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Hope Crosson
Colorado State University
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section 1: The Matthews House
Section 2: Hope Crosson
Section 3: Papers
Section 4: Case Examples
Section...
Social Work Practice
Throughout this past semester, I feel as if my social work practice knowledge has
increased from 50% ...
Supervision Needs
Supervision was a process that I did not fully understand prior to entering my internship
this past seme...
time. The more efficiently that I can set apart my time in the week, the more I know I can get
done and the less stressed ...
Future Learning
As my future goes on in the world of social work, I am well aware that the learning does
not end when my f...
Boundary Setting
When working with youth there are many opportunities for boundaries to be crossed or at
the very least to...
Advocating for a Client: Case Example
In social work, we are aware that advocating is necessary, and can quickly build
rap...
Ethical Dilemma: Case Example
When I learned about what an ethical dilemma technically is a few years ago, it became
incre...
Reflection: Meetings
Throughout various types of meetings throughout the semesters there were times when I
could simply ob...
READINGS
Ending Poverty in our Communities-What communities can do right now to transform and thrive
in the new economy: S...
Newspaper Article - Vision for Redtail Ponds: Reflection
Homelessness, low socio-economic status, being on disability, all...
Assessment and Intervention Plan with Client JD
Engagement: This client was given to me approximately 1 month into my inte...
The Matthews House Project Planner
Program Title: Girl’s Group
Program Dates & Times: TBD
Project Manager: Katy Schmidt Le...
Project Description:
“If you want to be a leader, not a follower. If you want to be a friend
and sister who people can cou...
Internal Assets Opportunities:
Caring; Equality and social justice; Integrity; Honesty; Responsibility;
Restraint; Plannin...
Risk Management/Safety Plan: (Address any venue safety issues, providers of
transportation: copy of Driver’s License and p...
Program Goals & Objectives:
1. Youth will develop healthy interpersonal communication skills.
a. Each youth will have the ...
Marketing Plan:
Post on website calendar and facebook
Evaluation Tool(s):
Attachments:
Expenses and/or Donations: (Use lin...
Notes for future programming:
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  1. 1. ! Hope Crosson Colorado State University
  2. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS Section 1: The Matthews House Section 2: Hope Crosson Section 3: Papers Section 4: Case Examples Section 5: Assessments Section 6: Additional Material
  3. 3. Social Work Practice Throughout this past semester, I feel as if my social work practice knowledge has increased from 50% to 100% (exaggeration, of course). What I mean however is that what I have learned this past semester are things that I could never have been taught in a classroom, I needed to experience them head on to prepare me for my future as a social worker. Over the past semester I can specifically identify highs as well as lows that I have experienced during my internship at the Matthews House. As for the social work roles of advocate, broker, community chance agent, counselor, mediator, and researcher, I feel that I have touched on all of them throughout my internship. I have used them with clients to access resources in the community, connect them to needs, talk them through difficult situations, and son on. Social work as a whole requires all of these roles to be used throughout various time and places. During my internship I have learned that social work is a very tough field, and it is not always what you wish it could be. You cannot control what you clients do, you cannot even control what your co-workers choose to do. In social work I feel like you need to realize that people are people, and they will make their free will choices when you are working with them-regardless. After this past semester, I feel as if I am ready to now enter the social work field on my own, while seeking constant advice and counseling from peers. My internship has prepared my in ways that I could never have thought to be imaginable, and I am extremely grateful for that.
