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Hunter Public Relations 2016 Food News Study Summary Report

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The 14th Annual Food News Study, commissioned by Hunter Public Relations, examined the top food stories of 2016 in terms of general awareness and concern. The study also explored how food news stories influence consumer behavior and the top media sources for food information - broken out by recipes, general food news and nutrition.

Please visit us at www.hunterpr.com/our-pov/foodstudy.html to learn more.

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Hunter Public Relations 2016 Food News Study Summary Report

  1. 1. ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting SUMMARY REPORT in partnership with Libran Consulting 2016 FOOD NEWS STUDY
  2. 2. Background/Objectives/Methodology Top Food Stories of the Year Where Americans Get their Food Information Demographics 3 5 21 30 TABLE OF CONTENTS ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 2
  3. 3. For fourteen years, Hunter PR has conducted its Annual Food News Study. This food study highlights the top food stories of the past year according to the opinion of Americans, and identifies the potential impact of that news on behavior. This year’s report continues that tradition, as well as: Providing an understanding of how important food stories overall are to Americans; Measuring any change in interest in food stories overall; Uncovering what Americans consider to be the top food and beverage item of the year, and; Determining what media sources are used for gaining information on food news, nutrition, and recipes. BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES 3©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting
  4. 4. A quantitative online survey was conducted among a sample of N=1,046 American adults. The survey was sent to a sample balanced to the US Census on age, race and region by sample provider ResearchNow, with quotas set for even representation by gender. The study was 15 minutes in length, and in field from October 24th – 28th, 2016. Questions covered in the study included: • Top stories of 2016; • Behavior changes due to 2016 news stories; • Sources for recipe information, nutrition information and sources of general food news; The vast majority of these respondents (82%) do the cooking and food shopping in their household. The vast majority (87%) also makes the decision on where to dine when eating out. We have reviewed this data by key demographic group, including Millennials, Gen Xers, Baby Boomers and Matures. METHODOLOGY • Trustworthiness of food sources; • Media usage; and • Social media usage. 4©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting
  5. 5. ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 5 TOP FOOD STORIES OF THE YEAR TOP FOOD STORIES OF THE YEAR
  6. 6. Hispanics are more likely to find these stories to be important than are non-Hispanics (50% T2B vs. 39%), as are HHs w/children (52% vs. 36% no child HHs). More than one-quarter of Americans this year feel that food & nutrition stories are very important, a decline vs. 2015. Four in ten believe they are more important than other news stories, also a decline vs. last year (but back to 2014’s level of importance). Importance of Food Stories IMPORTANCE OF FOOD & NUTRITION STORIES IMPORTANCE VERSUS OTHER NEWS STORIES 50% Important 26% Very important 12% Much more important 41% 28% Somewhat more important 9% Somewhat less important 44% No more or less important 19% Not very important 4% Not at all important 7% Much less important2015: 45% 2015: 30% Q.7: In general how important are food and nutrition stories to you? Q.8: And during 2016 how important were food and nutrition stories compared to other stories in the news? N=1,046 6 (4) (3) (2) (1) ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting
  7. 7. Importance of Food Stories IMPORTANCE OF FOOD NEWS STORIES 81% 75% 75% 66% 19% 25% 25% 34% Millennials Baby Boomers MaturesGen X Millennials report a higher level of importance with this year’s food stories as compared to Matures. Relative to other news stories, Millennials are more likely than other age cohorts to believe food news stories are important. Conversely, Matures are more cynical regarding this year’s food stories, rating them as less important than other cohorts. Top 2 Box (Very Important/ Important) Bottom 2 Box (Not Very/ Not at all important) Top 2 Box (Much more/ somewhat more important) Bottom 2 Box (Much less/ somewhat less important) IMPORTANCE VS. OTHER NEWS STORIES 49% 40% 34% 29% 11% 14% 17% 30% Millennials Baby Boomers MaturesGen X Q.7: In general how important are food and nutrition stories to you? Q.8: And during 2016 how important were food and nutrition stories compared to other stories in the news? N=1,046 7©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting
