Social media and trade associations

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An overview of how social media can help trade associations achieve thier membership and communications goals. Drafted by corporate communications consultancy, Aspect Consulting. www.aspectconsulting.eu

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  • Questions – pleas ask as we go.Big subject and lots to cover but need to be clear as we goList on flipchart
  • Flip chart and pens
  • How it is found?How it is shared?InstantInternational
  • Mobile makes social instant and easy472 million smart phones sold in 2011(Gartner)297 million in 201058% increase year on yearDriving growth of social media1. – Journalists, 24 hour/weekly news cycle, One way communication2. - Journalists + readers, Rolling news cycle, Limited interaction3. - Journalists + consumers + activists + government + business, 24 -7- 365, Instant and mobile, Little or no editorial control, CONVERSATIONS
  • According to research released by ComRes and ZN at the European Commission on May 10, 70% of MEPs use Facebook at least once a week for professional purposes, while only 22% of European Commission officials do likewise.Methodology: ComRes surveyed 102 MEPs in February 2012 by self-completion postal questionnaire and online. Data were weighted to be geographically and politically representative of the European Parliament. ComRes also surveyed 258 Brussels Influencers in November 2011 online. ComRes’s research complies with ESOMAR guidelines.
  • Amex – in 2010, American Express and FB team up for Small bus sat – encourage shoppers to shop small and support small biz. Amex and FB offered free advertising to 10,000 business owners who signed up to participate. Now have more than 1,000 people talking about the benefits of OPEN through FB
  • Amex – in 2010, American Express and FB team up for Small bus sat – encourage shoppers to shop small and support small biz. Amex and FB offered free advertising to 10,000 business owners who signed up to participate. Now have more than 1,000 people talking about the benefits of OPEN through FB
  • Pull up DADHC Facebook pageTalk thruNeed to cover the following areas:Opinion - personal opinion and not that of the companyCommon sense - don’t publish any opinions on the association or its members that you aren’t happy to say to your colleagues and peersIdentity - open and honest about who you work forRespect copyrightsDon’t misuse association resources
  • Could we do two examples here – one really bad post and one really good and then talk around these points instead of listing them?
  • Can you prepare for a crisis? Yes. During a crisis, you’ll draw on good or bad will that you have – not just with customers, but with any interested party in your business. Make sure it’s goodwill you have banked. Example: Nestle. Who would believe Nestle over Greenpeace during the KitKat / Palm Oil issue? Greenpeace always had the upper hand.Some of the most serious crises are ‘offline’ issues that’s provoked the crisis – viral videos, Twitter storms, visible discussions over Facebook all mean word spreads in minutes. Don’t silo social media, or expect that you can control it. You can’t – but you can contain a crisis. Work out what your crises might be. (and where possible, avoid them). Nestle ended up agreeing to re-assess its sourcing of Palm Oil – how much heartache could have been prevented if it had done this ahead of the issue breaking?
  • Social media and trade associations

    1. 1. Social mediaworkshop4th July 2012
    2. 2. HelloRichard HoughtonLondon MD, former Chairman of thePRCA and President of ICCOFrans GreenBrussels MDSarah WilkinsonSenior Consultant, ex-Facebook PR
    3. 3. Next 60 minutes1. What is social media? How is it evolving?2. Why social media counts3. Social media at its best4. Building a social media programme5. Social media and crisis communications6. Getting started
    4. 4. Before we startWhy might social media be importantfor your association?What concerns you about using socialmedia?
    5. 5. Why we think you might be interested1. Member expectations and social media activities2. Opportunity to start debates and highlighting sector benefits3. „Owned channels‟ to respond to issues and negatives4. Reach wide audience 1. Members 2. Policy makers 3. Policy influencers 4. Stakeholders5. Help with crisis communications
    6. 6. What is social media?