  4. 4. Supervision Needs Supervision was a process that I did not fully understand prior to entering my internship this past semester, however I now see the upmost importance of it as well. As I said previously, supervision was something that was a process for me as well a my supervisor because we needed to be on the same page, which we honestly were not for half of the semester. Supervision is a time to reflect, a time to process, which is of the upmost importance when you can be working on your own for five days in a row without consulting other individuals. After my experiences this semester I have found that my needs for supervision vary from week to week. I have found that the process that works the most efficiently for myself is debriefing the highs and the lows of what I have experienced with each individual client and then questions regarding tricky situations with them. I also love to have input on next steps with clients and have a different perspective on how to approach topics or issues that are being experienced with a specific client. Though at first I was not fond of supervision, I have now realized that there is a great importance to it, and I will request for it at every agency I work with in the future as well. Plan for Self Care Working with youth, and in social work in general, I know that attending to self-care is of the upmost importance to remain good in practice. For myself personally there are a few things that I know to do in order to maintain self-care. Things such as time management, boundary setting, and my faith are essential to me in self care. Time management is one of the crucial elements in managing my self-care. I am going to be doing this by seeking out what my week is going to look like at the beginning of every week so I can prioritize my time in ways where I am not overexerting myself or overcommitting my
  5. 5. time. The more efficiently that I can set apart my time in the week, the more I know I can get done and the less stressed I will become in the future since I know what the week holds. Boundaries to me are things such as saying “yes” and “no” to things. I plan on be contentious of what I am committing to when I say yes to things, and being aware if I can be fully there when I make commitments. In essence, saying no to things and being aware of my yes is one of my tactics in self-care. When it comes to self-care, the most important way I go about self-care is through my faith and faith community. Being apart of a faith community and having my faith in day to day life is what resets me every day when going into my internship and when leaving. For me, this is the most important and most effective part of my self-care process, and I would not be able to remain focused and centered in my internship without it. Self Assessment This past semester I feel like I have put my best foot forward in regards to SOWK 492. This class has proved to push me in areas of my social work knowledge that I believe I needed some final pushes in. Having the option to be able to talk with my classmates at least once a week about my internship and issues going on really assisted in helping me process what was going on. I believe that I came to class every week extremely prepared for what was meant to be turned in or discussed on that specific day. I was ready as well as excited to discuss with my group and hear about what they were experiencing in their other settings as well. Seminar, once again, has helped me take that next step into the real social work world and have varying perspectives on issues that are going on in my agency as well as others.
  6. 6. Future Learning As my future goes on in the world of social work, I am well aware that the learning does not end when my foot steps out of the classroom. Learning continues throughout every day, and every experience I have in and out of my roles a a social worker. I plan on learning through my practice as well as through my peers. I am also prepared to stay up to date on social work and psychology journals to stay knowledgable and relevant on current social work practices and findings of researchers. As for my own future and plans, I do intend on initially going straight into practice with my BSW, hopefully working within a few different agencies and demographics. After having initial hands on work, I do wish to go on and pursue my MSW at a university to further my social work knowledge as well as career.
  7. 7. Boundary Setting When working with youth there are many opportunities for boundaries to be crossed or at the very least to be challenged. Teenagers love to push the envelope and to push you to where you need to create boundaries. When interning at The Matthews House transportation of students is inevitable. Transportation is needed to get to the house, to get youth to events, and to get youth home after events are finished. Being in a car with a youth for any period of time can allow for really good conversations, as well as the youth trying to push you past your boundaries. In order to be in control of any given situation in an automobile, boundaries need to be set when the youth come and sit in the car. Case Example An example of experiences that I have had are when I have had to transport youth from any activity back to their home. When they enter the vehicle boundaries need to be set. Therefore when a youth came into the car I would tell them, “we can listen to any music, as long as it’s appropriate.” Another boundary that came up during activities and in the cars is when youth want to talk about inappropriate things (such as sex). This is not a boundary that I would set right away, but that I would correct when it came up in conversation. These are just a couple of examples of ways that I have had to set boundaries with youth during my internship at The Matthews House, all of which I have found to be very useful in the end.
