Jamuna Vadivelu

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Jamuna Vadivelu

  1. 1. Education for Sustainable Development: The Medical Paradigm PROFESSOR DR JAMUNA VADIVELU HEAD, MERDU FACULTY OF MEDICINE UNIVERSITY OF MALAYA
  2. 2. Introduction • Education for health can profoundly influence sustainable development in terms of human welfare and lifestyle. • Mankind cannot achieve sustainable development when there are recurrent chronic diseases. • Mankind cannot maintain their population without a reactive health care system and healthy lifestyle.
  3. 3. THE MBBS CURRICULUM FIVE YEAR COURSE THREE PHASES THREE STRANDS
  4. 4. MBBS Curriculum in University of Malaya • Content of the medical course is divided into three main strands. THE SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF DISEASE MBBS PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT DOCTOR,PATIENT, HEALTH AND SOCIETY (DPHS)
  5. 5. PHASE OF STUDY SCIENTIFIC BASIS DOCTOR, PATIENT HEALTH AND SOCIETY (DPHS) PERSONAL AND PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (PPD) Phase I Normal Human Body & Its Function (52 weeks) Core And Systems Community Medicine Behavioural Science Communication Skills Community Family Case Studies (CFCS) Attitude, Character and Ethics (ACE) Management Electives Phase II Body’s Reaction to Injury (52 weeks) Phase III Practice-Based Medicine (142 weeks)
  6. 6. MBBS Curriculum Timeline Phase I The Normal Human Body and its Function Phase II The Body’s Reaction to Injury Phase IIIA CLINICAL POSTINGS Phase IIIB CLINICAL POSTINGS Phase IIIB CLINICAL POSTINGS YR 1 YR 2 YR 3 YR 4 YR 5 Introduction to clinical practice Phase Two Elective Phase Three A Elective
  7. 7. New Integrated Curriculum: Elective Programme • Phase Two Elective • Enable students to learn skills and knowledge that is not in the formal curriculum • Improve student interaction with patient and community
  8. 8. Elective programme: The past • Aimed to study the impact of health on human population. • Projects were inflexibly structured within the formal curriculum. • Lack of diverse approaches in the understanding of medicine from a traditional viewpoint.
  9. 9. Traditional and complementary medicine (T&CM) in Malaysia • Multi-cultural society consisting of Malays (and indigenous people), Chinese and Indians. • T&CM is deeply embedded in the respective cultures and influences their health care practices. • Ministry of Health (MOH) formed the Traditional and Complementary Medicine Division (T&CMD) in 2004 to ensure highly regulated qualified practices.
  10. 10. Elective programme: New policy • 2012: the elective programme was restructured to • Broaden students’ perspective in dynamic changes in healthcare without prejudice. • Aimed at medical students to value and affirm their traditional knowledge in health advocacy.
  11. 11. Elective programme: New policy • Grouping: Five to six students per group • 43 groups (2012) • 34 groups (2013) • In 2013, each group consisted of members from different races and genders.
  12. 12. Elective programme: New policy • Each group was free to choose their research interests and was advised to look for preferable and appropriate supervisors. • E-learning platform provided guidelines: Writing proposal Project presentation Report Ethics application
  13. 13. Elective programme: New policy • Students presented their oral or poster presentations by the end of the elective programme. • Student organised the event: • Monitored by two faculty coordinators. Logistics Tables, chairs, poster boards etc Equipment Projector, public address system etc Programme events Presentation orders, flow etc Session moderators & judges
  14. 14. Assessment • Two different rubrics were developed to evaluate oral and poster presentations.
  15. 15. Assessment: Poster presentation • Poster presentation assessed two major aspects • Total: 40 marks Poster Aspect (30 marks) a. Organisation b. Design c. Content Oral Aspect (10 marks) a. Presenters’ personal styles b. Delivery c. Timing
  16. 16. Assessment: Oral presentation • Oral presentation assessed two major aspects: • Total: 40 marks Power Point Aspect (30 marks) a. Story board b. Design c. Content d. Evidence of learning Oral Aspect (10 marks) a. Presenters’ personal styles b. Delivery c. Timing
  17. 17. Assessment: Based on additional presentation methods • Students’ oral presentations may have included: • Separate rubrics were designed. Brochures Live demonstrations Sketches
  18. 18. Assessment: Results • 2012: • Students’ mean was 30.2/40.0 (SD=3.2). • 2013: • Students’ mean was 29.5/40.0 (SD=2.5).
  19. 19. Examples of projects • Acupuncture: concepts and benefits • Efficacy of foot reflexology as an alternative medicine • Quranic verses: secrets of healing • Solat from medical perspective (Poster) • Modern Qigong and its benefits • T’ai Chi and its benefits to our health (Video) • How Yoga affects the psychological aspects of the practitioners
  20. 20. Discussion: Key to successes • As the event organisers, students adopted independency. • The process of organising this event helped students in developing sense of belonging
  21. 21. Discussion: Key to successes • One of the key successes was learner autonomy. • Students were free to choose their project topics and select their desirable supervisors. • Students seemed to truly enjoy the experience in • video production • field work
  22. 22. Discussion: Key to successes • Learner autonomy does not mean students to be left on their own. • The programme would not have been successfully conducted without a close monitoring from the two faculty coordinators.
  23. 23. Discussion: Areas for improvements • Some students still chose to research into clinical sciences: • Influenced by their supervisors in deciding the project title, or • Students have no originality in opinions • Unless students recognise the importance of T&CM, they would not choose to explore T&CM.
  24. 24. Conclusion • Through practicing learner autonomy, medical students became active learners. • Students learnt multicultural interchanges, leadership and teamwork, sharing of resources and research skills. • This policy could be seen as a starting point for students to develop interest in balancing uses of both modern health science and T&CM in sustaining desirable human lifestyle.
  25. 25. End -Thank you Medical Education & Research Development Unit (MERDU), Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Malaysia. Dean Deputy Dean Head MERDU Academic, administrative & support staff

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