  8. 8. 8©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting Important Food Topics Topics of Food Safety and Food Nutrition continue to be most important to Americans. However, versus last year, fewer Americans are naming food safety as a most important topic (53% vs. 63% 2015). Older Americans view food safety and nutrition as being quite important. But vs. older generations, Millennials place more importance on the environment and the “entertainment” value of food. Food Safety Food Nutrition Food & the Environment Food Sourcing Food Convenience Popular Food/Flavor Trends Food Innovation Food & Pop Culture Food Marketing/Sales Promotion Celebrity Food Stories None of these 53% 47% 16% 13% 10% 8% 7% 4% 4% 2% 10% Q.9B: Out of the following food areas or topics which are most important to you? Please check up to two. N=1,046 a,b,c,d significant difference at 95% confidence level. MILLENNIALS (N=401) A BABY BOOMERS (N=306) C MATURES (N=94) D GEN X (N=245) B Food Safety Food Nutrition Food & the Environment Popular Food/Flavor Trends Food Innovation Food & Pop Culture Celebrity Food Stories None of these 40% 44% 19% 11% 9% 7% 4% 10% D D C CD CD D 53% 40% 15% 7% 7% 5% 2% 15% A CD CD 64% 53% 16% 7% 4% 1% 1% 8% 69% 50% 11% 3% 5% 1% 0% 4% AB AB AB
  9. 9. 9©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting Top 2016 Food Stories The top food stories of 2016 are the Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak, Honey Bee Decline, Listeria Outbreak and the GMO Labeling Bill. These top stories reveal consumer concerns with the safety and healthfulness of the food they are eating, as well as environmental concerns. Honey Bee Decline returns to our list this year, after also holding a #2 spot in 2014. Listeria Outbreaks associated with Blue Bell ice cream was also a top story last year. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 CHIPOTLE RECOVERY AFTER E. COLI OUTBREAK HONEY BEE DECLINE LISTERIA OUTBREAKS GMO LABELING BILL NO TIP POLICY AT RESTAURANTS POKEMON GO AT RESTAURANTS FDA TO REDEFINE “HEALTHY” CLEAN EATING & LABELING FDA APPROVES NUTRITION PANEL THAT HIGHLIGHTS SUGAR SUGAR INDUSTRY POINTED BLAME AT FAT 39% 33% 25% 21% 18% 16% 14% 14% 13% 13% 11% 10% 10% 8% 7% 7% 6% 5% 3% 2% 3% Q.3: ..TOP 3 FOOD STORIES of 2016 N=1,046 FOOD DELIVERY SERVICES SKITTLES CONVERSATION AROUND ELECTION COLD BREW COFFEE AMERICA'S OBSESSION WITH DONUTS OFF-MENU ORDERING DIET PEPSI BRINGS BACK ASPARTAME POPULARITY OF TURMERIC FOOD TAKES STAGE AT AWARDS SHOWS CANNED WINE TUNA POKE TREND ANOTHER STORY Entries included Home Delivery Kits (such as Blue Apron), Restaurants not serving police officers, Avocados, Drug use and the Election.
  10. 10. 10©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting Top 2016 Food Stories Top stories are similar across age cohorts, with Chipotle’s Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak topping the list for most ages. Only Millennials included Pokemon Go at Restaurants as a top food story. Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak 37% Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak 37% Honey Bee Decline 44% Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak 43% Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak 36% Honey Bee Decline 30% Honey Bee Decline 26% Honey Bee Decline 42% Pokemon Go at Restaurants 23% Listeria Outbreaks 24% Listeria Outbreaks 32% Listeria Outbreaks 33% 1 2 3 MILLENNIALS (N=401) BABY BOOMERS (N=306) MATURES (N=94) GEN X (N=245) Q.3: ..TOP 3 FOOD STORIES of 2016 N=1,046
  11. 11. ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 11 This year we see considerable consistency with the top food stories across geographic regions. One notable difference is in the Northeast, where No Tip Policy at Restaurants hits their top three stories. Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak 35% Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak 46% Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak 34% Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak 41% Honey Bee Decline 32% Honey Bee Decline 39% Honey Bee Decline 27% No Tip Policy At Restaurants 26% Honey Bee Decline 34% Listeria Outbreaks 23% Listeria Outbreaks 28% Listeria Outbreaks 25% 1 2 3 NORTHEAST (N=175) WEST (N=244) SOUTH (N=394) MIDWEST (N=233) Q.3: ...TOP 3 FOOD STORIES of 2016 N=1,046 Top 2016 Food Stories
  12. 12. 12©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting Top stories are the same across Hispanic/Non-Hispanic groups as well as gender, although men give more importance to the Honey Bee Decline than do women. Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak 35% Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak 39% Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak 41% Honey Bee Decline 37% Honey Bee Decline 30% Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak 36% Honey Bee Decline 24% Listeria Outbreaks 22% Honey Bee Decline 35% Listeria Outbreaks 26% Listeria Outbreaks 27% Listeria Outbreaks 24% 1 2 3 HISPANICS MALE (N=522) FEMALE (N=524) NON-HISPANICS Q.3: ...TOP 3 FOOD STORIES of 2016 N=1,046 Top 2016 Food Stories