  8. 8. Advocating for a Client: Case Example In social work, we are aware that advocating is necessary, and can quickly build rapport between you and the client. It shows that you are passionate about them, or the population that you are serving. While at The Matthew’s House I have found ways to advocate for the individual clients that I have worked with throughout the semester. I can think of one specific client where I felt the need to continuously advocate for him throughout his Senate Bill 94 process. Throughout the time of having him as a client I had to continuously check in with Senate Bill 94 workers and tell them how he was doing. Naturally, I would have reported differently if he was not doing well in his progress. However, I was in a position to be able to advocate for him every week when I sent weekly check ins to the Senate Bill worker. I advocated for this specific client by having good reports for him every week (which were accurate). When I was asked about my specific relationship with the client I always advocated for him to have his rights back because I saw him making strides towards earning those specific things back. Advocating for a client, or policy is a very empowering and important process where you are in a role to do so and have serious impact. I am very thankful that my word was very impactful throughout the process with this client, and I truly got to see think impact of advocacy.
  9. 9. Ethical Dilemma: Case Example When I learned about what an ethical dilemma technically is a few years ago, it became increasingly difficult to not be aware of them. Ethical dilemmas are everywhere you turn, they happen more frequently and effect you more, however, if you make a conscious choice to involve yourself in them. An ethical dilemma that I personally experienced over and over again had not to do with the specific clients at the Matthews House, but with the co-workers that I was given. Gossip is everywhere, and there is not an exception when it comes to a social work field placement. There were things being said about clients, about other workers, even about the woman who started the Matthews House. I have experienced both choices multiple times when it comes to ethical dilemma, to engage with the gossip or to turn away. At this point, I feel like I have learned what the best decision is. This ethical dilemma of gossip and choosing to not talk about others or to talk about others resolved in two separate ways. One way I chose to deal with it was to confront the issue head on, and I also chose to deal with it by ignoring it. Reflecting back I am glad that I have deal with this ethical dilemma in different ways, because I got to see how I felt with different solutions. Tolerating the situation became of the most importance, because in social work practice there is going to be conflict wherever you go. I have learned ways of coping and ways of not to cope through this ethical dilemma, and I am glad I have gotten to experience it.
  10. 10. Reflection: Meetings Throughout various types of meetings throughout the semesters there were times when I could simply observe, but others times in which it was essential for me to engage. I can think back and reflect on specific meetings regarding particular clients that the meetings were pertaining to. I had the opportunity to attend as well as engage in two Family Unity Meetings (FUMs) at DHS regarding the same family both times. In those meetings my focus was on the interactions that were occurring with individuals, family members to family members, professionals with professionals, and then professionals with family members (clients). These meetings were critical for this family because they decided treatment plans for the family for the next several weeks. I needed to be engaged in these meetings so I could put in my perspective of how the children acted and behaved around myself and others while at the Matthews House. This was a very empowering and nerve wracking experience overall.
  11. 11. READINGS Ending Poverty in our Communities-What communities can do right now to transform and thrive in the new economy: Scott C. Miller, CEO Move the Mountain Leadership Center Hard Differentiators: Bridges Community of Practice Model Nurturing Attachments: Deborah Gray, MSW, MPA. April 3, 2013 Using the Hidden Rules of Class to Create Sustainable Communities: Philip E. DeVol *See included handouts for more readings and trainings completed*
  12. 12. Newspaper Article - Vision for Redtail Ponds: Reflection Homelessness, low socio-economic status, being on disability, all are specific issues that are consistently ran across with clients involved with the Matthews House. Redtail Ponds has sprung up over years of preparation in order to try and help subside some of these issues. This article explains the process of what Redtail Ponds has gone through to get to its point of construction, and now excepting applicants. This housing development has been created to provide safe and affordable housing for homeless individuals, veterans, people on disability, and low-socio economic status (overall). The issue of homelessness has permeated Fort Collins for a very long time, and it is beautiful to see that something is finally being done towards helping this issue. The social justice issue of homelessness is close to my heart due to the fact that there are clients at the Matthews House that are homeless, or have been homeless in the past. Also, almost all of our cliental fall under applying for affordable housing as well. This article was exciting, and empowering to read. While I always wish that even more could be done to help the homeless and those that need affordable housing, I believe this is a gigantic step in the right direction, and I look forward to seeing some of our clients living there in the future!
