Utrecht sa- piyushi kotecha

562 views

Published on

Published in: Business
0 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
562
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Utrecht sa- piyushi kotecha

  1. 1. PPPs in HE & Southern African Regional Development • What conditions are necessary to ensure that  partnerships between public higher education and  the private sector provide opportunities for mutual  benefit? • Context counts when answering this question: in the  SADC region, turn‐key PPPs in HE are needed to  foster sectoral development to the benefit of  broader social and economic advancementPiyushi KotechaChief Executive Officer,SARUA
  2. 2. Specifying the rationale for PPPs in Southern African HE • While the general rationale for PPPs fits – Leverage private investment – Tap partners’ strengths to optimise roles/responsibilities/risks – Match service delivery to market needs – Stimulate innovation/entrepreneurship/growth • It must be tailored for PPPs in HE in Southern Africa – Often constrained public and private capacity  capacity development must  be part of PPPs – Development imperatives arise from a globalising world and from African  social conditions  PPPs must respond to both – A backdrop of chronic under‐development, under‐investment, poor planning,  poor social conditions, weak resource base affecting the region and HE  countries must both redress the consequences and ‘accelerate the catch‐up’ – Massive public and private investment needed to revitalise HE as a driver of  regional development  governments and markets must work togetherPiyushi Kotecha
  3. 3. The nature of mutual benefit in PPP’s in Southern Africa • Partnerships between governments, HE and industry  can jointly mobilise the resources required for  interlinked and knowledge‐based social  development and economic growth • PPPs in HE should reinforce and not dilute the  relevance and responsiveness of universities to their  societies, polities and economies • PPPs should keep primarily in view the public good  rather than private interests: HE promotes a critical  citizenry, growth and development, the  consolidation of social justicePiyushi Kotecha
  4. 4. Framing an approach for PPPs in Southern African HE 1. Regional role players must give focused attention to PPPs’ potential for  fast‐tracking key developmental interventions in both national and multi‐ country contexts 2. Engagement between government, HE and industry must be  comprehensive, multi‐layer, sustained, iterative – and there must be  feedback loops between local, national and regional (AU, NEPAD, SADC)  layers 3. Guiding frameworks for PPPs must be generated from available sources  (e.g. case studies, comparative multi‐country research, national policies,  incentive schemes and guidelines) for systemic SADC responses 4. Important lessons and good practice must be captured and disseminated  via capacity development networks (e.g. SARUA, AAU), to inform  overarching policy frameworks and replication across the regionPiyushi Kotecha
  5. 5. Framing an Approach, cont. 5. Priority areas for viable PPPs in HE in the region must be  identified • Nature – e.g. policy, infrastructural and capacity development initiatives • Focus – e.g. HE quality, ICTs, S&T and innovation, HIV/AIDS, good governance • Modes – e.g. infrastructure provision; contracting for delivery; private  management of public facilities; partnerships/affiliations for teaching,  curriculum development, research and innovation, QA • Criteria – e.g. “mutual benefit” as defined, regional priorities, stakeholder  engagement and agreement (and case‐specific) • NB: targeted, large‐scale PPP interventions recommended to both capacitate  HE’s contribution to social development and integrate HE with the global  knowledge economy – e.g. substantial infrastructure provision and extensive  knowledge networksPiyushi Kotecha
  6. 6. Checking the proposed rationale/approach for PPPs in Southern African HE • Existing examples of PPPs in Southern African HE  provide some lessons, validations and warnings – Botswana International University of Science and Technology (BIUST) – Knowledge networks in South Africa – Inter‐institutional PPPs in South African distance education – ICT infrastructure provisions and partnerships in AfricaPiyushi Kotecha
  7. 7. Case study 1: Botswana International University of Science & Technology • Second national university on fast‐track development since 2005: first  enrolments 2010, 10 000 students envisaged by 2016 – S&T institutional  mission supports regional and national priorities for socio‐economic  development • PPP opportunities (DFBO) explicitly sought by government ‐ in line with  national privatisation policies (and public procurement regulations  followed) • PPP sought to access innovation and project management strength, and  to share market risk – government remains committed to financing capital  shortages • Transaction advisory services used – effective planning and procurement,  knowledge transfer and capacity development for implementation team  built into projectPiyushi Kotecha
  8. 8. Knowledge networks in South Africa • Innovation PPPs fostered by government incentives (THRIP,  Innovation Fund) – moving beyond ad hoc consultancy and  contracting for financial benefit, to systemic gains • Knowledge networks successfully emerging in e.g.  biotechnology, ICT and new materials development – as  linked to national priorities for competitive economic growth • Knowledge networks contributing to centres of research  excellence – basic research capability strengthened, not  weakened • Potential modality for comparable activities in other SADC  countries, or for multi‐country knowledge networks, is being  modelledPiyushi Kotecha
  9. 9. Inter-institutional PPPs in South African distance education• Collaborative arrangements sprang up between public and private  providers in the distance education arena, 1994‐2002 (especially  service and tuition partnerships) – pre‐empted national QA  dispensation and national HE restructuring plan• South Africa followed international trends around private HE growth  and inter‐institutional PPPs – but unintended consequences followed  in the absence of a proper policy interface (e.g. perpetuation of  institutional historical advantage via market initiative, geographically  skewed access to HE, uneven HE quality)• SA government set curbs on these PPPs in 2002 via re‐accreditation  requirements and funding determinations – linkage to national  imperatives is a key condition for successful inter‐institutional and  other PPPsPiyushi Kotecha
  10. 10. ICT infrastructure provision and partnerships in Africa • African universities have prioritised the integration of ICTs into teaching, research  and management and the AAU is tasked with co‐ordinating the many initiatives  under way – this is a critical, but not an easy task • There is intense partnership activity in ICTs in African HE, involving different kinds  of partners and arrangements – Pan‐African E‐network for telemedicine and tele‐education in 53 African countries: joint initiative of  Indian Government and African Union, also supports Indian goals for trade relations with Africa – AfriHub Nigeria ‘ICT parks’ use PPP arrangements to support government/HE sector reform policies  in Nigerian federal universities, while involving institutional exclusivity agreements with AfriHub for  at least 5 years – Projects to access low‐cost bandwidth in South Africa involve apparently rival public networks  (SANReN and TENET) and private providers (e.g. Telkom, Seacom) • Small sample illustrates the dangers of competing/cross‐cutting/duplicate  initiatives in a commercially lucrative arena – also flagging the necessity for  rigorous evaluation of the conditions for PPPs in the framework of regional and  national policies and prioritiesPiyushi Kotecha
  11. 11. Conclusion • PPPs in Southern African HE should be developed from a  current experimental base in particular countries  a  comprehensive means of fostering sectoral development for  accelerated social and economic advancement in the SADC  region • This requires – Identification of targeted, large‐scale and fast‐tracked PPPs at national and  regional levels – Appropriate feedback loops between the two levels to ensure the generation  of guiding frameworks and good practice models for PPP implementation • PPPs in HE have high potential for HE and regional  development in the SADC region ‐ provided they occur in a co‐ ordinated way in line with regional prioritiesPiyushi KotechaChief Executive Officer,SARUA

×