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Adolescent & Young Adult
Scientific Working Group
(AYA SWG)
CFAR Annual Meeting
June 12, 2015
Objectives
• Review epidemiology of adolescent and young adult (AYA) HIV
• Introduce a working socio-ecologic conceptual f...
HIV Epidemiology among AYA: Global and U.S.
• Globally:
• 2.1 million adolescents 10-19 living with HIV
• 50% of PLHIV tho...
HIV Epidemiology among AYA: Baltimore
• 20% of newly infected individuals
between ages of 13-24
• Minority YMSM most heavi...
Working Ecologic Framework of AYA
Based on Brofenbrenner's Ecological Framework (Courtesy of Renata Arrington-Sanders)
Copyright © 2015 American Medical
Association. All rights reserved.
Wood S, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2015.
AYA SWG History
• January 2015 (interest solicited)
• February 2015 (first meeting)
• Monthly meetings
• Mission statement...
Jacky Jennings, PhD, MPH (SOM/SPH)
structural-level determinants and
interventions, STI and HIV transmission
dynamics, urb...
AYA SWG Mission Statement
The mission of the JHU CFAR’s Adolescent and Young Adult SWG is to promote
interdisciplinary res...
CFAR-Funded AYA-related Projects
Julie Denison* - ART adherence as HIV prevention among adolescents living with HIV in Ndo...
MHealth-Enhanced Economic Empowerment Initiatives for HIV
Prevention among Youth Living in Urban Slums in Kenya
Principal ...
“I met him on Jack’d” – Exploring Sex Partner Selection Patterns, HIV Risk
Behavior, & Risk Perceptions of YBMSM using Geo...
Reducing HIV Vulnerability among Adolescent and Adult
Transgender Women of Color: A community based assessment of
risks an...
Initiatives and Next steps
• Potential initiatives:
• Position paper on adolescents/young adults and HIV, identified gaps*...
THANK YOU!!!!
QUESTIONS? FEEDBACK?
COMMENTS?
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Adolescent and Young Adult Scientific Working Group

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Presentation from the 2015 CFAR Annual Meeting

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Adolescent and Young Adult Scientific Working Group