  13. 13. Assessment and Intervention Plan with Client JD Engagement: This client was given to me approximately 1 month into my internship. He was referred to the Matthews House through the Senate Bill 94 system. JD has broken the law and recently been let out of Platte Juvenile Detention Center. I engaged with him first by setting up a time to meet with him prior to a court date that he had been given (for Senate Bill 94). I communicated with his mother and connected with her on a time that we could meet. We met before JD’s first court date. Assessment: When meeting with a client for the first time at the Matthews House we start by doing basic introductions, but there is also a basic intake packet that must be done within the first meeting. I completed the assessment/intake with JD during our first meeting time at the court house. Through the questions asked, I learn about the client’s likes and dislikes, family background, drug history, mental health history, and so on. From this intake I now have the ability to assess and intervene where the client is at. I assessed JD after this initial intake and what needs were present. JD’s needs after the assessment: finishing community service hours, getting grades back up, learning about how to get a pilot’s license, and graduating high school. From this point, I could make goals and plans for every time I was going to be meeting with JD from that point on. Intervention: After assessment, building an intervention was relatively easy with this client. JD identified to me that his most important goal was to finish his community service hours. We proceeded with this by meeting one to two times and week and primarily focused on completing his community service hours every time that we met. Intervention then morphed into continuing on working on his other goals whenever he identified them. Evaluation: I evaluated my time with this client by looking back and seeing the first goals that we identified during our first meeting together (as mentioned previously). Success can be determined by if these goals were accomplished or if any change with this client occurred, and time was met with them. I believe that my time spent with this client can be seen as successful. Together we accomplished most of his large goals that he wanted to complete, and still discussed the other goals on a weekly basis.
  14. 14. The Matthews House Project Planner Program Title: Girl’s Group Program Dates & Times: TBD Project Manager: Katy Schmidt Lead Time: TBD Team Members & Contact Info: Katy Schmidt; katy@thematthewshouse.org; (970) 286- 1445 Life Stage(s): check all that apply □ Early Childhood (ages 0-5) □ Children (Grades K-3) □ Middle Childhood (ages 8-11) X Adolescents (ages 12-18) □ Young Adults (19-24) □ Adults (25+) □ Seniors (55+) Program Format (i.e., self-improvement, competition, self-directed, etc.): Pro social, therapeutic, risk prevention, self-improvement
  15. 15. Project Description: “If you want to be a leader, not a follower. If you want to be a friend and sister who people can count on. If you want to dream bigger, be your best self and achieve your goals...then Girl’s Group is for you!” Under the facilitation of Katy Schmidt, Transition Facilitator, female participants will engage in topical conversations. Each meeting the topic will change and may be guided by the participants’ area of interest. Girl’s Group a unique leadership development program for girls ages 16-21. Our groups are girls-only gatherings where girls have an opportunity to talk, listen, dream, set goals and find the support they need to be anything they want to be. Girls in each group develop strong bonds with one another and the staff. They learn to identify topics important to them, speak honestly and from the heart, trust, and share.The group will focus on topics the clients choose but the goal of the group is to build female friendships while also discussing risk prevention topics in a safe environment. The group will also have a craft element- often youth are more willing to share if their hands are busy. This craft will build into the group topic. Crafts included in past groups- personal journals, creating your life story etc. Also, if other mentors in the group could teach practical skills such as sewing, knitting, crocheting if the youth are interested. In this group youth will increase their knowledge of risky behaviors and dangerous elements such as: drugs, the effects of drugs, while also dispelling some common myths. Youth will also increase their knowledge of facts about sex, sexual behaviors, and sexually transmitted diseases. Facilitator will include other community collaborators to help with presenting this information as well as other adult female mentors in these discussions. Event Schedule: Every other Wednesday @ YFC; 4:00-6:00 External Assets Met: Other adult relationships; Community values youth; Youth as resources; Safety; Adult role models; Positive peer influences; High expectations; Youth programs; Service to Others; Community cherishes and values young children