  13. 13. 13©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting Behavior Changes by Story This year more than half of Americans are taking action as a result of the food stories presented in the media. While they are most likely to have been impacted by our top two food stories of the year, Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak and Listeria Outbreaks, a notable minority made a behavior change due to the media’s coverage of Clean Eating & Labeling and the GMO Labeling Bill. 24% 17% 13% 11% 9% 9% 8% 8% 7% 6% 6% 6% 6% 5% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 2% 2% 45% CLEAN EATING & LABELING GMO LABELING BILL FDA TO REDEFINE "HEALTHY" SUGAR INDUSTRY POINTED BLAME AT FAT FDA APPROVES NUTRITION PANEL THAT HIGHLIGHTS SUGAR HONEY BEE DECLINE FOOD DELIVERY SERVICES NO TIP POLICY AT RESTAURANTS COLD BREW COFFEE DIET PEPSI BRINGS BACK ASPARTAME OFF-MENU ORDERING POKEMON GO AT RESTAURANTS POPULARITY OF TURMERIC AMERICA'S OBSESSION WITH DONUTS A STORY NOT LISTED HERE CHANGED THE WAY I SHOP OR EAT SKITTLES CONVERSATION AROUND ELECTION CANNED WINE TUNA POKE TREND FOOD TAKES STAGE AT AWARDS SHOWS NONE OF THESE CHIPOTLE RECOVERY AFTER E. COLI OUTBREAK LISTERIA OUTBREAKS Q.5: When it comes to food which of the following stories, if any, changed how you shop or eat? N=1,046 2016 41% 45% 50% 2015 2014 2013
  14. 14. 14©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting Behavior Changes by Story Millennials have been far more affected by this year’s foods stories than have those in other age cohorts. More than two-thirds of Millennials have responded behaviorally to at least one story—with almost 1/3 of Millennials changing behavior due to Chipotle’s story. BABY BOOMERS (N=306) C GEN X (N=245) B MILLENNIALS (N=401) A MATURES (N=94) D 29% 15% 16% 13% 12% 10% 9% 10% 11% 8% 12% 10% 11% 11% 5% 8% 7% 5% 5% 4% 2% 32% Chipotle Recovery After E. Coli Outbreak Listeria Outbreaks Clean Eating & Labeling GMO Labeling Bill FDA to Redefine "Healthy" Sugar Industry Pointed Blame at Fat FDA Approves Nutrition Panel That Highlights Sugar Honey Bee Decline Food Delivery Services No Tip Policy At Restaurants Cold Brew Coffee Diet Pepsi Brings Back Aspartame Off-Menu Ordering Pokemon Go at Restaurants Popularity of Turmeric America's Obsession with Donuts Skittles Conversation Around Election Canned Wine Tuna Poke Trend Food Takes Stage at Awards Shows A story not listed here changed the way I shop or eat None of these 19% 19% 14% 14% 11% 10% 12% 3% 1% 2% 1% 2% 0% 0% 2% 1% 1% 0% 0% 0% 4% 55% Q.5: When it comes to food which of the following stories, if any, changed how you shop or eat? N=1,046 a,b,c,d significant difference at 95% confidence level. 20% 16% 11% 10% 8% 7% 6% 6% 6% 7% 3% 4% 4% 1% 5% 0% 1% 2% 2% 2% 4% 49% BCD BC C BD BCD D BCD BCD BCD BCD BCD BCD CD BCD CD D D D D D D A D D B D A A 22% 19% 9% 10% 7% 8% 7% 7% 3% 5% 3% 4% 3% 2% 4% 3% 1% 2% 1% 1% 4% 55%
  15. 15. 15©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting Specific Behavior Changes Consistent with prior years, specific behaviors attempted as a result of food news focused on reducing the consumption of processed food, and focusing more on food labels/ingredient lists. However, this attention on food labels has softened a bit in the last couple of years. 44% 50% 42% 45% 48% 36% 40% 37% 31% 27% NA 26% 21% 26% NA 17% 14% 18% NA 11% 10% NA 10% NA NA NA NA NA NA 5% BC BC C BC BC BC A 2014 (N=555) A 2015 (N=591) B 2016 (N=578) C 38% 36% 35% 36% 32% 35% 36% 35% 27% 26% NA 17% 24% 18% NA 21% 14% 12% 11% 10% 9% 7% 7% NA NA 5% NA 4% NA 6% 38% 38% 35% 34% 33% 32% 31% 30% 23% 23% 23% 20% 19% 19% 19% 16% 16% 15% 10% 10% 9% 9% 8% 8% 7% 7% 6% 4% 4% 8% Q.6: As a result of food news this year in what ways have your eating or shopping habits changed over this past year if at all? Base = those who changed a,b,c significant difference at 95% confidence. NA = attribute not asked. I'm eating less processed food I checked food labels more often I now pay more attention to the ingredient list of my foods I now pay more attention to the labeling on my foods I'm eating less sugar I am paying more attention to the safety of my foods and beverages I'm more likely to think about the health consequences of what I eat I pay more attention to where my food comes from I pay more attention to what my family consumes I am more worried about the future of food I’m more concerned about food health claims Trying new foods/flavors I stopped buying a certain product or brand