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Sijbolt noorda

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Sijbolt noorda

  1. 1. Social Innovation: the impact of Higher Education, how can it be measured and monitored? Montréal 2015 Sijbolt Noorda President Magna Charta Observatory
  2. 2. • The Magna Charta Observatory of Fundamental University Values and Rights is a non-profit organisation based on the Magna Charta declaration of 1988, founded by the University of Bologna and the Council of European rectors, now associated with EUA and IAU • from its beginnings it wished to become a worldwide program and project
  3. 3. 776 signatories from 81 countries
  4. 4. ‘ The university is an autonomous institution at the heart of societies differently organized because of geography and historical heritage; it produces, examines, appraises and hands down culture by research and teaching. To meet the needs of the world around it, its research and teaching must be morally and intellectually independent of all political authority and economic power.’ [from Magna Charta Universitatum]
  5. 5. what shall we do in this workshop? • we’ll talk and think about the impact of HEIs on social innovation • and the ways in which this is being measured and monitored • at both ends of the line, in society as well as in HEIs • higher education not as end in itself, but rather as part of a chain of experiences and developments in society
  6. 6. function public / private good benefits value purpose impact assessment markets effect relevance use significance mission accountability trust usefulness performance quality
  7. 7. what’s the concept? • impact has become a popular concept to express the value of higher education and research for its users. • It is not a new concept. Although the term “impact” is a relative newcomer to Higher Education policy speak, the realities it refers to are perennial. Terminology may vary (value, purpose, effect, relevance) the issue is a constant. • And rightly so. Universities are no l’art pour l’art workshops and they never were meant to be. Even at times when they served society through elites.
  8. 8. what’s new? • the novelty is not in the issue but in the realities and attitudes • responsive universities (or rather: any HEI) must constantly read their map and re-position themselves to optimize their value • yet, ‘value creation’ cannot be a one-way-street; the product of HE is way too complicated for just a delivery mode • so society – businesses as well as not-for-profits, government as well as students – should get involved rather than just receive (in the customer mode)
  9. 9. current focus • In the case of social innovation higher education’s impact happens along a broad variety of lines and programs • via teaching & learning as well as research & valorisation • by way of attitudes & culture as well as concrete projects & solutions
  10. 10. the challenge of measuring and monitoring • To know what we’re doing and what works and what doesn’t we must monitor impact and be accountable • How to do justice to it in qualitative terms as well as in quantitative terms?
  11. 11. if not quantifiable it doesn’t count • admissions & recruitments • ranking lists & reputation scores • performance indicators • bibliometrics, including impact scores • financial figures • awards & grants • patents & licenses, et cetera
  12. 12. the qualitative value of multiple virtues • public trust  reliable, civil, undisguised [overall impression] • student satisfaction  inspiring, competent, well-suited [educational experience] • partner confidence  sustainable, dedicated, efficient [academic and business performance]
  13. 13.  impact? not uncomplicated •  what a university must do to make a strong impression on its users, partners, regulators and/or funders is not a single and simple issue • but rather a mix of accountability, market performance and trust generation by a broad variety of activities and qualities, involving many actors and institutes, requiring shared values and common attitudes & professional achievements all over the place
  14. 14. what is going on in society that (re-)defines the role of HEIs? • growing complexities & social dynamics • trust crisis & quest for integrity, transparency, openness and accountability • grand challenges requiring new ways of multidisciplinary thinking • globalization, culture blending & parochialism • increasing competition & volatility • et cetera
  15. 15. what shall we do in this workshop? • we’ll talk and think about the impact of HEIs on social innovation • and the ways in which this is being measured and monitored • at both ends of the line, in society as well as in HEIs • higher education not as end in itself, but rather as part of a chain of experiences and developments in society

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