  1. 1. Adolescent & Young Adult Scientific Working Group (AYA SWG) CFAR Annual Meeting June 12, 2015
  2. 2. Objectives • Review epidemiology of adolescent and young adult (AYA) HIV • Introduce a working socio-ecologic conceptual framework of HIV infection in AYA • Present AYA SWG mission and potential initiatives and next steps to move mission forward • Highlight funded AYA focused CFAR projects
  3. 3. HIV Epidemiology among AYA: Global and U.S. • Globally: • 2.1 million adolescents 10-19 living with HIV • 50% of PLHIV thought to have contracted virus during adolescence • ≈ 700,000 youth 15-24 infected in 2013 alone, 250,000 (15-19) • Less likely to engage/retain in care and less adherent to cART • HIV-related mortality among adolescents ↑ 50% (2005-2013); ↓ 30% across other ages • United States: • 26% of new HIV-1 infections annually acquired among youth aged 13-24 years old • Number of total new HIV diagnoses ↓ by 4% (2000-2006);  by 21% among youth 13 – 24 year olds. • Young minority MSM most heavily affected • Only 1 in 4 infected youth aware of their status Source: CDC, UNAIDS, WHO
  4. 4. HIV Epidemiology among AYA: Baltimore • 20% of newly infected individuals between ages of 13-24 • Minority YMSM most heavily impacted • Rates increasing (1994-2011) in Baltimore, while decreasing in other major cities (San Francisco, Miami, L.A., NYC) • ≈60% unaware of their HIV status; Source: iDEA, Oster et al. AIDS Behav 2013
  5. 5. Working Ecologic Framework of AYA Based on Brofenbrenner's Ecological Framework (Courtesy of Renata Arrington-Sanders)
  6. 6. Copyright © 2015 American Medical Association. All rights reserved. Wood S, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2015.
  7. 7. AYA SWG History • January 2015 (interest solicited) • February 2015 (first meeting) • Monthly meetings • Mission statement • Brainstorming of mechanisms to achieve goals • Coming out party (today!)
  8. 8. Jacky Jennings, PhD, MPH (SOM/SPH) structural-level determinants and interventions, STI and HIV transmission dynamics, urban, disadvantaged youth​, Baltimore city Errol Fields, MD, PhD (SOM) Peds/Adolescent Medicine HIV, social networks and risk, venues, targeted HIV control strategies, Larissa Jennings, PhD MHS (SPH) International Health – Social and Behavioral Interventions Economic and structural approaches, HIV Prevention, Mixed Methods Kate Boehner CFAR Program Coordinator Cui Yang, PhD (SPH) Health, Behavior, and Society HIV & substance use risk reduction, social network analysis, mobile health, U.S./International Tonia Poteat, PhD, MPH, PA-C (SPH) Epidemiology – Center for Public Health and Human Rights, LGBT Health Disparities, HIV prevention and care, Mixed Methods Renata Arrington-Sanders, MD, MPH, ScM (SOM/SPH)* Adult/Peds/Adolescent medicine Qualitative, structural interventions, U.S.. Julie Denison, PhD, MHA (SPH)* Behavioral Scientist, HIV prevention and care, AYA living with HIV, sub-Saharan Africa, family-based interventions Lana Lee, MD (SOM) Adult/Peds Adolescent medicine, Quality improvement, Systems integration, Health outcomes, U.S./International Allison Agwu, MD, ScM (SOM)* Adult/Peds Infectious Disease HIV/AIDS AYA, health disparities & outcomes, clinical trials, HIV complications, U.S. *AYA SWG Co-chairs Current AYA SWG Members
  9. 9. AYA SWG Mission Statement The mission of the JHU CFAR’s Adolescent and Young Adult SWG is to promote interdisciplinary research collaborations across the intersecting domains of adolescent and young adult (AYA) health and HIV. Our goals are to: 1) Have broad impact in conceptualizing & developing innovative approaches to address critical scientific gaps for adolescent and young adults aged 13-25 years old who are living with, affected by, or at risk for HIV in domestic & international settings 2) Build interdisciplinary bridges across Johns Hopkins institutions to foster collaborative scholarship & mentorship to junior investigators at JHU 3) Promote translation of research-informed policies & practices impacting AYA populations by fostering partnerships with policy makers and practitioners
  10. 10. CFAR-Funded AYA-related Projects Julie Denison* - ART adherence as HIV prevention among adolescents living with HIV in Ndola, Zambia (2012) Larissa Jennings* - MHealth-Enhanced Economic Empowerment Initiatives for HIV Prevention among Youth Living in Urban Slums in Kenya (2012) Errol Fields* - I met him on Jack’D” – Exploring Sex Partner Selection Patterns, HIV Risk Behavior, and Risk Perceptions of YBMSM using GeoSocial Networking (GSN) Applications in Baltimore City (2014) Tonia Poteat* - Reducing HIV Vulnerability among Adolescent and Adult Transgender Women of Color: A community based assessment of risks and unmet needs (2014) Michelle Kaufman - Addressing Gender Issues, Violence and HIV on Ethiopian University Campuses: Elicitation Research and Intervention Development (2014) *AYA SWG Member
  11. 11. MHealth-Enhanced Economic Empowerment Initiatives for HIV Prevention among Youth Living in Urban Slums in Kenya Principal Investigator: Larissa Jennings, PhD • Collaborative Team: Muthoni Mathai, MBChB MMed PhD, Katherine Fritz, PhD MPH, John Ongech, MBChB, MMed Obs/Gyn, MPH; CFAR Mentor Deanna Kerrigan, PhD • Study Purpose: • This study uses mixed methods to characterize local and gendered representations of economic empowerment, its influence on HIV vulnerability, and the role of mobile technology among Kenyan youth living in two urban slums • Background: • Health-promoting economic empowerment initiatives are under-developed in the global response to HIV/AIDS. Youth living in impoverished urban settings are particularly vulnerable to HIV given high risk sexual behaviors, low education, poor access to health services, and reliance on illicit income generation. African youth have experienced rapid adoption of mobile phone technologies. • Approach: • Focus groups (n=20) : Findings will be used to develop an HIV economic empowerment scale • Quantitative data collection: to evaluate and test the HIV economic empowerment scale
  12. 12. “I met him on Jack’d” – Exploring Sex Partner Selection Patterns, HIV Risk Behavior, & Risk Perceptions of YBMSM using GeoSocial Networking (GSN) Applications in Baltimore City Principal Investigator: Errol L. Fields, MD PhD MPH • Collaborative Team: Jacky Jennings, PhD MPH, Renata Arrington-Sanders, MD MPH, ScM, Suzanne Grieb, PhD • Background • YBMSM (13-24) have had among highest HIV incidence in US and Baltimore • GSN apps Increasingly reported as sex partner meeting venues by newly diagnosed YBMSM in Baltimore • Study Aims 1. To explore utilization patterns of GSN apps for meeting sex partners, 2. To understand the sexual networks affiliated with GSN app venues by exploring individual and sexual dyad characteristics 3. To explore how participants use apps to assess and mitigate HIV/STI risk with partners met on GSN apps compared to non-GSN venues 4. To explore perspectives on acceptability and feasibility of using GSN apps to target YBMSM sex networks for prevention services • Approach • YBMSM (18-24) recruited on Jack’d in high viral load venues and areas • Semi-structured interviews (n=25); focus groups (n=5)
  13. 13. Reducing HIV Vulnerability among Adolescent and Adult Transgender Women of Color: A community based assessment of risks and unmet needs Principal Investigator: Tonia Poteat, PhD, PA-C, MPH • Collaborative Team: Renata Arrington-Sanders, MD, MPH, ScM & Andrea Wirtz, PhD, MHS • Study Aim: • To explore, quantify, and develop a response to the burden of HIV among adolescent and adult transgender women of color (TWOC) in Baltimore • Background: • TWOC have higher rates of HIV (rates of overall prevalence as high as 43% in Baltimore) & among young TWOC (ages 15-24 years) ranges from 19-22% • Approach: • Key informant interviews (n=10) • Focus groups (n=6) • Quantitative data collection (N=110)
  14. 14. Initiatives and Next steps • Potential initiatives: • Position paper on adolescents/young adults and HIV, identified gaps* • Panel discussion/seminar on youth (e.g., ethics, research challenges)* • Session at the CFAR Social and Behavioral Sciences Research Network Conference (October 2015)* • Integrate with other CFAR groups (JHU, other CFARs) • Capitalize on existing databases/networks to address adolescent questions (e.g., MACS, WIHS) • Increase awareness of adolescents and young adults in existing structures • Serve as a resource for investigators looking to include adolescents in their research • Expand (including but not limited to) • Behavioral economics, micro-financing • Cost-effectiveness • Mental health (involve clinical psychologists) • Health and human Rights • Ethics • Housing, correctional facilities, commercial sex work, schools, education, family • Implementation science *Initiatives in process
  15. 15. THANK YOU!!!! QUESTIONS? FEEDBACK? COMMENTS?

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