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Home Office Digital user research, service design and agile

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How we're designing and building services at the Home Office with user research and agile. Includes tips on how to change the way an organisation works.

Published in: Government & Nonprofit
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Home Office Digital user research, service design and agile

  1. 1. Transforming the Home Office with user centred design and agile Head of User Research and Design – Katy Arnold, @katyarnie Head of Service Design – Kate Tarling, @kateldn
  2. 2. Revolution not evolution.
  3. 3. Think about the whole system Image from https://gds.blog.gov.uk/2015/08/18/ mapping-new-ideas-for-the-digital-justice-system-2/
  4. 4. Users include people who help deliver the service
  5. 5. Understand people’s lives first
  6. 6. Do contextual research
  7. 7. Find out what people are doing, what’s good, bad. Opportunities. Find out that checking passports can happen on a bus
  8. 8. How users think, feel, behave How we support How might we..?
  9. 9. What do actual user needs look like? As a user I need to get my passport so that I can prove my identity / travel > Send it by post when it’s ready?
  10. 10. What do actual user needs look like? I live in a big shared house and I’m worried about who has access to my mail. And I work so I might not be there anyway. And my flight is on Weds. > Delivery by post? > Secure collection points? > Same day service around work hours?
  11. 11. Thinking about only one part of a problem causes bigger problems.
  12. 12. Key life stages and major transitions Moving to the UK Getting a job or employing someone Moving home
  13. 13. Understanding what users need from government. Not just what a department needs from users.
  14. 14. Reframe the problem ● Who are the users? ● What are people actually trying to do? ● What outcomes do people want? ● What outcomes does government want? ● How will we know if it works? Key metrics?
  15. 15. Doing less but doing better things
  16. 16. A service ● Is a verb not a noun ● Has a beginning, middle and an end ● Not just the digital part ● Has a policy intent ● Is usable by anyone who needs it ● Can work across all channels
  17. 17. Common service patterns ● Getting permission to do something ● Checking entitlements ● Asserting my right to… ● Proving things about myself (identity, income) ● Meeting the rules ● Enforcing rules
  18. 18. Some ways in which services fail ● Manual processing ● Contact because things aren’t clear ● Contact to find out what’s happening ● Repetition ● Hours wasted of people’s time
  19. 19. Most of the time a better service is a more efficient service
  20. 20. Reducing this.
  21. 21. 1. Passport 2. Photo 3. Employers  le4er 4. Le4er  of  invita;on 5. Bank  deposit  cer;ficate 6. Bank  statement 7. Property  cer;ficate 8. Marriage  cer;ficate 9. Re;rement  cer;ficate 10. Family  book  (Hukou) 11. Business  registra;on  cer;ficate 12. Car  insurance 13. Cer;ficate  of  rela;onship  to  parents 14. U;li;es  bills,  P60  council  tax  bill
  22. 22. 1. Passport 2. Photo 3. Employers  le4er 4. Le4er  of  invita;on 5. Bank  deposit  cer;ficate 6. Bank  statement 7. Property  cer;ficate 8. Marriage  cer;ficate 9. Re;rement  cer;ficate 10. Family  book  (Hukou) 11. Business  registra;on  cer;ficate 12. Car  insurance 13. Cer;ficate  of  rela;onship  to  parents 14. U;li;es  bills,  P60  council  tax  bill
  23. 23. 25% Reduction in paper documents needed for a visa application
  24. 24. Ask for a small, specific thing
  25. 25. What user researchers and designers do in discovery, alpha, beta. By @leisa
  26. 26. Show rather than tell
  27. 27. Seeing the team building things and learning, every week
  28. 28. Rather than talk about opinions, see whether something is good or bad by doing it
  29. 29. What? No one knows what this means
  30. 30. What? No one knows what this means Oh, I need to pay in case I see a doctor
  31. 31. Seeing the team building things and learning, every week
  32. 32. Some ways to measure •  Cost per transaction •  Hours spent doing something •  Volume of transactions •  Able to complete first time •  Confidence in decision making •  Preference to use
  33. 33. Use design hypotheses and research to prove or disprove
  34. 34. There’s a government community making evidence-based design patterns https://designpatterns.hackpad.com
  35. 35. Changing the way people do things
  36. 36. Use numbers of things
  37. 37. 1 user researcher per agile team or user journey
  38. 38. User research from week 1
  39. 39. Exposure hours: 2 hours every 6 weeks
  40. 40. Do user research every sprint 5 people for interviews and/or usability testing
  41. 41. Focus on users. Not just on writing stories.
  42. 42. Changing how we speak and communicating more.
  43. 43. User experience is not one person’s job title. People who hold budgets, set deadlines, make policy can have more impact on experience than a designer - @leisa
  44. 44. Better not to do user research than research that has no impact. Don’t show that it’s optional, not that useful or that it can be ignored.
  45. 45. Summary •  Understand people’s lives first •  Do less but do it better •  Show rather than tell •  Change how people do things •  Change how we speak and communicate more
  46. 46. Thanks Head of User Research and Design – Katy Arnold, @katyarnie Head of Service Design – Kate Tarling, @kateldn And thanks to @leisa and @jwaterworth

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