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Ionic and Binary Molecular Compounds<br />
Compounds<br />2 broad categories:<br />Ionic compounds<br />Binary molecular compounds<br />Both types of compounds:<br /...
Bonds<br />Bonds:<br />Electrostatic attraction<br />Holds atoms together<br />2 types:<br />Ionic bond<br />Occurs in ion...
Application of Octet Rule<br />Atoms with only 1, 2, or 3 valence electrons:<br />Which groups?<br />Tend to lose electron...
Examples of Ionic Compounds<br />Atom from Group 1 with an atom from Group 7<br />Li combining with F<br />Li loses 1 elec...
Example of an ionic compound: Li combining with F<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Ionic_bonding.png)<br />
Binary Molecular Compound<br />Formed when 2 non-metals come together<br />Formed via covalent bond<br />Examples:<br />CH...
Example of a Binary Molecular Compound: Covalent Bond<br />({{Information |Description=Covalently bonded hydrogen and carb...
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Idol Proj Unit531610

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Idol Proj Unit531610

  1. 1. Ionic and Binary Molecular Compounds<br />
  2. 2. Compounds<br />2 broad categories:<br />Ionic compounds<br />Binary molecular compounds<br />Both types of compounds:<br />Composed of atoms in fixed ratios <br />Atoms connected by chemical bonds<br />
  3. 3. Bonds<br />Bonds:<br />Electrostatic attraction<br />Holds atoms together<br />2 types:<br />Ionic bond<br />Occurs in ionic compounds<br />Complete transfer of electron(s) from metal to non-metal<br />Covalent bond<br />Occurs in binary molecular compounds<br />Sharing of electrons between two non-metals<br />Formed in such a way that the octet rule for all atoms is satisfied<br />Octet rule states that all atoms will have 0 or 8 electrons in their valence(outer) shell after a bond is formed<br />
  4. 4. Application of Octet Rule<br />Atoms with only 1, 2, or 3 valence electrons:<br />Which groups?<br />Tend to lose electrons<br />Why?<br />Examples(Grp. 1: Li, K, Na and Grp. 2: Be, Mg, Ca)<br />Atoms with close to 8 electrons:<br />Groups 6, and 7<br />Tend to gain electrons(why?)<br />Examples(Grp. 6: O, S, Se and Grp. 7: F, Cl, Br, I)<br />
  5. 5. Examples of Ionic Compounds<br />Atom from Group 1 with an atom from Group 7<br />Li combining with F<br />Li loses 1 electron<br />Why?<br />F gains 1 electron<br />Why?<br />Atom from Group 2 with an atom from Group 6<br />Mg combining with O <br />Mg loses 2 electrons<br />Why?<br />O gains 2 electrons<br />Why?<br />
  6. 6. Example of an ionic compound: Li combining with F<br />http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Ionic_bonding.png)<br />
  7. 7. Binary Molecular Compound<br />Formed when 2 non-metals come together<br />Formed via covalent bond<br />Examples:<br />CH4<br />CO2<br />SO3<br />N2O4<br />
  8. 8. Example of a Binary Molecular Compound: Covalent Bond<br />({{Information |Description=Covalently bonded hydrogen and carbon in a molecule of methane. |Source=Created with Inkscape |Date=28 January 2006 |Author=DynaBlast |Permission=Creative Commons Attributio)<br />

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