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Design for Humanity, not humans

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Humanity is feeling the effects of huge changes due to design and technology but often is left out of the considerations when we create that world. What does it mean to design ethically, and how can we do it? Hollie will explore how and why we should switch from a focus on individuals to focus on humanity.

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Design for Humanity, not humans

  1. 1. Design for humanity not humans @hollielubbock Fjord November 2018
  2. 2. Hello, @hollielubbock
  3. 3. “Whoever controls the menu controls the choices.” Tristan Harris, Center for Humane Technology
  4. 4. The issue of
 Dark Patterns
  5. 5. Design = practical ethics
  6. 6. Why do we need ethical design more than ever?
  7. 7. “The pace of change has never been this fast, yet it will never be this slow again.” Justin Trudeau, Davos 2018
  8. 8. Lonelier, 
 Less satisfied, 
 Less productive
  9. 9. “We are morphing so fast that our ability to invent new things outpaces the rate we can civilise them.” Kevin Kelly, The Inevitable
  10. 10. So how do we design ethically?
  11. 11. 11 Human Centred Humanity centred
  12. 12. ‘Any team with performance targets will try to manoeuvre user behaviour to reach company goals. This means we can’t simply pledge to never practice persuasion, we’d have to quit design all together. Instead, we have to dive in with intent acknowledging our responsibilities and choosing how to address the ethical challenges’ 
 ― Cennydd Bowles, Future Ethics
  13. 13. 02 Design for transparency 03 Design 
 mindfully 01 Design for respect Humans & Humanity 
 3 key areas
  14. 14. Design for respect
  15. 15. Understand 
 your impact ind.ie
  16. 16. Toolkit Ethics for Designers Moral advocacy > Moral value map Moral value map SPECS Suggested Time 30 - 60 minutes Materials needed Overview universal human values, this template, post-its, pens Participants Design team, stakeholders Process phase Framing, validating for more tools check out: www.ethicsfordesigners.com PROCESS State your design. Ensure everyone agrees on what you are working on. Select the human values that are relevant to your design. Translate each value into a concern to describe how it is present in the context you are designing for. Write the concerns on post-its. Map the relations between the different concerns. Discuss any conflicts between stakeholders. Not all conflicts must be resolved, some tension could inspire the design. But it should be clear which values you agree to prioritise. Write down the design’s effect on each concern. Choose from: The design inhibits/supports/limits/enhances/ prevents/enables/reinforces/undermines/ challenges this concern. Discuss the effect of the design on the different concerns. Also discuss any changes that should be made to the design. 1 2 3 4 5 6 Values are an important concept in ethics. With this tool you will look at which values are relevant to your design and how your design affects them. Doing this exercise with different stakeholders helps to understand everyone’s value priorities. 1. OUR DESIGN IS... 4. MAP THE CONCERNS: 5. DESCRIBE THE DESIGN’S EFFECT ON EACH CONCERN 2. SELECT VALUES RELEVANT TO YOUR DESIGN: 6. DISCUSS THE EFFECT OF YOUR DESIGN: 3. TRANSLATE VALUES TO CONCERNS: e.g. AUTONOMY X virtual reality gaming = “I want to be in control of my own actions in the game” Which concerns does each stakeholder prioritise? Which concerns conflict? The design inhibits/supports/limits/enhances/prevents/enables/reinforces/undermines/challenges this concern. Does everyone agree this fits your design intentions? Is the design morally right? Entertainment: Experiencing excitement or heightened arousal Physical well being: Feeling healthy, energetic or physically robust Receiving: Obtaining approval, support or validation from others Bodily sensations: Experiencing pleasure associated with the senses, physical movement or bodily contact Exploration: Satisfying one’s curiosity about personally meaningful events Understanding: Gaining knowledge or making sense out of something Positive self: Maintaining a sense of self-confidence, pride or self-worth Transcendence: Experiencing optimal or extraordinary states of functioning Harmony: Experiencing a profound sense of connectedness, harmony or oneness with people, nature or a greater power Tranquility: Feeling relaxed and at ease Belonging: Building or maintaining attachments, friendships, intimacy or a sense of community Equity: Promoting fairness, justice, reciprocity or equality Giving: Giving approval, support, assistance, advice or validation to others Responsibility: Keeping interpersonal commitments, meeting social role obligations and conforming to social rules Management: Maintaining order, organisation or productivity in daily life tasks Creativity: Engaging in activities involving artistic expression or novel though Safety: Being unharmed, physically secure and free from risk Mastery: Meeting a challenging standard of achievement or improvement Uniqueness: Feeling unique, special or different. Autonomy: Experiencing a sense of freedom to act or make choices. Superiority: Comparing favorably to others in terms of winning, status or success. Intellectual stimulation: Engaging in activities involving original thinking or novel or interesting ideas Moral value map https://www.ethicsfordesigners.com Moral advocacy > Moral value map 5. DESCRIBE THE DESIGN’S EFFECT ON EACH CONCERN 2. SELECT VALUES RELEVANT TO YOUR DESIGN: Entertainment: Experiencing excitement or heightened arousal Physical well being: Feeling healthy, energetic or physically robust Receiving: Obtaining approval, support or validation from others Bodily sensations: Experiencing pleasure associated with the senses, physical movement or bodily contact Exploration: Satisfying one’s curiosity about personally meaningful events Understanding: Gaining knowledge or making sense out of something Positive self: Maintaining a sense of self-confidence, pride or self-worth Transcendence: Experiencing optimal or extraordinary states of functioning Harmony: Experiencing a profound sense of connectedness, harmony or oneness with people, nature or a greater power Tranquility: Feeling relaxed and at ease Belonging: Building or maintaining attachments, friendships, intimacy or a sense of community Equity: Promoting fairness, justice, reciprocity or equality Giving: Giving approval, support, assistance, advice or validation to others Responsibility: Keeping interpersonal commitments, meeting social role obligations and conforming to social rules Management: Maintaining order, organisation or productivity in daily life tasks Creativity: Engaging in activities involving artistic expression or novel though Safety: Being unharmed, physically secure and free from risk Mastery: Meeting a challenging standard of achievement or improvement Uniqueness: Feeling unique, special or different. Autonomy: Experiencing a sense of freedom to act or make choices. Superiority: Comparing favorably to others in terms of winning, status or success. Intellectual stimulation: Engaging in activities involving original thinking or novel or interesting ideas
  17. 17. Enhancing human potential
  18. 18. Better as a team http://humanrobotinteraction.org/journal/ index.php/HRI/article/view/173
  19. 19. Transparency
  20. 20. Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic ― Arthur C. Clarke
  21. 21. Who is doing it well? Everlane
  22. 22. 23 Netflix, Fit, Headspace, Amazon, Google maps Who is doing it well?
  23. 23. “Transparency does not happen on its own: it has to be consciously audited, understood, designed and implemented to take root” ― Andy Polaine
  24. 24. Design Mindfully
  25. 25. Frictionless = choice-less?
  26. 26. Consideration levels 1. Who is the project for? 2.What is the project? 3.Can you create positive impact? 4.How do you feel?
  27. 27. ‘Ethics must become a custom, a way of thinking, a set of values held by all in the industry’…’ethics as ethos’ 
 ― Cennydd Bowles, Cameron Tomkinson
  28. 28. Stop. Think. Consider. Design
  29. 29. 02 Design for transparency —
 Be clear about what it is and how it works 03 Design 
 mindfully —
 Stop. Think. Consider. Design 01 Design for respect —
 Enhance humans & respect human values Humans & Humanity 
 3 key areas
  30. 30. Thank you! Any Questions? @hollielubbock

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