Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Monitor and Control Process Group - Part One

This is PMBOK Guide Monitor and Control Process Group - Part One. It includes three Knowledge Area - Project Integration Management, Project Scope Management, and Project Quality Management - with five processes - Monitor & Control Project Work, Perform Integrated Change Control, Validate Scope, Control Scope, Control Quality -.

  • Login to see the comments

Monitor and Control Process Group - Part One

  1. 1. Monitoring & Controlling Process Group Project Management Processes PMBOK 5th Edition Hossam Maghrabi,PMP
  2. 2. Monitoring & Controlling Processes & Knowledge Areas Controlling Changes & Recommending Corrective or Preventive Action. Monitoring the Ongoing Project Activities against the Project’s Plans & Performance Measurement Baseline. Measured & Analyzed at Regular Intervals, Appropriate Events, or Exception Conditions to identify variances from the project management plan & identifies any areas requiring additional attention.
  3. 3. Monitor & Control Project Work: Data Flow Diagram The process of Tracking, Reviewing, & Reporting the progress to meet the Performance Objectives defined in the project management plan It allows stakeholders to understand the Current State of the Project, the Steps Taken, & Budget, Schedule, & Scope Forecasts.
  4. 4. Monitor & Control Project Work: General Note: Monitoring includes, Collecting, Measuring, & Distributing Performance Information. Assessing Measurements & trends to effect Process Improvements. Control includes, Determining Corrective or Preventive Actions or Re-planning. Following up on Action Plans to determine whether the actions taken resolved the performance issue. Monitor & Control Project Work Concerned With, • Comparing actual project performance against the project management plan. • Assessing performance to determine whether any corrective or preventive actions are indicated. • Identifying new risks and analyzing, tracking, and monitoring existing project risks. • Maintaining an accurate, timely information through project life cycle. • Providing information to support status reporting, progress measurement, and forecasting. • Providing forecasts to update current cost and current schedule information. • Monitoring implementation of approved changes. • Providing appropriate reporting on project progress and status to high level management.
  5. 5. Monitor & Control Project Work: Inputs 1. Project Management Plan - Subsidiary plans & baselines within the project management plan form the basis for controlling the project. 2. Schedule Forecasts - Derived from a schedule progress against a schedule baseline and computed time estimate to complete (ETC). The forecast may be used to determine if the project is still within defined tolerance ranges and identify any necessary change requests. 3. Cost Forecasts - Same as schedule Forecasts. 4. Validated Changes - Provides the necessary data to confirm that the change was appropriately executed. 5. Work Performance Information is the work performance data collected from various controlling processes then analyze it in context integrated based on relationships across areas for providing a sound foundation for project decisions. Data in itself cannot be used in the decision-making process as it has only Out-Of-Context Meaning. Work performance information is circulated through Communication Processes. 6. Enterprise Environmental Factors 7. Organizational Process Assets
  6. 6. Monitor & Control Project Work: Tools & Techniques (T&T) 1. Expert Judgment - To interpret the information provided by the monitor & control processes. So, the project manager with the Project Management team, determines the actions required to ensure that project performance matches expectations. 2. Analytical Techniques - Applied in project management to forecast potential outcomes based on possible variations of project or environmental variables and their relationships with other variables. Ex. Regression analysis, Grouping methods, Causal analysis, Forecasting methods, Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), Fault tree analysis (FTA), Reserve analysis, Trend analysis, Earned value management, Variance analysis) 3. Project Management Information System - It’s a part of enterprise environmental factors. it provides access to automated tools, such as scheduling, cost, & resourcing tools, performance indicators, databases, project records….. 4. Meetings - Ex. groups & review meetings……
  7. 7. Monitor & Control Project Work: Tools & Techniques (T&T) 1. Expert Judgment - To interpret the information provided by the monitor & control processes. So, the project manager with the Project Management team, determines the actions required to ensure that project performance matches expectations. 2. Analytical Techniques - Applied in project management to forecast potential outcomes based on possible variations of project or environmental variables and their relationships with other variables. Ex. Regression analysis, Grouping methods, Causal analysis, Forecasting methods, Failure Mode & Effect Analysis (FMEA), Fault tree analysis (FTA), Reserve analysis, Trend analysis, Earned value management, Variance analysis) 3. Project Management Information System - It’s a part of enterprise environmental factors. it provides access to automated tools, such as scheduling, cost, & resourcing tools, performance indicators, databases, project records….. 4. Meetings - Ex. groups & review meetings……
  8. 8. Monitor & Control Project Work: Tools & Techniques (T&T)
  9. 9. Perform Integrated Change Control: Data Flow Diagram The process of Reviewing All Change Requests, Approving Changes & Managing Changes To Deliverables, Organizational Process Assets, Project Scope Statement, and Project Management Plan Those Happens throughout the project life. This Process is specified in the change control and configuration control systems
  10. 10. Perform Integrated Change Control: & Change Control Board (CCB) When Required, The Perform Integrated Change Control Process includes A Change Control Board (CCB). A Change Control Board (CCB) is a formally chartered group Responsible For Reviewing, Evaluating, Approving, Delaying, or Rejecting Changes to the Project, & For Recording & Communicating such Decisions. Approved Change Requests can require new or revised cost estimates, activity sequences, schedule dates, resource requirements, and analysis of risk response alternatives. Customer or Sponsor approval may be required for certain change requests after CCB approval, unless they are part of the CCB. As part of Change & Configuration Management Processes the Changes are documented and updated within the project management plan.