of product I changed my diet I have changed what I am cooking or baking Educating myself about how my food choices affect the environment I looked to purchase more of a certain product or brand of products I exercised more so I could eat what I wanted Stop/started shopping at a particular place or grocer I now trust different sources for food information Technology played a larger role in my eating or food shopping choices Visited more restaurants I shared my opinions via social media Paid attention to how food brands interact with politics My internet habits search habits changed as a result of the news Have food delivered to my home I’m ordering more items that are “secret” and not listed on the menu Ordered out more I bought more of a food product featured on an awards show My eating and shopping habits have not changed in the past year
  16. 16. 16©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting Q.6: As a result of food news this year in what ways have your eating or shopping habits changed over this past year if at all? Base =those who changed. a,b,c,d notes significant difference at 95% confidence. NA = attribute not asked. Baby Boomers and Matures are more likely to be making health or safety-focused behavior changes than are Millennials. Millennials are more likely than older cohorts to be making changes with technology, going to restaurants/ordering out or having food delivered. Specific Behavior Changes BABY BOOMERS (N=139) C GEN X (N=125) B MILLENNIALS (N=272) A MATURES (N=42) D I checked food labels more often I'm eating less processed food I now pay more attention to the ingredient list of my foods I now pay more attention to the labeling on my foods I'm eating less sugar I am paying more attention to the safety of my foods and beverages I'm more likely to think about the health consequences of what I eat I pay more attention to where my food comes from I am more worried about the future of food I pay more attention to what my family consumes I'm more concerned about food health claims Trying new foods/flavors I have changed what I am cooking or baking I stopped buying a certain ingredient product or brand of product I changed my diet I looked to purchase more of a certain ingredient product or brand of products Educating myself about how my food choices affect the environment I exercised more so I could eat what I wanted Stop/started shopping at a particular place or grocer I now trust different sources for food information Technology played a larger role in my eating or food shopping choices Visited more restaurants I'm paying attention to how food brands interact with politics I shared my opinions via social media Have food delivered to my home My internet search habits changed as a result of the news I'm ordering more items at restaurants that are "secret" and not on menu Ordered out more I bought more of a food product that was featured on an awards show My eating shopping or eating out habits have not changed in the past year 27% 29% 28% 25% 25% 23% 24% 25% 21% 18% 19% 19% 19% 18% 19% 16% 17% 14% 11% 11% 13% 14% 10% 10% 11% 7% 8% 7% 5% 5% BD BC C D CD D D BC CD A A A A A D D C D D D D D A A AB A A AB A A A A D D D D A A A A A A 42% 37% 40% 35% 30% 34% 33% 31% 26% 29% 26% 23% 22% 19% 23% 20% 18% 18% 10% 14% 6% 3% 11% 10% 6% 10% 5% 1% 4% 11% 52% 54% 40% 46% 45% 45% 40% 35% 24% 29% 27% 22% 20% 19% 14% 16% 11% 12% 9% 6% 7% 5% 4% 6% 4% 6% 4% 1% 1% 9% 57% 40% 48% 50% 45% 36% 40% 43% 26% 19% 24% 14% 10% 26% 19% 7% 12% 17% 5% 5% 2% 10% 10% 0% 0% 0% 0% 5% 0% 14%
  17. 17. Opinions on Food & Nutrition While showing a continued decline, the majority of Americans still believe in personal responsibility with regard to what they eat. Opinions this year have turned more negative across a number of food attitudes, with Americans less positive toward organics, cooking and weight loss. People need to take responsibility for what they eat Eating healthfully is extremely important to me I’m looking for fresh and healthy foods when I eat out I need to lose weight There is too much conflicting information about food and nutrition I love to cook Organic foods are more healthy than non-organic foods Fast food is a “no go” these days I will not pay more for a food just because it is more healthful I tend to choose convenient foods over healthful ones I tend to buy national brand food products because they are of higher quality than store brands 68% 73% 52% 53% 48% 44% 42% 2016 2015 Chg. Vs. YAG 47% 42% 47% 40% 46% 29% 36% 32% 30% 27% 31% 25% 27% 24% 25% Q.15: Please tell us how much you agree or disagree with each of the following statements regarding food. 1-10 scale. N=1,046 ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 17 TOP 3 BOX