    7. 7. Forms of electronic communication (as Websites for social networking and microblogging) through which users create online communities to share information, ideas, personal messages, and other content (as videos)
    8. 8. Why social media counts
    9. 9. Fundamental change‘Changing the philosophy of information’ Tim Weber Editor, Business and Technology
    10. 10. Evolution of information consumption Fed informationNewspapers/Nightly news TV & Print Seek information Search engines & online Digital search newspapers Create information Social media Mobile
    11. 11. EU Stakeholders70% of MEPs and 22% of Weekly LinkedIn usage:Commission officials use •Business – 46%Facebook at least once a •Trade associations - 57%week •NGOs – 61%88% of MEPs use •MEPs – 20%Wikipedia at least oncea month Twitter is used by 48% of MEPs
    12. 12. Commissionhttp://youtu.be/RHfDuKQDO4Q
    13. 13. Social media at its best
    14. 14. Aspect examples Cable Europe •Launched Twitter handle to support announcements at Cable Congress • Retweeted by Neelie Kroes following her address at the Congress • Created #cablecongress2012 and used by attendees,including media. More than 300 tweets during the event. 600 followers. Department of Ageing, Disability and Healthcare • Launched Facebook page to raise awareness of activities and celebrate the diversity and abilities of people around Day of People with a Disability • Increased attendance at events, wider circulation of „Made You Look‟ magazine, steady increase of engagements year on year Breakfast is Best • Twitter handle to support launch of European Breakfast Day and drive decision makers to sign online pledge to promote breakfast eating • Achieved 300 signatures for online pledge • Retweets by MEPs, major nutritional organisations and NGOs
    15. 15. Commercial examples Dell• One of the most active B2B and B2B brands on Twitter• Within two years Dell‟s revenue through Twitter was $6.5m• Dell has a worldwide community of more than 3.5m through its channels – Facebook, Twitter and YouTube Cisco• Held launch of new router product purely through social media• Launch was attended by 9,000 people – 90 times more attendees• Saved 42,000 gallons of gas, generated 3 times as much press and 40m online impressions• One-sixth the cost of traditional launch saving $100,000 American Express• Facebook page developed to support long standing OPEN Forum• Campaigns ran as required, content included videos and tutorials• Small Business Saturday campaign liked by 2.8 million people• Posts generate on average 900 comments
    16. 16. Building a social mediaprogramme
    17. 17. Programmes Different for every organisationOne size doesn‟t fit all
    18. 18. Building a programme 8. Refinement 6. Start 7. Monitor and conversations evaluate 4. Resourcing 5. Content and policies development1. Setting 2. Strategy 3. Channelobjectives development selection
    19. 19. Building a programme 8. Refinement 6. Start 7. Monitor and conversations evaluate 4. Resourcing 5. Content and policies development1. Setting 2. Strategy 3. Channelobjectives development selection
    20. 20. Setting clear objectivesSocial media needs objectives like any other programmeAgree how success will be measuredConsider timescalesWrite them down!