  16. 16. Internal Assets Opportunities: Caring; Equality and social justice; Integrity; Honesty; Responsibility; Restraint; Planning and decision making; Interpersonal competence; cultural competence; Resistance skills; Peaceful conflict resolution; Personal power; Self-esteem; Sense of purpose; Positive view of personal future, Healthy lifestyle Hard Skills Met: Inclusivity/Accessibility Plan: Plan of Action: Main Steps—Need to Know—Milestones 1. Katy will alert all Transition Facilitators on activities on Calendar 2. TFs will invite appropriate female participants to activity 3. Katy will follow up with Transition Facilitators on the participants they have chosen to determine if they are appropriate for the activity 4. Katy will sign up appropriate youth on Google Documents 5. Arrange transportation to and from activity 6. Coordinate with volunteers on times and expectation 7. Purchase snacks and materials for activity that week 8. Work with Katy Schmidt on any programming 9. Set-up the youth-lounge in comfortable setting for Girl’s Group
  17. 17. Risk Management/Safety Plan: (Address any venue safety issues, providers of transportation: copy of Driver’s License and proof of insurance, participant release forms completed, plans for contacting emergency contacts, availability to access emergency providers, travel plans: mode of transportation, route plan, time of departure and return, weather plans, etc.) Transportation: Transportation is available for clients of The Matthews House and/or community members that have completed The Matthews House Liability Release form. The Matthews House staff and/or approved volunteers will provide transportation using one of The Matthews House vans or other approved vehicle. Venue Safety Issues: Emergency Contact Planning: Katy Schmidt will handle all emergencies. For a life threatening emergency TMH staff/volunteer will dial 9-1-1 followed by a call to Jerri Howe, Executive Director at 970-420-9355 or Denise Suniga, Associate Director at 970-217-7273. Access to Emergency Providers: All staff at TMH are first aid/cpr certified. The nearest hospital is Poudre Valley Hospital, 1024 S. Lemay, Fort Collins, CO Off-site Travel Plans (mode of transportation, route plan, time of departure & return): N/A Inclement Weather Plan: N/A Other: Community Collaboration(s): Health Department/Planned Parenthood; Sexual Assault Victims Advocacy; Project Fort Collins; Women’s Resource Center; Junior League
  18. 18. Program Goals & Objectives: 1. Youth will develop healthy interpersonal communication skills. a. Each youth will have the opportunity, and be asked by the facilitator, to share their opinion, perspective, and thoughts pertaining to the topic. b. Youth will utilize a new communication skill each week that will be introduced by the Facilitator at the beginning of the meeting. Examples include: active listening, reflecting back, using "I" statements, etc. 2. Youth will build positive peer and adult relationships a. All youth will participate in an ice breaking and team building activity at the beginning of Girl’s Group to facilitate positive interactions and encourage relationship building. b. Youth will agree on the Ground Rules of Girl’s Group, which are set in place to help create an atmosphere of trust, respect and kindness. If changes are proposed to the Ground Rules the group, under the guidance of the facilitator, will work together to amend the rules. c. Youth will be matched with appropriate mentor if requested. 3. Youth will demonstrate leadership qualities. a. Youth will have the opportunity to plan the Girl’s Group program, develop topics and questions, and facilitate the meeting with assistance from Staff. b. Youth will take turns each week engaging with the volunteer and mentors in sharing their personal stories and providing support to one another. 4. Youth will also increase their knowledge of facts about sex, sexual behaviors, and sexually transmitted diseases through printed material provided by Project Life or outside community resources. Materials/Equipment Needed: Craft materials: journals, glue, magazines, poster boards, yarn, sewing materials, crocheting etc. Cookies or other snacks Printed materials
  19. 19. Marketing Plan: Post on website calendar and facebook Evaluation Tool(s): Attachments: Expenses and/or Donations: (Use line item budget for larger projects) Income or budget allotment: Estimated Expenses: Weekly ingredients $50.00 X 24 sessions/year = $1,200.00 Actual Expenses: TBD Net Cash or Deficit:
  20. 20. Notes for future programming:

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