  18. 18. Opinions on food and nutrition differ somewhat by age cohort, with Baby Boomers and Matures noting stronger belief in responsibility and strive for healthfulness in food. Millennials are showing stronger preference than older cohorts for convenience and national brand foods, while they embrace organics and shy away from fast food. Opinions on Food & NutritionContinued MILLENNIALS (N=401) A TOP 3 BOX BABY BOOMERS (N=306) C MATURES (N=94) D GEN X (N=245) B Q.15: Please tell us how much you agree or disagree with each of the following statements regarding food. a,b,c notes significant difference at 95% confidence level. ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 18 61% 50% 44% 39% 44% 44% 35% 35% 28% 34% 30% D BC BCD BCD BCD 63% 44% 39% 43% 40% 37% 27% 27% 24% 24% 22% D D D 78% 57% 51% 46% 42% 40% 28% 27% 28% 18% 21% AB B ABD D D 79% 62% 38% 41% 37% 30% 26% 14% 31% 10% 13% AB AB People need to take responsibility for what they eat Eating healthfully is extremely important to me I’m looking for fresh and healthy foods when I eat out I need to lose weight There is too much conflicting information about food and nutrition I love to cook Fast food is a “no go” these days Organic foods are more healthy than non-organic foods I will not pay more for a food just because it is more healthful I tend to choose convenient foods over healthful ones I tend to buy national brand food products because they are of higher quality than store brands
  19. 19. 2016 – Year of the… ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting Q.8A: Selecting from the following list, please fill in the blank: "2016 was the year of _____". N=1,046 a,b,c,d significant difference at 95% confidence level. While Americans are not in strong agreement that one particular food dominated the year, more believe that 2016 was either the year of cold brew coffee or the avocado. Opinions differ somewhat by age cohort. Cold brew coffee Avocado Turmeric Donuts Coconut Fried chicken Poke bowls Canned wine Kombucha Milkshakes Kimchee Jerky None of these 13% 7% 7% 4% 5% 5% 1% 1% 4% 2% Cold Brew Coffee 17% Cold Brew Coffee 9% Avocado 11% Turmeric 10% Avocado 14% Donuts 10% Donuts 7% — Avocado 11% Coconut 7% Cold Brew Coffee 11% Turmeric 11% Cold Brew Coffee 13%1 2 3 MILLENNIALS (N=401) BABY BOOMERS (N=306) MATURES (N=94) GEN X (N=245) 2% 2% 2% 12% 38% 19
  20. 20. New Year’s Resolutions Try to lose weight by eating better Consume less sugar Eat less processed food Eat and cook more at home Eat fewer calories Save money on groceries Eat less salt/sodium Eat more protein and fewer carbs Try more recipes Eat more organic foods Eat more locally grown or raised foods Eat more whole grains Eat less meat Try a new food Try a new restaurant Posting fewer pictures of food on social media I have a food or nutrition-related resolution that is not on this list I do not have a food or nutrition-related resolution 32% 30% 28% 24% 21% 22% 18% 18% 15% 15% 15% 12% 12% 11% 9% 2% 2% 21% Q.9: If you have a food or nutrition-related New Year's resolution which of the following, if any, are among your resolutions? N=1,046 ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting Eight in ten Americans have a food-related New Year’s resolution planned for 2016, with trying to lose weight by eating better, consuming less sugar and eating less processed food top the list. Millennials are more likely to have food cooking and experimentation as part of their New Years’ resolution. MILLENNIALS (N=401) A BABY BOOMERS (N=306) C MATURES (N=94) D GEN X (N=245) B Eat & cook more at home Save $ on groceries Try more recipes Try a new food Try a new restaurant 28% 23% 19% 18% 11% CD CD CD BCD CD 25% 25% 18% 9% 10% CD CD D 20% 16% 11% 7% 6% 17% 16% 10% 3% 6% Last year, 19% of Americans resolved to cut sugar out of their drinks—this year almost 1/3 generally want to work on their sweet tooth—suggesting greater focus on cutting out sugar in the year ahead. 20
  21. 21. WHERE AMERICANS GET THEIR FOOD INFORMATION ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 21
  22. 22. 55% 39% 31% - - 40% 26% 31% 20% - 16% - 9% 16% 46% 37% 30% 16% 24% 33% 25% 24% 17% 15% 13% 13% 10% 19% 2014 A 2015 B 2016 C Sources for RECIPES 57% 55% 34% - - 46% 31% - 24% 23% 20% 6% - 13% C C C BC B C 56% 52% 38% - - 44% 27% - 19% 23% 21% 7% - 15% C C A C C 50% 42% 37% 15% 34% 36% 24% 22% 20% 20% 14% 6% 6% 18% AB Websites Books or cookbooks NET: Social Media Other Social Media Facebook Magazines Television YouTube Newspapers Blogs Direct mail email or newsletters Radio Podcasts None of these Sources for Food Information Notable shifting has been seen in how Americans access food information. Overall, we are seeing a decline in the use of traditional media (such as TV, direct mail, books, magazines) for food information, as Americans turn to social media and online forms such as YouTube and podcasts for their food information. Q.10: Now please think for a moment about where in the media you hear or learn about recipes, nutrition, or general food news. 2014 N-1,004 2014 N=1,001 2016 N=1,046 < > significant difference at 95% confidence level. Red font denotes decrease from 2015. 