  11. 11. Perform Integrated Change Control: & Configuration Control Configuration Control is focused on the specification of both the Deliverables & the Processes. Change Control is focused on identifying, documenting, and approving or rejecting changes to the project documents, deliverables, or baselines. Following is some of the Configuration Management Activities included in the Perform Integrated Change Control process: - Configuration Identification - Identification & Selection of a Configuration item to provide the basis for which The Product Configuration is Defined & Verified, Products & Documents are Labeled, Changes are managed, and Accountability is Maintained. - Configuration Status Accounting - Information is Recorded & Reported as to when appropriate data about the configuration item should be provided. This information includes a Listing of Approved Configuration Identification, Status of Proposed Changes to the Configuration, and the Implementation Status of Approved Changes. - Configuration Verification & Audit - To make sure that the functional requirements defined in the configuration documentation have been met, by ensure the composition of a project’s configuration items is correct & that corresponding changes are registered, assessed, approved, tracked, & correctly implemented.
  12. 12. Perform Integrated Change Control: Inputs 1. Project Management Plan - All Project Plans & Baselines. Changes are documented and updated within the project management plan as part of the change & configuration management processes. Ex. Change management plan, which provides the direction for managing the change control process and documents the formal change control board (CCB) . It’s an output of Develop Project Management Plan as part of Subsidiary plans. 2. Work Performance Reports - Work performance reports of particular interest to the Perform Integrated Change Control process include Resource Availability, Schedule & Cost Data, Earned Value Management (EVM) reports…… 3. Change Requests - All of the Monitoring and Controlling processes and many of the Executing processes produce change requests as an output. The Corrective & Preventive Actions do not normally affect the project baselines—only the performance against the baselines. 2. Enterprise Environmental Factors. 3. Organizational Process Assets - include, Change Control Procedures, Procedures for Approving & Issuing Change Authorizations, Configuration Management Knowledge Base ……
  13. 13. Perform Integrated Change Control: Tools & Techniques (T&T) 1. Expert Judgment - Ex. Consultants, Stakeholders, including customers or sponsors, Professional and technical associations, Industry groups, Subject matter experts (SMEs), and Project management office (PMO). 2. Meetings - Change Control Meetings / Change Control Board (CCB) The Roles & Responsibilities of CCB are clearly defined and agreed upon by appropriate stakeholders & documented in the change management plan. CCB Decisions are documented and communicated to the stakeholders for information and follow-up actions. Cost of Implementing Changes in the project goes up as the project gets further along. Therefore, it is best to prevent changes if possible, and if not possible, to make those changes as soon as possible in the project. If you cannot avoid making a change, then you need to go through the process of analyzing what the impact on the project will be. 1. Change Control Tools - Tools are used to manage the change requests & the resulting decisions In order To Facilitate Configuration & Change Management. Tool selection should be based on the needs of the project stakeholders including organizational and environmental considerations and/or constraints. Additional Considerations should be made for communication to assist the CCB members in their duties as well as distribute the decisions to the appropriate stakeholders.
