) in Australia)• South to South (e.g. India and China in Africa)• South to North (e.g. Indian and Pakistani universities in the UAE) © The Observatory on Borderless Higher Education
  7. 7. Current Trends in Cross-Border HE:• Increasing government awareness and policy development• Developing countries: emerging sources for cross-border provision, regionally & beyond• Development of international HE ‘hubs’ (UAE, Malaysia, Singapore, Hong Kong)• Institutions more aware of cost and risk – entering into public/private partnerships, and consortia with HEIs and government. © The Observatory on Borderless Higher Education
  8. 8. The future of Cross-Border HE?• Cross-border HE is likely to grow, but also likely to change in form.• Emerging markets (Vietnam & Middle East): more students may take part in cross-border HE.• More mature markets (Singapore, Malaysia, Hong Kong): the nr of students in CBHE may decline due to larger scale and better quality of local HE supply.• Instead of building capacity through cheap and low- status foreign programmes, governments in mature markets are squeezing out many TNE programmes, and encouraging smaller-scale, but higher status, campuses of prestigious foreign universities. Source: G. McBurnie & C. Ziguras (2007)Transnational Education; The Observatory on Borderless Higher Education (2006) The International Branch Campus
  9. 9. Issues Arising: Quality Assurance• There is a need for better qa mechanisms and recognition of international qualifications• QA agencies are paying increasing attention to universities operating abroad• But: how can countries/institutions best ensure the quality of overseas programmes?• For HEIs, it is important to integrate qa procedures for overseas provision within institutional qa system• In some countries, a less bureaucratic and stifling quality assessment approach may be needed as more universities are experiencing in creative ways with overseas provision
  10. 10. Collaboration vs. Competition• How can you ensure that cross-border HE is undertaken in partnership, even if competition is the driving force?• It is crucial to choose the right partners.• International partners with similar aims and values may help both institutions to gain market share in the global HE market.• Some partners will want to extract what they can from others, to benefit from others’ strengths in S&T. There are considerable risks involved in developing international collaborations, and if universities do not do their homework properly, their partners may be capable of gaining more from the ‘partnerships’ than they do.
  11. 11. Sustainability• Are the goals of equity and capacity building being replaced in favour of revenue generation?• Argument: for partnerships to be sustainable, they can not be purely focused on revenue generation. There must be real quality provision and a degree of mutual benefit.
  12. 12. Equal Partnership or Colonisation? • Is Cross-Border Higher Education a new form of colonisation? (J. Currie, A. Hickling-Hudson, G. Steiner Khamsi)
  13. 13. Equal Partnership or Colonisation? The University of Washington’s motto: “To learn more than we teach, and leave more than we take”

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