2014 A 2015 B 2016 C Sources for NUTRITION 48% 41% 36% 24% 23% 22% - - - 17% 19% 15% - 18% BC BC BC BC C C BC BC 44% 34% 29% 20% 21% 22% - - - 16% 16% 10% - 22% C C A 41% 30% 29% 20% 20% 22% 11% 18% 14% 13% 12% 12% 8% 25% A A Websites Television Magazines Newspapers Books of cookbooks NET: Social Media Other Social Media Facebook YouTube Blogs Direct mail email or newsletters Radio Podcasts None of these 2014 A 2015 B 2016 C Sources for GENERAL FOOD NEWS Television Websites NET: Social Media Other Social Media Facebook Newspapers Magazines Radio Direct mail email or newsletters YouTube Blogs Podcasts Books or cookbooks None of these 58% 44% 28% - - 41% 31% 34% 22% - 19% - 14% 13% C BC C BC C C C BC C C C C A 22©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting
  23. 23. RADIO DIRECT MAIL OR EMAIL NEWSPAPERS Declines across much of cookbooks, direct mail, blogs and magazines is seen this year as sources for recipes. Posts and videos on Facebook are strong. Detailed Sources: Recipes WEBSITES 36% 15% 13% 11% 6% 3% 1% Recipe sites Food company sites TV channel or show sites Health or medical sites News sites Online advertising Government Sites TELEVISION 17% 4% 4% 4% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% TV Cooking shows TV Talk shows TV New shows – evening Commercials TV Home and garden shows From TV news health experts TV News shows – morning Advertisements From TV celebrities TV Reality show TV Documentaries Infomercials FACEBOOK OTHER SOCIAL MEDIA 8% 5% 2% 5% 5% 4% 2% 1% Pinterest Social media comments from peers Twitter Instagram Videos posted on social media Posts from media Snapchat Social media comments from celebrities 17% 20% 10% 2% Videos posted Posts from peers Posts from media Posts from celebrities YOUTUBE 10% 5% 5% 3% 2% Trending videos TV shows News Spotlight Live Articles Coupon inserts Advertisements PODCASTS 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 11% 7% 4% iTunes Search engine News podcast University podcast National podcast Podcast site Grocery store circulars Email advertising Advertising or coupons sent to home Newsletter 2% 2% 1% 1% 2% 6% 4% 4% 4% Radio advertisements Public radio News shows Music stations Talk radio BOOKS OR COOKBOOKS 31% 11% 5% 4% General Cookbooks Health or diet books Celebrity health or cookbooks Reference books MAGAZINES 23% 13% 10% 10% 9% 4% 2% 2% Food or cooking magazines Women’s magazines Home and garden magazines Lifestyle/fitness magazines Food company or grocery store magazines General news magazines Men’s magazines Celebrity magazines Q.11: And thinking now only about RECIPES for each of these areas where specifically do you find the latest information on recipes? N=1046 Red font denotes decrease from 2015. Note: Facebook, YouTube and Podcasts are newly detailed for 2016 – no YAG exists. BLOGS 12% 6% 4% 2% Blogs about food Blogs from health experts Blogs from moms Blogs from celebrities ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 23
  24. 24. Q.11: And thinking now only about RECIPES for each of these areas where specifically do you find the latest information on recipes? Top sources for recipe news do not differ greatly by age cohort—with recipe websites and general cookbooks hitting #1 or #2 for all ages. Social media posts from peers on Facebook is in the top 5 for three age cohorts—as millennials are also accessing posted videos on Facebook for recipe ideas. Recipe sites 34% Recipe sites 36% General Cookbooks 31% General Cookbooks 35% Recipe sites 38% General Cookbooks 41% General Cookbooks 26% Recipe sites 35% Food or cooking magazines 23% Food or cooking magazines 26% Facebook posts from peers 23% Food or cooking magazines 29% TV cooking shows 20% Newspaper Articles 23% Facebook posts from peers 20% Women's magazines 18% Facebook posts from peers 18% Blogs about food 20% TV cooking shows 17% 1 2 3 4 5 MILLENNIALS (N=401) BABY BOOMERS (N=306) MATURES (N=94) GEN X (N=245) Videos posted on Facebook 23% Top Recipe Sources by Age Cohort ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 24