  14. 14. Perform Integrated Change Control: Outputs 1. Approved Change Requests - are processed according to the Change Control System by the project manager, CCB, or by an assigned team member. Approved change requests will be implemented through the Direct & Manage Project Work process. The disposition of all change requests, approved or not, will be updated in the change log as part of updates to the project documents. 2. Change Log - is used to document changes that occur during a project. All Changes & their Impact to the project in terms of time, cost, & risk, are communicated to the appropriate stakeholders. Rejected change requests are also captured in the change log. 3. Project Management Plan Updates- Any subsidiary plans & Baselines that are subject to the formal change control process. Changes to baselines should only show the changes from the current time forward. Past performance may not be changed. This protects the integrity of the baselines and the historical data of past performance. 4. Project Documents Updates - All documents specified as being subject to the project’s formal change control process Ex. Schedule and cost forecasts, Work performance reports, Issue log.
  15. 15. Validate Scope: Data Flow Diagram The process of formalizing acceptance of the completed project deliverables. It brings objectivity to the acceptance process & increases the chance of final product, service, or result acceptance by validating each deliverable.
  16. 16. Validate Scope Vs. Control Quality A Deliverable is any Unique & Verifiable Product, Result, or Capability that results in a Validated Deliverable Required by the Project. The Validate Scope process differs from the Control Quality process in that, Validate Scope is primarily concerned with Formal Acceptance of the Deliverables. Quality Control is primarily concerned with Correctness of the Deliverables & Meeting the Quality Requirements Specified For the Deliverables. Control Quality is generally performed before Validate Scope, although the two processes may be performed in parallel. The relation between Validate Scope process & Control Quality process, The verified deliverables obtained from the Control Quality process are reviewed with the customer or sponsor to ensure that they are completed satisfactorily & have Received Formal Acceptance of the Deliverables - Validated Scope - by the customer or sponsor.
  17. 17. Validate Scope: Inputs 1. Project Management Plan - The scope management plan specifies how formal acceptance of the completed project deliverables will be obtained. The scope baseline includes the approved version of a scope statement, work breakdown structure (WBS), and its associated WBS dictionary, that can be changed only through formal change control procedures and is used as a basis for comparison Validate Scope. 2. Requirements Documentation - Lists all types of requirements for the project and product, along with their acceptance criteria. 3. Requirements Traceability Matrix - Link requirements to their origin and tracks them throughout the project life cycle. 4. Verified Deliverables - The project deliverables that are Completed & Checked for Correctness through the Control Quality process. 5. Work Performance Data –includes, Degree of Compliance with Requirements, Number of Non-Conformities, Severity of the Non-Conformities, or the Number of Validation Cycles Performed in a Period of Time.
  18. 18. Validate Scope: Tools & Techniques (T&T) 1. Inspection - Reviews, Product Reviews, Audits, & Walkthroughs - used to determine whether work & deliverables meet requirements and product acceptance criteria. Includes activities such as measuring, examining, & validating. 2. Group Decision-Making Techniques - used to reach a conclusion when the validation is performed by the project team and other stakeholders.
  19. 19. Validate Scope: Outputs 1. Accepted Deliverables - Deliverables that meet the acceptance criteria are formally signed off & approved by the customer or sponsor. A formal documentation received from the customer or sponsor acknowledging formal stakeholder acceptance of the project’s deliverables is forwarded to the Close Project or Phase process. 2. Change Requests - The completed Deliverables that have not been formally accepted are documented, along with the reasons for non-acceptance of those deliverables. Those deliverables may require a change request for defect repair. 3. Work Performance Information - Includes information, such as which deliverables have started, their progress, which deliverables have finished, or which have been accepted. 4. Project Documents Updates - Ex. Any documents that define the product or report status on product completion.
  20. 20. Control Scope: Data Flow Diagram Scope Creep is the Uncontrolled Expansion To Product or Project Scope Without Adjustments To Time, Cost, & Resources is Referred. The process of Monitoring the status of the Project & Product Scope & Managing Changes to the Scope Baseline. It Allows the Scope Baseline to Be Maintained throughout the project.
  21. 21. Control Scope: Inputs 1. Project Management Plan - Ex. Scope Baseline, Scope Management Plan, Change Management Plan, Configuration Management Plan & Requirements Management Plan. 2. Requirements Documentation - Well-documented requirements make it easier to detect any deviation in the scope agreed for the project or product. Requirements should be Unambiguous [ Measurable & Testable ], Traceable, Complete, Consistent, & Acceptable to key stakeholders. 3. Requirements Traceability Matrix - Helps to Detect the impact of any change or deviation from the scope baseline on the project objectives. 4. Work Performance Data - Include, the number of change requests received, the number of requests accepted or the number of deliverables completed. 5. Organizational Process Assets.