    21. 21. Building a programme 8. Refinement 6. Start 7. Monitor and conversations evaluate 4. Resourcing 5. Content and policies development1. Setting 2. Strategy 3. Channelobjectives selection development
    22. 22. Developing a strategy• Take a step back and consider• Objectives• Positioning of your organisation• Audiences want to reach• Context for conversation• What you have communicated before• Your „traditional‟ communications activities• Member activities and opportunities for collaboration• Timescales
    23. 23. Building a programme 8. Refinement 6. Start 7. Monitor and conversations evaluate 4. Resourcing 5. Content and policies development1. Setting 2. Strategy 3. Channelobjectives development selection
    24. 24. Channel selection1. Go back to objectives – who is your audience?2. Identify the channels they are engaged on3. Test out channels – see where most engagement takes place4. Focus effort on most successful channels
    25. 25. Channel selection Networking Showcase videos Thought leadership Micro blogging Driving traffic Driving traffic Sharing content NetworkingShowcase pictures Driving traffic Association Website Information source NetworkingCommunity building Driving traffic Thought leadership B2B Marketing Driving traffic Thought leadership Search Engine Networking Analytics Community building
    26. 26. Building a programme 8. Refinement 6. Start 7. Monitor and conversations evaluate 4. Resourcing 5. Content and policies development1. Setting 2. Strategy 3. Channelobjectives development selection
    27. 27. Resourcing and social media policyResourcing• Objectives• Strategy• Frequency of interaction• Expertise and interest• In-house or external• Judgement and refineSocial media policy• Written, agreed and communicated before start• Keep it simple “Don‟t be stupid”
    28. 28. Building a programme 8. Refinement 6. Start 7. Monitor and conversations evaluate 4. Resourcing 5. Content and policies development1. Setting 2. Strategy 3. Channelobjectives development selection
    29. 29. 10 tips to develop content1. What conversation do you want to create?2. Think channel format3. Text, audio or video4. Develop a personality and write in the first person5. Tell a story6. Keep it concise, consistent and compelling7. Aim to develop reputation for being subject expert8. Link to third parties9. Include search words10. Know your subject and bring something new Remember ultimate objective
    30. 30. Building a programme 8. Refinement 6. Start 7. Monitor and conversations evaluate 4. Resourcing 5. Content and policies development1. Setting 2. Strategy 3. Channelobjectives development selection
    31. 31. Starting conversations • Listen to relevant conversations • Identify influencers in your sectorListen • Analyse topics being discussed • Develop your view on relevant topics and consider what you can addDevelop • Engage with influencers • Slow and steadyEngage • 20% your messages 80% sharing and responding
    32. 32. ToolsSocial Media IdentifyingDashboards Influencers
    33. 33. Building a programme 8. Refinement 6. Start 7. Monitor conversations and evaluate 4. Resourcing 5. Content and policies development1. Setting 2. Strategy 3. Channelobjectives development selection
    34. 34. Evaluation Review objectives and select appropriate metricsGoals MetricsIncrease awareness Reach Followers „Branded‟ mentions Comments LinksDrive visitors to website VisitsGenerate enquiries Number of enquiries and downloadsDevelop partnerships Visits, returns and downloads LinksMember relations Visits, interactions and comments
    35. 35. Evaluation• Sentiment analysis• Measure perceptions and feelings towards an organisation• Based on positive and negative social signals• Can identify issues and opportunities
    36. 36. Building a programme 8. Refinement 6. Start 7. Monitor and conversations evaluate 4. Resourcing 5. Content and policies development1. Setting 2. Strategy 3. Channelobjectives development selection
    37. 37. Programme refinement Objectives Implement Evaluation Strategy & Reality Check Tactic ReviewGood mixture of art and science
    38. 38. Role of social media incrisis
    39. 39. Crisis reality• You can‟t change the reputation you had before the crisis hit. Make sure it‟s a good one• Understand what your crisis could look like• Plan for a crisis: have people and processes ready at the push of a button• Have a social media policy in place for employees• Real world crises play out over social media
    40. 40. Crisis preparation• Preparation: – Know your weak spots: be objective about the sector and organisation – Have a crisis plan ready – Rehearse and train• Action plan – Monitor – Act quickly but calmly – Involve senior management – Take it seriously• Review and refine once it‟s all over
    41. 41. Aspect Consulting
    42. 42. Aspect services Social media strategy development1 Full strategy and plan including resource requirements and evaluation techniques Social media team training2 Understand how to develop a programme, work relevant tools and manage conversations Social media crisis training3 Social media scenario training on „closed‟ network around bespoke scenario 15% discount for today‟s attendees
    43. 43. Final thought "Twitter is not a technology. Its aconversation. And its happening with or without you." Charlene Li Founder, Altimeter Group Co-author, Groundswell
    44. 44. Social media workshop4th July 2012

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