  25. 25. Detailed Sources: Nutrition RADIO DIRECT MAIL OR EMAIL NEWSPAPERS Sources for nutrition news are quite diffuse, although health or recipe websites, food & cooking magazines, TV cooking shows and newspaper articles do command some attention. WEBSITES 18% 15% 10% 10% 7% 5% 3% Health or medical sites Recipe sites News sites Food company sites TV channel or show sites Government sites Online advertising TELEVISION 13% 9% 8% 8% 5% 5% 5% 3% 3% 2% 2% 2% TV Cooking shows TV New shows – evening TV News shows – morning From TV news health experts TV Talk shows Commercials TV Documentaries TV Home and garden shows Advertisements From TV celebrities TV Reality show Infomercials FACEBOOK OTHER SOCIAL MEDIA 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 2% 2% 2% Pinterest Social media comments from peers Instagram Videos posted on social media Posts from media Snapchat Social media comments from celebrities Twitter 9% 6% 5% 3% Posts from peers Videos posted Posts from media Posts from celebrities YOUTUBE 5% 4% 3% 2% 2% Trending videos News TV shows Spotlight Live Articles Coupon inserts Advertisements PODCASTS 2% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 13% 3% 3% iTunes News podcast National podcast Podcast site Search engine University podcast Newsletter Grocery store circulars Email advertising Advertising or coupons sent to home 4% 3% 3% 2% 1% 5% 4% 4% 3% Talk radio Public radio News shows Radio advertisements Music stations BOOKS OR COOKBOOKS 8% 8% 4% 2% General Cookbooks Health or diet books Reference books Celebrity health or cookbooks MAGAZINES 15% 11% 9% 7% 6% 5% 3% 2% Food or cooking magazines Lifestyle/fitness magazines Women’s magazines Food company or grocery store magazines General news magazines Home and garden magazines Men’s magazines Celebrity magazines BLOGS 6% 6% 3% 2% Blogs about food Blogs from health experts Blogs from moms Blogs from celebrities Q.11: And thinking now only about NUTRITION for each of these areas where specifically do you find the latest information on nutrition N=1046 Red font denotes decrease from 2015. Note: Facebook, YouTube and Podcasts are newly detailed for 2016 – no YAG exists. ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 25
  26. 26. Q.12: And thinking now only about NUTRITION for each of these areas where specifically do you find the latest information on nutrition? Recipe sites 17% Health or medical site 21% Food or cooking magazines 15% Food or cooking magazines 18% Health or medical site 19% Newspaper articles 31% Health or medical site 16% Food or cooking magazines 20% TV cooking shows 12% Health or medical site 19% Facebook posts from peers 15% Newspaper articles 16% TV cooking shows 15% Women's magazines 14% Recipe sites 12% TV cooking shows TV News shows—evening TV health experts 12% Recipe sites 15% TV cooking shows 11% Newspaper articles 11% 1 2 3 4 5 MILLENNIALS (N=401) BABY BOOMERS (N=306) MATURES (N=94) GEN X (N=245) Food company sites 14% Health or medical sites fall into the top five sources of nutrition information across all age cohorts. Millennials are the only age cohort that seek out Facebook posts from peers or Food company sites as top nutrition information sources. Top Nutrition Sources by Age Cohort ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 26
  27. 27. Detailed Sources: General Food News RADIO DIRECT MAIL OR EMAIL NEWSPAPERS Newspaper articles, news sites, evening and morning news shows and cooking shows are the most frequent sources for general food news. WEBSITES 17% 11% 11% 8% 7% 4% 2% News sites Health or medical sites Recipe sites TV channel or show sites Food company sites Government sites Online advertising TELEVISION 18% 17% 15% 10% 9% 7% 6% 5% 4% 2% 2% 2% TV New shows – evening TV Cooking shows TV News shows – morning From TV news health experts Commercials TV Talk shows TV Documentaries Advertisements TV Home and garden shows From TV celebrities TV Reality show Infomercials FACEBOOK OTHER SOCIAL MEDIA 5% 4% 4% 4% 4% 3% 2% 2% Social media comments from peers Twitter Instagram Videos posted on social media Posts from media Pinterest Snapchat Social media comments from celebrities 12% 10% 7% 3% Posts from peers Posts from media Videos posted Posts from celebrities YOUTUBE 5% 5% 3% 2% 2% TV shows News Trending videos Spotlight Live Articles Coupon inserts Advertisements PODCASTS 3% 2% 2% 2% 1% 1% 23% 7% 5% News podcast National podcast Podcast site iTunes Search engine University podcast Grocery store circulars Email advertising Newsletter Advertising or coupons sent to home 7% 7% 7% 4% 3% 7% 4% 4% 3% Public radio News shows Talk radio Radio advertisements Music stations BOOKS OR COOKBOOKS 4% 3% 1% 2% General Cookbooks Health or diet books Celebrity health or cookbooks Reference books MAGAZINES 13% 7% 7% 6% 6% 5% 2% 2% Food or cooking magazines Lifestyle/fitness magazines General news magazines Women’s magazines Food company or grocery store magazines Home and garden magazines Men’s magazines Celebrity magazines BLOGS 5% 3% 3% 2% Blogs about food Blogs from health experts Blogs from moms Blogs from celebrities Q.11: And thinking now only about GENERAL FOOD NEWS for each of these areas where specifically do you find the latest information on general food news? N=1046 Red font denotes decrease from 2015. Note: Facebook, YouTube and Podcasts are newly detailed for 2016 – no YAG exists. ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 27