  22. 22. Control Scope: Tools & Techniques (T&T) 1. Variance Analysis - is a technique for Determining the Cause & Degree of difference between the Baseline & Actual performance. Important aspects of project scope control include – Determining the Cause & Degree of Variance relative to the Scope Baseline. – Deciding whether Corrective or Preventive Action is required. Project performance measurements are used to Assess the Magnitude of Variation from the Original Scope Baseline.
  23. 23. Control Scope: Outputs 1. Work Performance Information - This information provides a foundation for making scope decisions. Includes, Correlated & Contextualized information on How the Project Scope is performing Compared To the Scope Baseline. The Categories of the Changes Received, The Identified Scope Variances & Their Causes, How They Impact Schedule or Cost, & The Forecast of the Future Scope Performance. 2. Change Requests - Analysis of scope performance can result in a change request to the Scope Baseline or other Components of the Project Management plan. 3. Project Management Plan Updates. 4. Project Documents Updates. 5. Organizational Process Assets Updates.
  24. 24. Control Quality: Data Flow Diagram The process of Monitoring & Recording results of executing the quality activities to assess performance and recommend necessary changes By, Identifying the Causes of Poor Process or Product Quality for Recommending / Taking Action To Eliminate Them. Validating that Project Deliverables & Work meet the requirements specified by key stakeholders necessary for Final Acceptance [Validate Scope].
  25. 25. Control Quality: General Note: The Control Quality process uses a set of operational techniques & tasks To Verify that The Delivered Output will meet the Requirements. Quality Assurance should be used during the project’s planning and executing phases To Provide Confidence That the Stakeholder’s Requirements will be Met & Quality Control should be used during the Project Executing & Closing Phases To Formally Demonstrate, With Reliable Data, that The Sponsor and/or Customer’s Acceptance Criteria have been Met. The Pairs Of Quality Control Terms
  26. 26. Control Quality: Inputs 1. Project Management Plan - Describes how quality control will be performed within the project. 2. Quality Metrics - Describes a Project or Product Attribute & How it will be Measured ( Ex. Function Points, Mean Time Between Failure (MTBF), & Mean Time To Repair (MTTR). 3. Quality Checklists -A structured Lists that help to Verify That The Project’s Work & its Deliverables Fulfill a Set of Requirements. 4. Work Performance Data - Ex. Planned vs. Actual Technical, Schedule, & Cost performance. 5. Approved Change Requests - To verify that the Approved Changes are implemented on time. 6. Deliverables - 7. Project Documents - Ex. Agreements, Quality Audit Reports & Change Logs supported with corrective action plans, Process documentation. 8. Organizational Process Assets - Ex. Organization’s Quality Standards & Policies, Standard work guidelines, Issue & defect reporting procedures and communication policies…….
  27. 27. Control Quality: Tools & Techniques (T&T) 1. Seven Basic Quality Tools - Please refer to Planning Process Group – [ Plan Quality Management ]
  28. 28. Control Quality: Tools & Techniques (T&T) 2. Statistical Sampling - Samples are Selected & Tested as defined in the quality management plan. Please refer to Planning Process Group – [ Plan Quality Management ] 3. Inspection - [ maybe called Reviews, Peer Reviews, Audits, or Walkthroughs ] An inspection is the examination of a work product to determine if it conforms to documented standards. Also, It is used to Validate Defect Repairs The results of an inspection generally include measurements & may be conducted at any level. Ex. The results of a single activity can be inspected, or the final product of the project can be inspected. 4. Approved Change Requests Review - To verify that They were Implemented As Approved.
  29. 29. Control Quality: Outputs A Goal of the Control Quality Process is to Determine The Correctness of Deliverables. 1. Quality Control Measurements- The documented results of Control Quality Activities. 2. Validated Changes - Any Changed or Repaired Items are Inspected & will be either Accepted or Rejected before notification of the decision is provided. Rejected items may require rework. 3. Verified Deliverables - are the results of performing the Control Quality process. Verified Deliverables Are an Input To Validate Scope For Formalized Acceptance. 4. Work Performance Information - The performance data Collected from various controlling processes, Analyzed in context and integrated based on relationships across areas. 5. Change Requests - 6. Project Management Plan Updates - 7. Project Documents Updates - Ex. Quality standards, Agreements, Quality audit reports. 8. Organizational Process Assets Updates - Ex. Completed checklists & Lessons learned documentation.

×