  28. 28. Q.13: And thinking now only about GENERAL FOOD NEWS for each of these areas where specifically do you find the latest information on general food news? Facebook posts from peers 20% News sites 19% Newspaper articles 18% TV News shows —evening 25% Newspaper articles 30% Newspaper articles 44% News sites 17% TV News shows —evening 26% TV cooking shows 16% TV cooking shows 20% Facebook posts from media outlets/ publishers 17% TV cooking shows 23% TV News shows —morning 17% Food or cooking magazines 20% TV News shows —morning 16% TV News shows —morning 15% Food or cooking magazines 16% TV News shows —evening 14% Food or cooking magazines 13% 1 2 3 4 5 MILLENNIALS (N=401) BABY BOOMERS (N=306) MATURES (N=94) GEN X (N=245) Newspaper articles 14% While Newspaper articles are utilized by all age groups, Facebook posts from peers and media outlets are a source for general food news that is strongly unique to Millennials. Top General Foods News Sources by Age Cohort ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 28
  29. 29. Trust in News Sources Overall, Americans are reporting somewhat higher levels of trust in some media sources (as evidenced by higher Top 2 Box ratings), although their ranking of most trusted to least trusted sources is similar to trend —with health or medical sites, TV cooking shows, Food or Cooking Magazines and Blogs from Health Experts the most trusted. Lower levels of trust are seen with social media, YouTube and advertising. Q.14: And how much do you trust each of these sources for providing you with truthful unbiased information on food? Base = those who used source. Green font denotes increase from 2015. Note: Facebook, YouTube and Podcasts are newly detailed for 2016 – no YAG exists. 77% 77% 76% 74% 74% 74% 72% 72% 72% 71% 70% 68% 68% 68% 68% 68% 67% 67% 65% 65% 65% 65% 65% YouTube News Women's magazines Men's magazines* Blogs from celebrities Podcast search engine/directory* News sites YouTube TV shows Newsletter National podcast Talk radio TV channel or show sites Pinterest Grocery store circulars Blogs about food Food company or grocery store mags TV Talk shows TV Reality show Itunes podcast Food company sites Music stations Celebrity health or cookbooks Social media posts from celebrities* Instagram *Small sample size 64% 64% 63% 63% 62% 60% 59% 59% 59% 59% 58% 58% 57% 56% 55% 55% 52% 52% 52% 50% 45% 44% 43% 43% Facebook posts from celebrities From TV celebrities Facebook posts from media outlets/publishers YouTube Live YoutTube Spotlight YouTube trending videos Videos posted on Facebook Coupon inserts Facebook posts from peers Snapchat Social media posts/comments from peers Podcast site* Twitter Social media posts from media outlets/publishers Videos posted on social media Online advertising Email advertising Celebrity magazines Advertising or coupons sent to home Radio advertisements Commercials TV Advertisements Newspapers Advertisements Infomercials MOST TRUSTED LEAST TRUSTED 91% 87% 87% 87% 86% 86% 86% 85% 85% 84% 84% 84% 84% 83% 82% 80% 79% 79% 79% 78% 78% 77% 77% Health or medical sites Food or cooking magazines TV Home and garden shows Blogs from health experts Reference books Health or diet books General Cookbooks From TV news health experts TV Documentaries TV News shows—morning TV Cooking shows Home and garden magazines Government sites TV News shows—evening Articles Blogs from moms Recipe sites Lifestyle/fitness magazines News podcast News shows General news magazines Public radio University podcast* TOP 2 BOX TRUST IN NEWS SOURCE ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 29
  30. 30. DEMOGRAPHICS ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 30
  31. 31. Demographics Male/Female Age (Mean) Millennial Gen X Baby Boomers Matures Race/Ethnicity Hispanic Caucasian Asian Black/African American Other Region Northeast South Midwest West 50%/50% 44.5 38% 23% 29% 9% 13% 77% 12% 7% 3% 17% 38% 22% 23% Total Respondents N=1,046 ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting 31 Total Respondents N=1,046 (41% 1st generation) Employment Full time Part time Retired Stay-at-home parent Full time student Unemployed Disabled Income (Median) % With Children in HH Marital Status Married Never married Single but living as married Divorced Widowed 55% 10% 15% 6% 6% 5% 2% $72.5k 28% 53% 21% 16% 7% 3%
  32. 32. ©2016 Hunter Public Relations in Partnership with Libran Research & Consulting Samara Farber Mormar Hunter Public Relations www.hunterpr.com 212-679-6600 smormar@hunterpr.com Jane Mount Libran Research & Consulting www.libranresearch.com 207-219-8350 jane.mount@libranresearch.com For additional information regarding the Hunter Public Relations Annual Food News Study and putting these insights to work for your brand, contact:

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